Boiling temperature

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roylee

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Question for one of you experts. I normally AG using an outdoor LP burner, therefore back off during the cold weather months (Iowa). We have a kitchen setup in the basement my wife uses for canning, so I decided to try it, not knowing if the gas range would boil 6 gallons but figuring if it didn't I could finish outside. I seemed to get an active but slow rolling boil. When I checked the temp found it to be 209F. Tried another thermometer and got 208, and the range could not get it any higher. I went ahead and boiled and it's fermenting nicely and will know for myself in a month or so, but any predictions? Our elevation is about 1100 feet, if that makes a difference. Under those conditions is a 208-209F boil hot enough? Or as long as it's bubbling does it matter? Thanks
 

Grinder12000

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From my ONE experience with a lazy boil my porter turned out more of a amber.

HOWEVER - I am NOT sure if that was the reason. it has good flavor but tastes very watered down - I think it was a Extract with steeping grains - no mashing involved so I can not see how anything could have gone wrong besides the boil being weak.

Please let us know how it comes out as this has bugged me. I've never had THAT problem since I made sure I have GOOD boils.
 

TeleTwanger

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every 1000ft above sea level subtract 2 degrees....A boil is a boil is a boil, don't worry about then temp.
 

Bopper

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The goal is to get a good rolling boil. This facilites maximum hop utilization and the boil-off of DMS. With that said, as long as your wort is boiling you'll be fine.
 

BierMuncher

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Some will say a boil is a boil. I'd guess you have an adequate boil if it is turning over, bubbling and steaming good. An aggressive boil helps to reduce DMS (corn flavor).

I always get a good hard boil to help produce hot break and yield a "cleaner" tasting beer.

Here's what my boils look like:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hYqVfPn6mA]YouTube - Keggle on the Boil[/ame]
 

TeleTwanger

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What classifies a boil though ????
H20(in the form of steam) escaping to the atmosphere via bubbles classifies a boil. I agree that a hard boil is better than a simmer,although a simmer (190F)I believe is technically a boil too since H20 is escaping though small bubbles. Thats why they recommend a good rolling boil, and one of those you will know when you see it. The temp is still 212F but the movement and agitation of the wort is increased dramatically.If you have to ask what a rolling boil is then you aren't getting one.

edit: the video, there ya go! That's a good rolling boil.

edited for scientific accuracy
 

jkarp

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O2 escaping to the atmosphere via bubbles classifies a boil. I agree that a hard boil is better than a simmer,although a simmer (190F)I believe is technically a boil too since o2 is escaping though small bubbles.
There's no O2 involved. Those bubbles are vapor (gas). Boiling is the phase change of matter from liquid to gas.
 

Grinder12000

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The reason I asked was my second batch I was pretty timid with the boil (after a VERY aggressive 1st batch).

While there was movement it was a . . . .relaxed boil and THAT batch seemed WAY watered down.

Newbie mistakes and all that. I fixed that problem but I've never figured out what caused that batch to turn out so watered down.
 

TeleTwanger

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There's no O2 involved. Those bubbles are vapor (gas). Boiling is the phase change of matter from liquid to gas.
You're right...I was thinking of o2 being boiled off but yes h20 just goes from liquid to gas via a physical change, not chemical...And I suppose if O2 and H2 were created this would be bad.
 

wildwest450

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Some will say a boil is a boil.
And I would say poop to that!:D
My last few batches I have been doing hard boils (like bm's video) my beers have been tastier and clearer, I swear it. The batch I just finished up, I started with 8 gallons and boiled off to 5.5 in 60 minutes,
 

Chriso

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I'll play devil's advocate, though --- as far as measured temperature is concerned, a boil is a boil.

At my altitude, boiling is 209˚-210˚F. I can't boil at 212˚F because the liquid doesn't heat up any further (without resorting to a pressure vessel, of course) because it's already at its boiling temp.

A hard rolling boil is still better, in my opinion, than a soft boil. Carry on.
 

Yunus

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If you search you can find a thread about building an insulation blanket for use with Stove tops to achieve a boil with the kind of volume required for AG. If you can already get a slow boil I wouldnt think it would take much to make that a rolling boil.
 
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roylee

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Thanks all... I'll at least look into the insulated cover.... if for no other reason than that I like the looks of the big boil I get with the turkey burner and feel uneasy with the slow roller on the stove top. I'm making a couple of batches with the slo-boil though to see if I can notice a difference.
 

Monsterc

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Some will say a boil is a boil. I'd guess you have an adequate boil if it is turning over, bubbling and steaming good. An aggressive boil helps to reduce DMS (corn flavor).

I always get a good hard boil to help produce hot break and yield a "cleaner" tasting beer.

Here's what my boils look like:

YouTube - Keggle on the Boil
I see your burner is helping a lot with your boil.
It has way more light blue flames than mine.
What brand is it?
 

TeleTwanger

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Another 'Advocatus Diaboli' back in the day Bass reportedly never boiled hard but rather, simmered their worts for as long as 3 hours.
 

dontman

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Yet another devil's advocate post. I may be wrong but I am pretty sure that the amount of sugar suspended in the water changes the properties of the water where boiling can get to higher temps. I know that sugar will start boiling at 212 at sea level and continue to rise in temp all the way up to over 300 if you keep throwing heat into it. Last week my water and sugar mix hit 265 degrees on the stove.
 

Moonshae

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every 1000ft above sea level subtract 2 degrees....A boil is a boil is a boil, don't worry about then temp.
Not entirely true, the temp plays a role. 2 degrees won't matter, but 6,000 or 7,000 feet up, and your boil is at 200 or lower...you have to boil longer for the same effects.
 
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