Bottled Sediment

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rjsilvers

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Complete newbie here, so be gentle...

Some microbrews I've tried have a lot of spent yeast on the bottom and others have little or none.

I've read (on this forum) that filtering out the yeast will not metabolize the sugar after bottling and produce the CO2 necessary for carbonation. That makes sense.

Is yeast the only way to carbonate or is just the cheapest? Are there any other ways to filter the beer so there's no sediment and yet still have adequate carbonation?

Thanks.
 

c.n.budz

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If you don't use the yeast to carbonate you have to use co2 to force carb. You have to keg the beer to force carb. You can get filtration systems from a lot of online retailers
 

cubbies

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Beers with yeast on the bottom have been "naturally carbonated". Yeast is still in the beer and it is used to eat some sugar (priming sugar) to create the carbonation necessary. Otherwise a beer will have to be "force carbonated" with CO2. It is not necessary to filter if you force carb.
 
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rjsilvers

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So if I'm understanding you guys right....

I simply keg the beer, force carbonate it, and bottle from the keg?
 

malkore

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yep, you'd need a 'beer gun' or some kind of counter-pressure filler, or you'll lose the carbonation trying to dispense into bottles.

Please keep in mind that drinking homebrew from the bottle is not proper. Why? because you miss the bouquet of the hops and malt, which is a significant aspect of the flavor/taste sensation. Even if you filter, force carb, and fill with an expensive beer gun, you'll still be missing half the flavor of the beer if you don't serve it in a glass.
 

BrianP

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There's nothing wrong with naturally carbonated (also known as bottle conditioned) beer. If you learn how to pour it correctly, you can leave the yeast behind.
 

TheH2

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Bottle conditioned beer is the best..... If you are giving beer away just let them know they need to pour into a glass and leave a little beer behind. I of course do that then go back and drink the leftovers.

I now try and find bottle conditioned beer.
 

scottfro

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BrianP said:
There's nothing wrong with naturally carbonated (also known as bottle conditioned) beer. If you learn how to pour it correctly, you can leave the yeast behind.

i've given up on even leaving any yeast behind. look at it as taking your vitamins :) (vitamin b to be exact which you loose when you have to take a leak alot when drinking)

i measured, and after i left the yeast behind from about 24 beers i had wasted an entire bottle of beer!
 
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rjsilvers

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Thanks for all the good responses.

The yeast doesn't actually bother me really, but SWSBO thinks its disgusting and said they must be brewing it wrong because "no other beers have that stuff in the bottom". I think she's just too used to drinking Corona.
 

SteveM

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rjsilvers said:
Thanks for all the good responses.

The yeast doesn't actually bother me really, but SWSBO thinks its disgusting and said they must be brewing it wrong because "no other beers have that stuff in the bottom". I think she's just too used to drinking Corona.
Actually, if you buy Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and look carefully, you will see that it has a sediment on the bottom, as do any number of high end commercial beers that are bottle conditioned. Usually they cost more than other beers.
 
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