German Pils Bo Berry Pils (West Coast Pilsner)

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deadwolfbones

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The DH from the OP/SoCal recipe isn't really that big, at least compared to modern hazies. But several of us have noticed a significant increase in bitterness post-DH.

I've used fairly soft "standard" lager profiles for both of my attempts. I wonder how HPB treats their water for this beer? My next attempt I'm going to keep to a similar profile to see where it lands with the Andech's strain. May be worth doing a second attempt with a slightly higher chloride/sulfate ratio, but not to hazy levels, if the bitterness is still too pronounced.
I'd strongly encourage emailing Bob Kunz to ask about the water. He's very friendly/receptive, in my experience.
 
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hopfenstopfen

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I'm looking for some input on dry hopping practices for this style. What has worked for you so far?

I have a batch of a Pivo Pils clone that just finished fermentation. The recipe in BYO calls for dry hopping at day 4. So, I would think there is definitely yeast present and very likely some fermentation processes still going on. I'm inclined to crash this thing for several days to drop as much yeast as possible, then bring it back up to 60F and add dry hops.
 

drewmuni8

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I'm looking for some input on dry hopping practices for this style. What has worked for you so far?

I have a batch of a Pivo Pils clone that just finished fermentation. The recipe in BYO calls for dry hopping at day 4. So, I would think there is definitely yeast present and very likely some fermentation processes still going on. I'm inclined to crash this thing for several days to drop as much yeast as possible, then bring it back up to 60F and add dry hops.
I just made a second batch and did this, 58F rather than 60 though. Still not getting the kind of aroma i want but i think i might need to move some hops from WP to DH.

More general ?'s
- What is the percentage of hops folks are using for their whirlpool versus their dryhop? In total i used 4 oz of hops for both (2.5 gallon batch, double for you 5 gallon'ers) but split it and went 2oz in whirlpool and 2 oz in the dry hop. I'm thinking of going 1.5/2.5 or 1/3.
- Has anyone tried a Czech yeast for this? I've been using 34/70 and want to try Imperial and know they have a German and Czech strain.

Cheers!
 

Nick Poggetti

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Here's my latest go, using some 2020 Nelson. Notes at the end about what I'd like to change for next time.

Brew Method: BIAB
Style Name: Pilsner
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 10 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 11.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.045
Efficiency: 70% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.011
ABV (standard): 5.29%
IBU (tinseth): 24.89
SRM (morey): 2.72
Mash pH: 5.3

FERMENTABLES:
20 lb - Pilsen Malt 2-Row (100%)

HOPS:
2 oz - CZ Saaz, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.2, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 12.72
5 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at 170 °F, IBU: 12.17
6 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Strike, Temp: 150 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 12 gal

YEAST:
White Labs - German Lager Yeast WLP830
Starter: Yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 76.5%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Temp: 50 - 55 F
Fermentation Temp: 50 F
Diacetyl Rest @ 68 for a few days
Lager at kegerator temps for a while, I think I let it go 3 weeks before I tasted it.
Pitch Rate: 1.75 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: Spunding
I fermented and served from the same keg, floating dip tubes are my jam.

WaterProfile: Yellow Balanced - Bru'n Water

Resized_20201102_172316.jpeg



Things I love about this beer
  • The head/foam is the best I've ever had on any beer I've made. Super proud. It lasts a long time, too. I think the spunding really helped with it.
  • Super easy to drink. Clean, no diacetyl that I can sense, pretty darn tasty.
  • I've got two full kegs worth just waiting to be drunk.

Things I want to change/tweak for next time
  • It finished a little sweet. I'm going to mash lower, and try to dry it out a little more next time. Also change the water profile to "Bru'n Water - Yellow Dry"
  • I didn't quite hit the West Coast Pilsner style. More hops next time!!!! I think both bittering and aroma for sure.
 

hopfenstopfen

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Here's my latest go, using some 2020 Nelson. Notes at the end about what I'd like to change for next time.

Brew Method: BIAB
Style Name: Pilsner
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 10 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 11.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.045
Efficiency: 70% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.011
ABV (standard): 5.29%
IBU (tinseth): 24.89
SRM (morey): 2.72
Mash pH: 5.3

FERMENTABLES:
20 lb - Pilsen Malt 2-Row (100%)

HOPS:
2 oz - CZ Saaz, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.2, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 12.72
5 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at 170 °F, IBU: 12.17
6 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Strike, Temp: 150 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 12 gal

YEAST:
White Labs - German Lager Yeast WLP830
Starter: Yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 76.5%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Temp: 50 - 55 F
Fermentation Temp: 50 F
Diacetyl Rest @ 68 for a few days
Lager at kegerator temps for a while, I think I let it go 3 weeks before I tasted it.
Pitch Rate: 1.75 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: Spunding
I fermented and served from the same keg, floating dip tubes are my jam.

WaterProfile: Yellow Balanced - Bru'n Water

View attachment 705279


Things I love about this beer
  • The head/foam is the best I've ever had on any beer I've made. Super proud. It lasts a long time, too. I think the spunding really helped with it.
  • Super easy to drink. Clean, no diacetyl that I can sense, pretty darn tasty.
  • I've got two full kegs worth just waiting to be drunk.

Things I want to change/tweak for next time
  • It finished a little sweet. I'm going to mash lower, and try to dry it out a little more next time. Also change the water profile to "Bru'n Water - Yellow Dry"
  • I didn't quite hit the West Coast Pilsner style. More hops next time!!!! I think both bittering and aroma for sure.
Nice! Any tasting notes? How'd the 2020 Nelson come out?
Have you had the pilsner featuring Nelson by Modern Times? Man, I loved that beer.
 

Nick Poggetti

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Nice! Any tasting notes? How'd the 2020 Nelson come out?
Have you had the pilsner featuring Nelson by Modern Times? Man, I loved that beer.
A few tasting notes: Light, grainy/pilsneryish (like that made up word?) Some residual sweetness, a little too much in my opinion as noted... Want to dry it out a little more and hopefully 'crisp' it up a little. Clean lagerish character, no diacetyl (maybe just a tiny hint in the foam, but barely). Very minor fruitiness I think coming from the Nelson.

I think I'm going to up the carbonation a little.

The 2020 nelson is delicious. This is my second batch with it...first being a 9% hazy IPA. See some more info on that bad boy. Very proud of that one.

I have not had any of that Modern Times. The only Nelson beers I've had this year with the 2020 crop are some of Cellarmaker's Double Mt. Nelson, which I found my IPA came pretty close to that beer. Also a Humble Sea Pilsner, which I was hoping to try and come close to with this pilsner as well. Unfortunately I didn't get too close... I mentioned I was kinda far off from the west coast style, I think I need to up the hops, shift that whirlpool to flameout maybe?

All in all, a very very good beer.
 
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deadwolfbones

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Here's my latest go, using some 2020 Nelson. Notes at the end about what I'd like to change for next time.

Brew Method: BIAB
Style Name: Pilsner
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 10 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 11.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.045
Efficiency: 70% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.011
ABV (standard): 5.29%
IBU (tinseth): 24.89
SRM (morey): 2.72
Mash pH: 5.3

FERMENTABLES:
20 lb - Pilsen Malt 2-Row (100%)

HOPS:
2 oz - CZ Saaz, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.2, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 12.72
5 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Whirlpool for 0 min at 170 °F, IBU: 12.17
6 oz - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Strike, Temp: 150 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 12 gal

YEAST:
White Labs - German Lager Yeast WLP830
Starter: Yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 76.5%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Temp: 50 - 55 F
Fermentation Temp: 50 F
Diacetyl Rest @ 68 for a few days
Lager at kegerator temps for a while, I think I let it go 3 weeks before I tasted it.
Pitch Rate: 1.75 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: Spunding
I fermented and served from the same keg, floating dip tubes are my jam.

WaterProfile: Yellow Balanced - Bru'n Water

View attachment 705279


Things I love about this beer
  • The head/foam is the best I've ever had on any beer I've made. Super proud. It lasts a long time, too. I think the spunding really helped with it.
  • Super easy to drink. Clean, no diacetyl that I can sense, pretty darn tasty.
  • I've got two full kegs worth just waiting to be drunk.

Things I want to change/tweak for next time
  • It finished a little sweet. I'm going to mash lower, and try to dry it out a little more next time. Also change the water profile to "Bru'n Water - Yellow Dry"
  • I didn't quite hit the West Coast Pilsner style. More hops next time!!!! I think both bittering and aroma for sure.
Beautiful beer, man. I really need to work on another version, myself.
 

dirty_martini

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Just came across this thread as I’ve been playing around with this. I didn’t go full west coast pilsner, but I took a little more delicate approach. If you’re in California, I would compare it more to Enegren Lagertha, which is a very traditional pils with Saaz as it’s core, but adds a little mosaic so you get that classic saaz flavor, but a little of that mosaic berry and citrus that surprises you. Here’s my most recent recipe:

SG 1.048
FG 1.010
5% abv
35 ibus
98% bestmalz pils
2% weyermann melanoidin
Mash @150F
.5oz mt hood 90min
.75oz mt hood 30 min
2.8oz mt hood WP 20min @ 170
2oz Idaho 7 DH @ 55F 3 day
.5oz mt hood DH @ 55F days
omega Bayern lager (Augustiner)
Started ferment @48F. After 2 days raised to 52F. Once I got past 50% attenuation I raised to 62 to finish and for D-rest.
Went more German water vs the very soft czech water profile. Ended up with around this estimate.
ca 66
Mg 4
Na 0
Cl 56
So4 100

came out very German pils like, but then the Idaho 7 stonefruit and black tea tannin comes through. It’s a subtle character but that’s what I wanted.

A little note on Timbo. I’ve known Bob for over 10 years and talked to him about his west coast pilsners. When I asked him about Timbo he said they dry hop it at the same rate as their IPAs, so it’s 3lbs or more/bbl. If you want to replicate Timbo, I would plan on probably closer to 7-8oz dry hop per 5g batch. Also, I know that Bob is a big fan of German Saphir hops, so I would guess that’s the German hop that’s in the boil

FC434903-2B35-4F82-AA3A-C10B6F7F62E3.jpeg
 
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dirty_martini

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I don’t know what it is about the Augustiner strain but I have made the worst lagers with that yeast. I’ve used the Wyeast, White Labs, and Inperial versions and they’ve all produced terrible beers. That being said a ton of people use and love it and it’s probably the 2nd most popular commercial lager strain for craft breweries in the US so I don’t really know what to say. I pitch a ton of yeast, oxygenate with a stone, add yeast nutrient, pitch cold and let warm slightly, have dialed water profiles, step mash, blah blah blah. Gotta have close to 40 lager brews by now. I get lots of sulfur every time. Never had sulfur issues with any other yeast. I don’t ever warm my lager fermentation’s past 54 other than Augustiner. It definitely likes it warmer than most strains which is why a lot of craft breweries use it.

Imperial sells the Andechs strain for pros as Pilgrimage I believe.

I can’t say enough good things about it. I don’t really have a big desire to try many more. I just put some East Coast Yeast Kellbier on a stir plate but after that I probably will just go back to using the Andechs strain. Just found a Homebrew shop in CO that had three vials of Inland Islands version of it so I nabbed them.

Gave a pitch to a buddy who was headed brewer at a top 50 US craft brewery. Moved on and starting his own place. Was set on Augustiner until he tried the pitch I gave him on a small pilot batch. Was blown away with how clean and soft and balanced it was and how fast it cleared.
i love the Augustiner strain. I used both imperial harvest and omega Bayern (I prefer the omega). Never had any sulfur. Never had a diacetyl issue. Just clean lagers with every fermentation. I always start cold around 48 for the first 2 days just until I see activity. Then raise to 52 until I get to 50% attenuation. Then raise a couple degrees a day until I hit 62 where I hold at least 3 days and to a D-test. I keep it there until I pass, and step the temp down 3 degrees a day until I get down to the mid 30s where it will finish lagering. A friend of mine is a brewer that’s won numerous medals at both GABF and WBC and that’s the schedule he gave me to follow. He said he doesn’t like crashing as the yeast will continue to clean up on its slow decent.
 
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deadwolfbones

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Just came across this thread as I’ve been playing around with this. I didn’t go full west coast pilsner, but I took a little more delicate approach. If you’re in California, I would compare it more to Enegren Lagertha, which is a very traditional pils with Saaz as it’s core, but adds a little mosaic so you get that classic saaz flavor, but a little of that mosaic berry and citrus that surprises you.
Nice, I love that Enegren!
 

Genuine

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Looks great! I'll have to put this down as a recipe to make soon for the Spring. Also - Awesome Blog, just spent the last hour reading through your brews!
 
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deadwolfbones

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Looks great! I'll have to put this down as a recipe to make soon for the Spring. Also - Awesome Blog, just spent the last hour reading through your brews!
Thanks, man! I need to post more often.

Be sure to read through the thread and see everyone else's experiences. I'm working on v3 of mine, still tweaking a lot of stuff. When I get a version I really adore I'll update the original post. For now I'd say don't use cryo hops and aim for more DH than WP hops. Maybe add a bit of noble hops in the kettle.
 

cuda6pak

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Thanks, man! I need to post more often.

Be sure to read through the thread and see everyone else's experiences. I'm working on v3 of mine, still tweaking a lot of stuff. When I get a version I really adore I'll update the original post. For now I'd say don't use cryo hops and aim for more DH than WP hops. Maybe add a bit of noble hops in the kettle.
What don't you like about using cryo in this recipe?
 
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There was bitterness and a sharp green pepper note to my first attempt at this beer (mentioned in the linked blog post) that I've since come to associate with beers that use a large amount of cryo hops. If you do use cryo, I'd strongly suggest using them in the DH and not the WP stage. I used them throughout the initial batch and I think that was a mistake.
 

cuda6pak

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Good to know. I've always skewed my DH towards cryo (and now lupo) instead of the WP. This style can really accentuate bitterness depending on where you put it.
 

cuda6pak

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Just came across this thread as I’ve been playing around with this. I didn’t go full west coast pilsner, but I took a little more delicate approach. If you’re in California, I would compare it more to Enegren Lagertha, which is a very traditional pils with Saaz as it’s core, but adds a little mosaic so you get that classic saaz flavor, but a little of that mosaic berry and citrus that surprises you. Here’s my most recent recipe:

SG 1.048
FG 1.010
5% abv
35 ibus
98% bestmalz pils
2% weyermann melanoidin
Mash @150F
.5oz mt hood 90min
.75oz mt hood 30 min
2.8oz mt hood WP 20min @ 170
2oz Idaho 7 DH @ 55F 3 day
.5oz mt hood DH @ 55F days
omega Bayern lager (Augustiner)
Started ferment @48F. After 2 days raised to 52F. Once I got past 50% attenuation I raised to 62 to finish and for D-rest.
Went more German water vs the very soft czech water profile. Ended up with around this estimate.
ca 66
Mg 4
Na 0
Cl 56
So4 100

came out very German pils like, but then the Idaho 7 stonefruit and black tea tannin comes through. It’s a subtle character but that’s what I wanted.

A little note on Timbo. I’ve known Bob for over 10 years and talked to him about his west coast pilsners. When I asked him about Timbo he said they dry hop it at the same rate as their IPAs, so it’s 3lbs or more/bbl. If you want to replicate Timbo, I would plan on probably closer to 7-8oz dry hop per 5g batch. Also, I know that Bob is a big fan of German Saphir hops, so I would guess that’s the German hop that’s in the boil

View attachment 705572
Sounds fantastic. Is that recipe for 5 or 10gal?

I also used Mt. Hood throughout the boil on my last attempt along with the Andech's strain and was happy with how it came out. That strain really seemed to keep the bitterness a little more in check than when I used 34/70, and I liked the bit of extra body it provided.

Any more secrets you can pull from Bob? :ghostly:I went through most of his interviews and he seems pretty consistent that Saphir/Opal hops are used only in the boil, and the big DH is all citra/mosaic, and 34/70 is the lager strain. One thing I did notice is that if you look on a cohumulone chart, Saphir and Opal are basically at the bottom. I wonder if that helps curb some of the "harsh" bitterness a lot of us can get out of this style based on the lager yeast and large DH charge?

Based on that info I'm going to try all Saphir in the boil and Nelson/Citra as the DH to change it up a little bit.
 

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I just tried my hand on one of these. I did hallertau mittlefrau in the boil, some galaxy in the whirlpool and 1oz citra cryo in the dry hop. I was going to also do an oz of mosaic cryo in the DH but I decided to hold off since it was my first one and I didn't want to overdo it. I wish I had though and next time I'll ramp up the dry hop some. It turned out nice though. It's definitely a pilsner but with more citrusy hop character. I'm looking forward to playing around with it further. Cool idea and thanks for sharing
 

dirty_martini

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Sounds fantastic. Is that recipe for 5 or 10gal?

I also used Mt. Hood throughout the boil on my last attempt along with the Andech's strain and was happy with how it came out. That strain really seemed to keep the bitterness a little more in check than when I used 34/70, and I liked the bit of extra body it provided.

Any more secrets you can pull from Bob? :ghostly:I went through most of his interviews and he seems pretty consistent that Saphir/Opal hops are used only in the boil, and the big DH is all citra/mosaic, and 34/70 is the lager strain. One thing I did notice is that if you look on a cohumulone chart, Saphir and Opal are basically at the bottom. I wonder if that helps curb some of the "harsh" bitterness a lot of us can get out of this style based on the lager yeast and large DH charge?

Based on that info I'm going to try all Saphir in the boil and Nelson/Citra as the DH to change it up a little bit.
5.5gals (makes up for loss in dry hop)

ive been trying to use American ingredients whenever possible (I plan to switch to an American craft maltster like Mecca grade or admiral one the recipe is dialed in). So I’ve tried out mt hood and Sterling hops to good effect. Like hallertau and saaz, but with softer spice and a touch more citrus. I kinda want to try out Santiam and liberty as well, while incorporating some modern American hops. I have a Japanese style rice lager, but I’m doing a cashmere dry hop to add some melon and citrus. I’m I’ve been going for subtle additions, but I think I might try to go full west coast next time.

as for Bob, all I know is he loves saphir, they dry hop the lagers like IPAs, and they dont do the extended lagering time either. Beyond that i don’t know much.
 

cuda6pak

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Has anyone trialed lagering before adding the DH load, vs adding the DH load shortly after D-rest (or soft crash from D-rest down to ~55), then kegging and waiting for carbonation & clearing?

In one of the podcasts, Bob mentioned that Timbo was a 3.5 week beer, and because it was an intentional hoppy beer that their is no lagering after DH and it's packaged/served immediately. Which makes me think there is some sort of short lagering phase done for ~2 weeks since 34/70 should be done fermenting and D-rest in ~7 days, and gives 3-4 days for DH -> Brite -> Package.

Wondering if anyone has done both ways and noticed any objective difference between the two. I sort of agree with what @couchsending said earlier in the thread in that the subtleties of any sort of lagering character and nuance should be blown out by a 3#/bbl DH load, but was still curious and wanted to pose the question.
 

drewmuni8

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Has anyone trialed lagering before adding the DH load, vs adding the DH load shortly after D-rest (or soft crash from D-rest down to ~55), then kegging and waiting for carbonation & clearing?

In one of the podcasts, Bob mentioned that Timbo was a 3.5 week beer, and because it was an intentional hoppy beer that their is no lagering after DH and it's packaged/served immediately. Which makes me think there is some sort of short lagering phase done for ~2 weeks since 34/70 should be done fermenting and D-rest in ~7 days, and gives 3-4 days for DH -> Brite -> Package.

Wondering if anyone has done both ways and noticed any objective difference between the two. I sort of agree with what @couchsending said earlier in the thread in that the subtleties of any sort of lagering character and nuance should be blown out by a 3#/bbl DH load, but was still curious and wanted to pose the question.
Yes! I'm going to give this a go next batch. I just made another batch to where my lager yeast character is non existent due to a good d-rest and substantial dry hop. Though as the beer has gotten better body character from lagering the hop character is starting to fall. I just invested in a dry hop keg with a screen so i can go loose, so fermenter into a dry hop keg but lay off adding the dry hop after a two week lager period would probably give you best of both worlds in terms of fresh hoppiness and lager character.
 

drewmuni8

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image_67206657.JPG


Here's that last batch, a little over 3 weeks out since grain. "Pils Americana"

2:2:1 Medusa, Zappa, Sabro, about 17.5% flaked rice. Super lime-y character that is definitely dominated by Sabro, I don't get any coconut character that i always hear of. 60% hops where in the dry hop while the rest were in the whirlpool/boil. I finally got that hop character that i wanted that wasn't dominated by lager yeast, but as I said above, I'm going to lager first then dry hop to try and have the freshest hop character I can get. Ill probably do corn instead of rice next time, and some Bru-1 lupomax doesn't sound bad either :D

On a commercial level, I've been trying a bunch and the one that sticks out to me the most is Green Cheek's "Titan Pils". It honestly beats the HPB ones and others I've had at this point, though they are all excellent. Cheers!
 

dirty_martini

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View attachment 715627

Here's that last batch, a little over 3 weeks out since grain. "Pils Americana"

2:2:1 Medusa, Zappa, Sabro, about 17.5% flaked rice. Super lime-y character that is definitely dominated by Sabro, I don't get any coconut character that i always hear of. 60% hops where in the dry hop while the rest were in the whirlpool/boil. I finally got that hop character that i wanted that wasn't dominated by lager yeast, but as I said above, I'm going to lager first then dry hop to try and have the freshest hop character I can get. Ill probably do corn instead of rice next time, and some Bru-1 lupomax doesn't sound bad either :D

On a commercial level, I've been trying a bunch and the one that sticks out to me the most is Green Cheek's "Titan Pils". It honestly beats the HPB ones and others I've had at this point, though they are all excellent. Cheers!
greencheek Pils titan is exclusively Motueka. So it’s kinda NZ pils but brewed like the dry hopped American pils. I think the GC beers are more subtle and traditional in intensity, while using newer hops. Local Import with hallertau blanc, Hüell melon, and saphir is amazing as well.

I’m carbing up a dry hopped rice lager as well. I went 30% flaked rice so it’s crazy light in color. Dry hopped with a touch of cashmere. Hoping to try some of it tomorrow. If it’s ready I’ll post it.

oh, and give your beer a month and I bet the coconut comes through. I’ve noticed that sabr is coconut really starts to shine with the citrus and tropical fruit character starts to mellow. Seems like the coconut has more staying power.
 

cuda6pak

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A heads up for anyone wanting to use the Andech's strain we've talked about a bit in this thread (aka Wyeast Lager X) or for anyone searching in the future. Propagate lab sells the strain as MIP-620, and you can order a 1bbl pitch for $30 (1mil/ml/*P). They keep it in stock at all times and can basically ship out the same day. You can choose from overnight or 2-day shipping ($75, $35 for me respectively). So, if you brew larger 10gal batches and up, it's a great deal and time saver from building up multiple starters. This is the first time I've used the strain from them, but I pitched ~90-95% of the 1bbl pitch into 11.5gal of an NZ Pils and had fermentation activity within 4hrs @ 48*F. They've also got some interesting homebrew sized yeast strains available too on their site.
 
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deadwolfbones

deadwolfbones

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Just came across this thread as I’ve been playing around with this. I didn’t go full west coast pilsner, but I took a little more delicate approach. If you’re in California, I would compare it more to Enegren Lagertha, which is a very traditional pils with Saaz as it’s core, but adds a little mosaic so you get that classic saaz flavor, but a little of that mosaic berry and citrus that surprises you. Here’s my most recent recipe:

SG 1.048
FG 1.010
5% abv
35 ibus
98% bestmalz pils
2% weyermann melanoidin
Mash @150F
.5oz mt hood 90min
.75oz mt hood 30 min
2.8oz mt hood WP 20min @ 170
2oz Idaho 7 DH @ 55F 3 day
.5oz mt hood DH @ 55F days
omega Bayern lager (Augustiner)
Started ferment @48F. After 2 days raised to 52F. Once I got past 50% attenuation I raised to 62 to finish and for D-rest.
Went more German water vs the very soft czech water profile. Ended up with around this estimate.
ca 66
Mg 4
Na 0
Cl 56
So4 100

came out very German pils like, but then the Idaho 7 stonefruit and black tea tannin comes through. It’s a subtle character but that’s what I wanted.

A little note on Timbo. I’ve known Bob for over 10 years and talked to him about his west coast pilsners. When I asked him about Timbo he said they dry hop it at the same rate as their IPAs, so it’s 3lbs or more/bbl. If you want to replicate Timbo, I would plan on probably closer to 7-8oz dry hop per 5g batch. Also, I know that Bob is a big fan of German Saphir hops, so I would guess that’s the German hop that’s in the boil

View attachment 705572
Brewed my attempt at this one yesterday, with Saphir in the boil; Saphir, Motueka, and Mandarina Bavaria in the WP, and Motueka and Mandarina in the DH. Will report back on how it comes out.
 

dirty_martini

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Brewed my attempt at this one yesterday, with Saphir in the boil; Saphir, Motueka, and Mandarina Bavaria in the WP, and Motueka and Mandarina in the DH. Will report back on how it comes out.
my next brew will be a full attempt at the west coast pils, but I’m going to use NZ hops. I’ll use some Sterling I have for the boil hops, but hit it with a big charge of riwaka in the whirlpool then a big dry hop of riwaka with a little Waimea
 
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