Bottleing any good tips!!

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
I wanted to post and ask if anyone has any tips on bottling since I'm bottling for my second time. I only have a one gallon carboy of White House Honey Ale. I use GOLSH BOTTLES since If seemed the better option for me and we like to pilsners. Lol I had a micro brewer tell me to put my carboy in freezer 2 hrs ahead of time if there is a large yeast head. It's supposed to make it turn into a yeast cake so to speak that falls to the bottom and sticks together so the sediments don't end up making the beer cloudy in the bottles (HAS ANYONE TRIED THUS BEFORE). THANKS FOR ALL YOUR HELP!
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
Do I understand correctly, you have a batch of Honey Ale in a 1 gallon carboy/jug right now?

When did you brew it?
Is your beer done fermenting?

If it's done fermenting, there won't be any "yeast head," the yeast will have sunk to the bottom already. There may be a few small "yeast rafts" left, floating on top, but most yeast should have precipitated.
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
Do I understand correctly, you have a batch of Honey Ale in a 1 gallon carboy/jug right now?

When did you brew it?
Is your beer done fermenting?

If it's done fermenting, there won't be any "yeast head," the yeast will have sunk to the bottom already. There may be a few small "yeast rafts" left, floating on top, but most yeast should have precipitated.
Ok thanks yes it will be 2 weeks come Monday and I'll bottle and leave it in fridge for 2 more weeks. It's a kit. I made a heffenwizen a few months back it had a large amount of yeast still on top when I went to bottle it. Was it not done fermenting? It was a really good beer. Just so cloudy. I just wanted to make sure to avoid that this time.
 

DBhomebrew

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2020
Messages
2,428
Reaction score
4,670
Location
St Louis, MO
Ok thanks yes it will be 2 weeks come Monday and I'll bottle and leave it in fridge for 2 more weeks.

With a few weeks in between the two? You need it at room temperature for the yeast to do their carbonation thing.

The cold temps before bottling would be 'cold crashing'. Easily replaced with an extra week or two in the fermenter. Some would argue time is a beer's best friend.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
I made a heffenwizen a few months back it had a large amount of yeast still on top when I went to bottle it.
What do you mean with "yeast on top."^
On top of what?

I made a heffenwizen a few months back [...] It was a really good beer. Just so cloudy.
Hefeweizen are supposed to be cloudy. The name Hefeweizen literally means yeasty wheat beer.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
I had a micro brewer tell me to put my carboy in freezer 2 hrs ahead of time if there is a large yeast head. It's supposed to make it turn into a yeast cake so to speak that falls to the bottom and sticks together
That's called cold crashing.
But it needs way longer than 2 hours to precipitate, depending on the yeast and the height of the fermenting vessel. 2-5 days is common.

If you use a (small) 1 gallon carboy, cold crashing could be done in a day, as the distance for the yeast to travel is relatively short. If it is not clear yet, leave it longer. There will be a substantial yeast cake settled on the bottom.*

Once the beer is clear you siphon from the top, starting about halfway between the top surface and the yeast cake on the bottom, lowering the siphon as the beer level drops. Toward the end of the transfer, you can tilt the fermenter, by sticking a rolled up towel under one side, in order to keep the well you're siphoning from as deep as possible. Once you start sucking up yeast, stop the siphon.

Many siphons or racking canes can be outfitted with an inverter tippy that attaches to the bottom of the cane/siphon. It redirects the suction, coming now from the top, instead of the bottom, so you you're less likely to suck up yeast and trub.

* That yeast cake can be reused in subsequent batches, use about 1/5-1/4 of it in a beer of the same volume and gravity.
The yeast can be stored in the fridge for a few weeks to 3 months, even longer. Just keep your sanitation in check. Most of us will fill one or more small mason (jelly) jars with the yeast slurry, then pitch one or part of one into the next batch. Yeast gives on giving.
Read up about yeast harvesting.
 

hotbeer

Opinionated Newb
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2021
Messages
1,658
Reaction score
1,205
Grolsch bottles? I don't care for flip tops but if you like them go ahead.
My concern is just that the seals need replacing and one never really knows if the bails or whatever you call the fastening is in good shape to hold the stopper properly. So I'll stick with a normal bottle, new cap and bench capper every time.

To me, most everything people claim to get from cold crashing is done by just waiting till the yeast fall out of suspension at normal fermentation temps. Some say you need 3 or more days of cold crashing and sometimes I've had beer clean up in the same 3 days that others might be cold crashing. So sure, if it works well for you and you like to do that, then go ahead. For me it's just added complication. And fridge space I don't have.

I've waited as long as six weeks with beer in the primary FV for it to clean up. And every beer that has taken a long time has been a good to great beer. The beer I cold crashed was my most disappointing. But admittedly there were other factors involved in that too. But I did decide that I didn't want the extra fuss.

Sometimes you do wind up with a lot of stuff floating on top the beer in the FV. Not a big deal. It's only the clean beer in between the top and bottom that you want. No need to include any crud on top or bottom in your beer you bottle or keg.
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
What do you mean with "yeast on top."^
On top of what?


Hefeweizen are supposed to be cloudy. The name Hefeweizen literally means yeasty wheat beer.
After the information I've gathered here I think the heffenwizen I made still needed to ferment a bit longer in the carboy before I bottled it. It still had a lot of yeast on top of the beer. I was following the directions I received in the kit. I did however leave it in fridge for 3 weeks instead of 2. The beer was really good!
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
At what temperatures are you fermenting your beers, such as the Hefeweizen?
They're not in the fridge while fermenting, are they?


At what point did you put them in the fridge?
No they are not they fermenting in carboy for 2 weeks then a little sugar water mix is added to the wart. I think that the right word. Then I bottle it and leave it at room temperature for another 2 weeks. After a month has passed by I will then put it in the fridge and leave it for a week or 2. They heff was just a little off putting because of the mess in the bottle. It was my first time so I got A LOT of the sediments from the bottom of the carboy in the beer.


I just bottle the White House Honey Ale here are a few pictures of it. I just finished 30 minutes ago. I also tasted it to make sure it didn't taste sour or funny. It tasted ok. So I guess I'm on my way to a drinkable beer if I can wait. Lol
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20221004_130407.jpg
    IMG_20221004_130407.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 0
  • IMG_20221004_141522.jpg
    IMG_20221004_141522.jpg
    2.1 MB · Views: 0

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
OK, thanks for the extra information and the pictures, it helps seeing where problems lie.

You're doing (almost) everything right, the only thing that's causing the murky beer in the bottles is bottling straight from your fermenter, which contains your beer but also all the yeast.

Best/easiest solution most of us do, is gently transferring the clear beer on top of the yeast cake from the fermenter to another vessel, for the purpose of bottling (e.g., a bucket or another carboy), leaving all the settled out yeast ("cake") behind in the fermenter.* Then gently stir your sugar (priming) solution into the clear beer in the bottling vessel, and fill your bottles from there.

* When transferring your clear beer to a bottling vessel, use a racking cane or auto siphon, as I described in post #6:
Once the beer is clear you siphon from the top, starting about halfway between the top surface and the yeast cake on the bottom, lowering the siphon as the beer level drops. Toward the end of the transfer, you can tilt the fermenter, by sticking a rolled up towel under one side, in order to keep the well you're siphoning from as deep as possible. Once you start sucking up yeast, stop the siphon.

Many siphons or racking canes can be outfitted with an inverter tippy that attaches to the bottom of the cane/siphon. It redirects the suction, coming now from the top, instead of the bottom, so you you're less likely to suck up yeast and trub.
That way all the yeast stays behind. You can save that yeast out and reuse in another batch, as I also outlined in post #6.

You could bottle directly from your fermenter (carboy) by following a similar procedure in post #6, most essential being not to stick the racking cane or siphon in the yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter. You want it suspended well above the yeast cake, and slowly lower as the beer level recedes during the transfer. Best to have another set of hands available...

You can practice that transfer, or direct bottling from your fermenter, using water, and some sand (mimicking "heavy" yeast). Now yeast is way fluffier than sand, but you'll get the idea.
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
Im hoping this time I did a way better job at transferring the beer for further fermenting while it's in the bottles. I put it in the pot b4 I transferred it and made sure not to disturb the yeast in bottom of the carboy. Thank you so much for uour help. You have been amazing.
OK, thanks for the extra information and the pictures, it helps seeing where problems lie.

You're doing (almost) everything right, the only thing that's causing the murky beer in the bottles is bottling straight from your fermenter, which contains your beer but also all the yeast.

Best/easiest solution most of us do, is gently transferring the clear beer on top of the yeast cake from the fermenter to another vessel, for the purpose of bottling (e.g., a bucket or another carboy), leaving all the settled out yeast ("cake") behind in the fermenter.* Then gently stir your sugar (priming) solution into the clear beer in the bottling vessel, and fill your bottles from there.

* When transferring your clear beer to a bottling vessel, use a racking cane or auto siphon, as I described in post #6:

That way all the yeast stays behind. You can save that yeast out and reuse in another batch, as I also outlined in post #6.

You could bottle directly from your fermenter (carboy) by following a similar procedure in post #6, most essential being not to stick the racking cane or siphon in the yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter. You want it suspended well above the yeast cake, and slowly lower as the beer level recedes during the transfer. Best to have another set of hands available...

You can practice that transfer, or direct bottling from your fermenter, using water, and some sand (mimicking "heavy" yeast). Now yeast is way fluffier than sand, but you'll get the idea.
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
When
OK, thanks for the extra information and the pictures, it helps seeing where problems lie.

You're doing (almost) everything right, the only thing that's causing the murky beer in the bottles is bottling straight from your fermenter, which contains your beer but also all the yeast.

Best/easiest solution most of us do, is gently transferring the clear beer on top of the yeast cake from the fermenter to another vessel, for the purpose of bottling (e.g., a bucket or another carboy), leaving all the settled out yeast ("cake") behind in the fermenter.* Then gently stir your sugar (priming) solution into the clear beer in the bottling vessel, and fill your bottles from there.

* When transferring your clear beer to a bottling vessel, use a racking cane or auto siphon, as I described in post #6:

That way all the yeast stays behind. You can save that yeast out and reuse in another batch, as I also outlined in post #6.

You could bottle directly from your fermenter (carboy) by following a similar procedure in post #6, most essential being not to stick the racking cane or siphon in the yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter. You want it suspended well above the yeast cake, and slowly lower as the beer level recedes during the transfer. Best to have another set of hands available...

You can practice that transfer, or direct bottling from your fermenter, using water, and some sand (mimicking "heavy" yeast). Now yeast is way fluffier than sand, but you'll get the idea.
Hen it's done I'll put it in a glass so you can see the end result.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
transferring the beer for further fermenting while it's in the bottles.
When you say "further fermentation," (above^) are you referring to the (small) 2nd fermentation taking place after you add the (priming) sugar, which will carbonate your beer in the bottles?

Just to make sure we're on the same page, beer should be completely fermented out before you bottle it. If it's not completely done fermenting yet, it may produce bottle bombs, due to continued or resumed fermentation.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,957
Reaction score
10,223
Location
Pasadena, MD
Search revvy bottling tips. On my phone, I’ll useless sorry.
Thanks, I forgot about our wonderful @Revvy's informative thread. Here it is:
 

jtc617

Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
2
Location
Boston
OK, thanks for the extra information and the pictures, it helps seeing where problems lie.

You're doing (almost) everything right, the only thing that's causing the murky beer in the bottles is bottling straight from your fermenter, which contains your beer but also all the yeast.

Best/easiest solution most of us do, is gently transferring the clear beer on top of the yeast cake from the fermenter to another vessel, for the purpose of bottling (e.g., a bucket or another carboy), leaving all the settled out yeast ("cake") behind in the fermenter.* Then gently stir your sugar (priming) solution into the clear beer in the bottling vessel, and fill your bottles from there.

* When transferring your clear beer to a bottling vessel, use a racking cane or auto siphon, as I described in post #6:

That way all the yeast stays behind. You can save that yeast out and reuse in another batch, as I also outlined in post #6.

You could bottle directly from your fermenter (carboy) by following a similar procedure in post #6, most essential being not to stick the racking cane or siphon in the yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter. You want it suspended well above the yeast cake, and slowly lower as the beer level recedes during the transfer. Best to have another set of hands available...

You can practice that transfer, or direct bottling from your fermenter, using water, and some sand (mimicking "heavy" yeast). Now yeast is way fluffier than sand, but you'll get the idea.
Great Advice! I think when he stirred the priming sugar to bottle, he disturbed the yeast cake at the bottom and that produced a cloudy beer. I always use a bottling bucket and use the filling tube and fill from the bottom up. I save some of the yeast cake in a beer bottle capped 'and in the fridge for my next batch.
 

hotbeer

Opinionated Newb
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2021
Messages
1,658
Reaction score
1,205
Looking at the picture of your beer in the jug/carboy, I'd have waited to rack it off for bottling. Might take anywhere from a day to 5 or more weeks for it to clear up, but it solves the murky beer issue and there'll be less sediment in the bottles.

Some claim it's visual, but murky beer tastes crappy to me. Hop haze is nothing the same as murky.

Left long enough in the bottles, it'll all go to the bottom and you'll have clean and clear beer that you can just pour very carefully in to a glass with out disturbing the trub and yeast on the bottom.

But for a 1 gallon batch (3.8 litre), that's hard to make last that long.
 

TwistedGray

El Jefe Brewing Company
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
8,665
Reaction score
18,522
Location
Monterey Bay, California
Actually, to add one point of clarification to your process.

Based on how you've explained your progress, you only use time as your method of determining that the beer has fermented, 100%. I mean, if you give it more than enough time to ferment out, there's nothing wrong with that. However, if your only means of measuring that your beer is ready to be bottled is by time, you are missing a key component of your beer (alcohol percentage).

Using a hydrometer to take a gravity reading before you pitch yeast establishes a baseline, and taking a reading at the end of fermentation allows you to calculate the alcohol by volume in your beer. There are a handful of online calculators that can do this for you. For reference, you usually take one reading and wait two to three days to take a second reading, and if they match, fermentation is complete.

Perhaps you're already doing this? If not, you should do this ;)
 

aceluby

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
May 24, 2022
Messages
169
Reaction score
252
I do A LOT of single gallon brews. 2 weeks in the fermenter, sanitize each bottle, add 1/2 tsp of sugar per 12 oz into each bottle, fill from the primary to the bottle, cap, let it carb up for 2 weeks, fridge the night before you want to drink it. Those fermenters get me 8-10 beers depending on how much I dry hop and how much blow off happens.
 
OP
OP
T

Texasbunnie24

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
11
Reaction score
19
Location
Texas
This was the end result. And I was very very pleased. There is just one beer left I've been saving it.
 

Attachments

  • Resized_20221023_033223.jpeg
    Resized_20221023_033223.jpeg
    336.2 KB · Views: 0
Top