Bottle conditioning my second batch, I have a question about bottle bombs

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italianorose

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I have a wild batch that had a consistent FG of 1.020. I took this measurement a week apart and they were the same FG. This batch was wild, and blew the blow off tube two times, until it settled down for the last week of fermenting.

This batch scarred me lol I’m scared of bottle bombs after the priming sugar. I have my bottles sitting between 69-71 degrees in a bucket. If I wrap a comforter over it to absorb the potential bottle bombs, will the insulation of the blanket induce bottle bombs itself?

Sorry Im a noob lol thank you
 

RM-MN

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Bottle bombs happen for about 3 reasons.
1. Bottling before the fermentation is over. Use your hydrometer to see that you have reached near the expected FG and use 2 or more readings to verify that it has completed.
2. Infection. If your beer becomes infected with wild yeast or bacteria that can eat the sugars your yeast could not they can raise the amount of CO2 to cause gushers or bottle bombs.
3. Using too much priming sugar or using the correct amount but do a poor job of mixing it so that part of the beer is low on carbonation and part is way too high.

Insulation may make the end result happen faster but will not affect the outcome. If you used the right amount of priming sugar, mixed it in well, and had good cleanliness to avoid infections you should have no worries.
 

NTBeer

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Insulation conserves heat, it doesn't generate it. You feel warmer under a blanket because your body generates heat and the blanket traps it better than your clothing. Fermentation is exothermic, but in a finished beer the minimal fermentation used to carbonate should not generate enough heat to be a worry.
 

bobeer

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I'd have to agree with RM-MN... if fermentation was complete and you're using good sanitizing practices you should be good. Maybe use a priming calculator to make sure you have the right amount of priming sugar. If you're not sure how much to use then you can look up the c02 per 12oz per the style of beer and get it in the wheelhouse. Good luck!
 

marc1

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I have a wild batch that had a consistent FG of 1.020. I took this measurement a week apart and they were the same FG. This batch was wild, and blew the blow off tube two times, until it settled down for the last week of fermenting.

This batch scarred me lol I’m scared of bottle bombs after the priming sugar. I have my bottles sitting between 69-71 degrees in a bucket. If I wrap a comforter over it to absorb the potential bottle bombs, will the insulation of the blanket induce bottle bombs itself?

Sorry Im a noob lol thank you

By wild, do you mean wild yeast and bacteria? Or did you use a commercial yeast to ferment?
 
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