Bottle priming and backsweetening

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

davidh224

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2022
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
I will preface this post by saying I am a relative newcomer to homebrewing beer.

I plan to brew a sour beer using lactobacillus. I would like to bottle prime AND backsweeten this beer.

The only feasible way of doing this I can think of is to bottle pasteurise to end the priming process; I can't use lactose, and I refuse to use sweetener. My plan would be as follows:

1. Brew beer in the normal way (but sour).
2. Backsweeten and immediately cold crash to pause fermentation and remove most of the yeast.
3. Bottle, without any extra sugar.
4. After some period of time (potentially evaluating carbonation by opening some bottles early), pasteurise the bottles to kill all remaining yeast / bacteria.
5. Age at room temperature for a couple weeks, before refrigerating to enjoy.

Has anyone done anything like this before? Does anyone have any better ideas? How long should I wait between pasteurising and bottling? Is this too risky???

Thanks in advance
 

Jag75

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
7,114
Reaction score
3,142
Location
Taft
Not sure how much or even if it will carb up without adding priming sugar. As for pasturizing ( I've never attempted) bottles , does the caps have to be off ? Also I thought the process would be to pasteurize first , then backsweeten.

What are you planning to use to backsweeten ?
What kind os sour ? Kettle or Co pitch
 
OP
OP
D

davidh224

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2022
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
In place of priming sugar, the backsweetener will be some kind of fermentable sugar. Co-pitched bacteria.

The plan is to leave the bottles capped once primed during pasteurisation. If I pasteurise first then backsweeten, I won't be able to prime because the yeast will all be dead :(
 

marc1

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 19, 2010
Messages
1,664
Reaction score
1,259
Location
OH
In place of priming sugar, the backsweetener will be some kind of fermentable sugar. Co-pitched bacteria.

The plan is to leave the bottles capped once primed during pasteurisation. If I pasteurise first then backsweeten, I won't be able to prime because the yeast will all be dead :(

PI've heard of people doing something similar for cider. I wouldn't want to risk the bottle bombs. I think a safer way to do it would be with kegging, but that's a lot of equipment.

If I was to do something like this, I would cold crash first, then backsweeten.
 
Top