Boil Experiment - Kitchen Stove 6.25 gallons

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BADS197

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Takeing bets on how long, if at all, it will take to boil 6.25 gallons of water.

My kettle, 8 gallon, sits perfectly across two of the burners. I'm doing this to see if getting a burner for outside on the patio is necessary.



I hope this works but in looking at it.. thats a LOT of water for a kitchen stove.
 

Bobby_M

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I'm betting it's going to take about 1.5 hours to reach boil from 120F (which I assume is how hot your tap gets). The typical stove burner runs 9,000 BTU while a turkey fryer is at least 40,000.
 
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BADS197

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I started with cold water from the sink but THAT is a very good idea!!!

I never thought about pulling water from the hot water side... I could crank the hot water heater up a bit and get a jump start.

OUTSTANDING IDEA

Water was around 70 degree when I started and it's at 120 degrees in 20 minutes.
 
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BADS197

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140 degrees at 28 minutes (keep in mind it big enough to have two burners blasting away on it)
 

JustDave

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If (when?) you eventually switch to AG, you can start heating your first runnings while sparging, it speeds the process up.

I put the lid on partially while it's coming up to a boil, then I remove it once it's boiling.
 

NateKerx

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This sounds like pretty much what I do with my keggle. My burners seem pretty powerful for a range top, and if I cover the water while it heats it takes me about 70 minutes to get a low boil going, which as good as it gets for me.
 
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BADS197

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70 Degrees to boiling @212 - 1hr 3m
Removing lid the temperature settled at 210

Added wort chiller, temp dropped 5 degrees with 3m to reach 210 again.

Cooling 6.5 gallons from boil took 17 minutes to 100 degrees.

Drained the water from kettle noteing a temp increase and that the water on the top 1/3 of the kettle was still quite hot. I'm not sure how much longer it would have taken to drop the temperature to 100 degrees or less.

I'm assumeing that 5 gallons will be easier to chill since the top of the volume of water will be closer to the chillers top. I didn't want to run the water for another 20 minutes just to find out.

Anyone know how long it should take to drop temps to an acceptable range, say for a carboy without it breaking?

I assume the goal of a chiller is to get the wort down quickly to around 100 degrees?
 

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70 Degrees to boiling @212 - 1hr 3m
Removing lid the temperature settled at 210

Added wort chiller, temp dropped 5 degrees with 3m to reach 210 again.

Cooling 6.5 gallons from boil took 17 minutes to 100 degrees.

Drained the water from kettle noteing a temp increase and that the water on the top 1/3 of the kettle was still quite hot. I'm not sure how much longer it would have taken to drop the temperature to 100 degrees or less.

I'm assumeing that 5 gallons will be easier to chill since the top of the volume of water will be closer to the chillers top. I didn't want to run the water for another 20 minutes just to find out.

Anyone know how long it should take to drop temps to an acceptable range, say for a carboy without it breaking?

I assume the goal of a chiller is to get the wort down quickly to around 100 degrees?
The goal of the chiller is to chill the wort to pitching temps- say 65-75 degrees. 100 degrees is WAY too hot. It'll take a full day for it to reach pitching temps.
 

TheSpoon

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70 Degrees to boiling @212 - 1hr 3m
Removing lid the temperature settled at 210

Added wort chiller, temp dropped 5 degrees with 3m to reach 210 again.

Cooling 6.5 gallons from boil took 17 minutes to 100 degrees.

Drained the water from kettle noteing a temp increase and that the water on the top 1/3 of the kettle was still quite hot. I'm not sure how much longer it would have taken to drop the temperature to 100 degrees or less.

I'm assumeing that 5 gallons will be easier to chill since the top of the volume of water will be closer to the chillers top. I didn't want to run the water for another 20 minutes just to find out.

Anyone know how long it should take to drop temps to an acceptable range, say for a carboy without it breaking?

I assume the goal of a chiller is to get the wort down quickly to around 100 degrees?
Were you moving the chiller around the pot while cooling the water?
 
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BADS197

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Were you moving the chiller around the pot while cooling the water?
I wasn't moving it around.

I just let it sit on the bottom of the kettle and I know that 100 degrees is too hot for pitching.

I assume by your comment that I'm suppose to move the chiller around? I didn't think of that but there is a cutout in the lid to allow the chiller to stick through with the lid on and there is enough play to allow me to move it up and down... so definately something to take into consideration.

:rockin:

I think if I'd moved it around it would have fallen quicker to 70-80 degrees.

This was a successfull test of my stove, the kettle and I've learned a lot from just this thread in the way of suggestions and info.

many thanks!

Is there anything else I might be missing?

thanks
jake
 

ChshreCat

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I wonder if the cost of the electricity you used running two burners on high for 2-3 hours every time you brew would pay for a good gas burner and a few takes of propane? :D
 

devaspawn

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I used to brew on the glass stove top, too. I found that IF I boiled 3 gallons in one pot straddling burners and then brought another 2 or 3 gallons up to boiling straddling the other 2 burners I would reduce my my boil time dramatically. I would pour the boiling water from my secondary pot into my primary pot while it was boiling and the whole thing was boiling again within seconds.

:tank:
 

MadDwarf

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I'd be kinda reluctant to drink water from the hot tap. I've torn apart several old hot water heater tanks, and they've usually got a good thick layer of rust, sediment, and other generic sludge stuffs built up on the bottom. I imagine that most of the nasties get filtered out by grains or hops, but still seems like a step backwards in water quality.

Less of an issue if your water heater is fairly new, and no issue at all if you have a tankless water heater, of course.
 
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BADS197

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I wonder if the cost of the electricity you used running two burners on high for 2-3 hours every time you brew would pay for a good gas burner and a few takes of propane? :D

It's a gas stove.
 

TheSpoon

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I wasn't moving it around.

I just let it sit on the bottom of the kettle and I know that 100 degrees is too hot for pitching.

I assume by your comment that I'm suppose to move the chiller around? I didn't think of that but there is a cutout in the lid to allow the chiller to stick through with the lid on and there is enough play to allow me to move it up and down... so definately something to take into consideration.

:rockin:

I think if I'd moved it around it would have fallen quicker to 70-80 degrees.

This was a successfull test of my stove, the kettle and I've learned a lot from just this thread in the way of suggestions and info.

many thanks!

Is there anything else I might be missing?

thanks
jake
Sorry, I guess I could have said a little more in my post. Yes, moving the chiller around in the wort(water) will help cool it faster. For proof just test the water output from the IC. There are some chillers that are designed to move the wort in a circular pattern also, take a look HERE for an example. Just a warning though, you might get chiller envy and have to buy a march pump also.
 
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BADS197

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Thanks Spoon...

I really like that link also... hmmm I live right next to home depot and I have a 2.5gallon corny that's empty sittin in the bedroom.

I might make a trip to home depot tomorrow and see how much copper pipe is going for.

I have two pumps for water that were used in my old water cooled computer setup a couple years ago... one is brand new :)

hmmmm

:)
 
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BADS197

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I have a buddy of mine who used to do plumbing as a job and I showed him the fancy home made wort chiller and he says that would be easy.

He's going to dig out his equipment from storage and in the next couple weeks we are going to make one.

I've only had experience with one electric stove at my parents house they bought in colorado. The altitude plus the crappy output of the stove made cooking a challenge. Yes it should boil faster at altitude, but it still took forever due to the electric stove top.
 
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I didn't think of that but there is a cutout in the lid to allow the chiller to stick through with the lid on and there is enough play to allow me to move it up and down... so definately something to take into consideration.
jake
I caught that you are using a lid while chilling. You do not want to do this. I can't think of what it is (DMS?) but there is an off-product you don't want to trap while cooling.

Correct me guru's if I'm mistaken
 

devaspawn

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I thought that was only during boil. I could be wrong but I think that any during active cooling which should take about 30 minutes or less (steam rising only happening during the first 10 minutes or so) you won't really have to worry about DMS.

:tank:
 

T-Hops

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I believe that DMS is produced when temperatures are above 120 F. Once below that temp you can put the lid on your kettle and not have to worry about DMS.
 
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