bottle bombs?

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Opivy

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Didn't realize it and bottled a little bit early.

OG was 1.040 and I bottled at 1.010

should I expect anything scary to happen?
 
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Opivy

Opivy

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Opivy

Opivy

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what kind of swallow are we talking about gold?

also forgot to mention this is the first time I primed with plain sugar. (well actually it was some organic sugar from trader joes.. looked kinda weird - but i Used 2/3 cup for the 5 gallons)

I'm thinking I'll be okay since it was close to the FG but in reality I'm still new to this stuff.
 

Mosesdanger

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Golddiggie said:
What is the airborne speed of an unlaiden swallow?
In order to maintain air-speed velocity, a swallow needs to beat its wings forty-three times every second..

:mug: :-D
 

Golddiggie

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Sounds like you bottled too early and possibly primed heavy... I always weigh the priming sugar being used before making the solution... Otherwise, you really don't know how much you're adding. Volume measurements are notoriously inaccurate when it comes to dry items (like sugar, grains, etc.)...

I started priming with honey, and have since shifted over to raw cane sugar (turbinado/dememera)... I've also selected my desired CO2 volume level, and then used the amount of sugar to get there. Plenty of sites will help you out in that aspect... As will most of the brewing apps out there. Well, at least the decent ones will. :D
 

windbreaker123

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Sorry had 1 to many and just read your responses. Sounds good and it should be fine. Sorry I couldn't help it!! I mean really ! Uupper babs ahole? I had to do it sorry!
 
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Opivy

Opivy

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sure is.

Do you have any links about calculating priming sugar? I've read a few posts about desired c02 level but that seems over my head.

I've been sticking to just the 3/4 cup of corn sugar until last night when I used plain sugar. (well organic)

so, how do you think these things are gonna turn out? Not too worried about it, and since I haven't seen anything about exploding stuff in this thread I'm gonna at least relax on that end.
 

windbreaker123

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Basic rule of thumb for us that don't measure weight is 3/4 cup corn sugar and 5/8 table sugar for a normal brew.
 

Golddiggie

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A couple of good places to look for how much sugar to prime with, both for the brew style you have to bottle, and to the CO2 volumes are:

Beer Recipator
Bottle Priming Widget

I also use the aspect in Beer Smith, but check against at least one other site to see what I get. As long as the calculations are either the same, or close enough (I often split the difference, or make a judgement call depending on how big the difference is) then it doesn't matter.

You can get a good digital scale these days pretty damned cheap. So, there's no real reason to not weigh the sugar. The way I see it, if you've taken the time, effort, and care with the brew from the start, why not show that same amount of care at the finish? Also, with using one of the calculation tools, you really don't need to worry about over carbonating a batch. Well, unless you prime for 5 gallons and have less than 4 gallons of beer to bottle, and you make the priming solution for a high CO2 volume amount. Just a rough example... If you figure on getting 2.5 CO2 volumes, in 5 gallons of 66F brew, using 4-3/8oz of sugar. But, you only have 4 gallons of brew to actually prime and bottle (using the same amount of sugar), you'll actually get more like 2.93 CO2 volumes in the brew. Depending on the bottles you're using, that could be dangerously close to their failure point (or over their tolerances)...

I know there are plenty of people that have gotten away with just scooping sugar into a pot of water and priming with it, without bombs. Personally, I'd rather not risk it. I also want to make sure I'm priming the brew to where I want it to be. That extra amount of customization is just another aspect (IMO) of home brewing. Just like how people that keg set their pressures to where they want the brew to be (for carbonation, and serving)...
 
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Opivy

Opivy

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hehe I have a couple of digital scales - but as I was saying. I dont' know anything about what kind of C02 volume I'm aiming for in my beer.

So far I've just been priming 3/4cup corn sugar per 5 gallons no matter what kind of beer it is.
 

C-Rider

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Has anyone had any success priming with those little Cooper's priming sugar candies?
I used some on my last batch of Cooper's Wheat Beer. Not ready to drink yet. What I've tasted seems OK but it's only been 2 weeks and is kind of sweet, but that has nothing to do w/the Cooper's cubes.

The only reason I used them was they came in the kit and I had paid good money for them. :)
 

Golddiggie

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Has anyone had any success priming with those little Cooper's priming sugar candies?
Negative there... I don't use 12oz bottles, so (from what I've heard) I'd either need to cut some of them to add to my main bottles (16oz) or do more math with them... Not worth the effort IMO... Especially when I can simply weigh the sugar, put it into some water, boil it up real quick, then cool it down fast (sink of cold tap water does it fast in my area) and prime with that.

BTW, Opivy, most brewing software packages also have the CO2 volume ranges for each style in their list. The sites also have the range listed. You could target the middle of the range initially, and then decide for the next time you brew that style... It's not rocket science after all, just a tiny bit more precision for your batch... IMO, it's worth the few extra minutes (if that for me) to get the batch primed where I want it... Then it's just a matter of waiting ~3 weeks before chilling down the first bottle and seeing where it's at... So about 3-1/2 weeks from bottling before the first one is in the glass... :rockin:
 
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