Bottle Carbonation Equipment?

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Rankinstein

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Okay so I'm yet another newbie to home brewing. Between helping more experienced friends brew, books and instruction from my LHBS, and all of the tips in this forum I feel like I have a decent handle on brewing at the beginner level, at least.

It seems that most people either fall into the bottle conditioning camp or the keg camp. I want to stick with bottles for the foreseeable future, but it seems like half of the waiting is just for the bottles to carbonate. I've read through the threads that talk about why breweries are able to go from grain to bottle in such a short time and one major reason seems to be the fact that they carbonate their bottles.

So if I wanted to go this route instead of bottle conditioning, what equipment do I need and how do you go about it?
 

Revvy

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You can't not unless you keg, force carb and fill the bottles from the keg with a beer gun...if you are going the natural route you are stuck with a living micro-organism, yeast..and they are in charge, not us....

Believe it or not, once you get a pipeline going, you will not worry that it often takes a minimum of three weeks for it to carb. It really is a new brewer issue. Once you have 2-3 batches going at various stages, you will be finfishing drinking a batch just when another one is at a peak.

Bottle carbing is not like making coolaid...you are dealing with Mother nature, and she has her own agenda.

And don't forget, carbonation is only half the issue...bottle conditioning is equally important...you can have a fizzy beer and it can still be green and taste like a$$.

ANd you will find, that it is really, really worth the wait.

I leave 99% of my beers in primary for a month...then I bottle...and right now I can't get 70 degrees in my loft to save my life...so I don't expect ANY of my beers to be carbed on time....so in the interim, I buy mix sixers of various beers to try as research for the next beers I plan on brewing and to build up my bottle stock.

I wrote this the last time a noob wanted to know how to push the clock forward.


For Example, I brewed my Pumpkin Ale for Thanksgiving on Labor Day...figuring at 8 weeks, I MIGHT have some ready for Holloween...But they were still green, so I only brought a couple to my annuual Halloween thingy, along with a sampler of commercial pumpkins...BUT come Turkey Day the beer was fantastic, and was a hit at the holiday.

Right now this is my current inventory...

Drinking....IPA, various bottles of Oaked Smoked Brown Ale, Smoked brown ale, Poor Richard's Ale, Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde (but as a Lager,)
Avoiding....Marris Otter/Argentinian Cascade SMaSH (It sucks)
Bottle Conditioning..... Chocolate Mole Porter, Belgian Dark Strong Ale, Peach Mead
In Primary.....Schwartzbier, Vienna Lager
Bulk Aging....Mead
Lagering....Dead Guy Clone Lager

Pretty much anything still in Primary or Lagering I will not be drinking til the end of March, but more than likely April....The Mole Porter needs a minimum several more weeks as well....but the Belgian Strong is prolly going to need 3-6 months to be ready...

The Swartzbier has 3 weeks more in primary, then another month lagering, THEN 3 weeks at least in the bottles...

Some weeks I take a break from my own beers to drink a couple sixers of samplers, so I don't drink ALL my current and other ready beers before the others comes online....Plus I'm craving a couple of styles that I don't have ready (like Vienna Lager) so I will make a bottle run....I also get to try new styles to come up with new ones to brew down the line.

And I'm also probably going to brew something this weekend...don't know what yet...maybe a low abv mild that I would only leave in primary till fermentation is stopped then bottled..so hopefully in a month they will drinkable.....
But do you see...you too one day will have a pipleine....and the wait will be nothing...you will have things at various stages...

This quote from one of my friends sums it up....

The nice thing is to get to a point in your pipeline where you are glancing through your BeerSmith brew log and realize that you have a beer that you have not even tried yet and it has been in bottle over 6 weeks. This happened to me this weekend. The beer was farging delicious.
Patience is a virtue, Padwan.



:mug:
 

android

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Believe it or not, once you get a pipeline going, you will not worry that it often takes a minimum of three weeks for it to carb. It really is a new brewer issue. Once you have 2-3 batches going at various stages, you will be finfishing drinking a batch just when another one is at a peak.
it's true. well put revvy.
 
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