Blowoff question

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pmkealiher

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When using a blowoff assembly, is there a time when a regular airlock should be used to replace the blowoff? Or if your fermentation pushes through your airlock, should you replace with a fresh airlock? I used a blowoff on my last brew and a lot of crap came through the hose and into the bucket of water. I just left it like that for a week and a half, and when I when I went to transfer it, it smelled really bad. Could the beer in the bucket have been infected and then traveled through the hose to infect the rest of my beer? Thanks.
 

Kaz

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I generally use the blow off until the crazy part of fermentation is done and switch it out for an airlock. If the blow off bucket/container really gets nasty, swap it out or stick the hose in a container of water while you clean out the bucket. Same goes for the airlock, if it starts to get pushed through the airlock, I switch it out. If the airlock would clog, look out for a krausen bomb! :rockin:
 

dnslater

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Seems unlikely that your fermentor would suck liquid through the hose, although possible. I would typically put an air lock on after about 48 hours, which so far is typically when my rapid fermentation has slowed.
 

pcollins

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+1 to all of the above.

I keep an eye on my primary fermentation so I can see as soon as the blow off tube is unnecessary. At that point I definitely swap out the tube for an airlock. It makes the tube easier to clean if you get it sooner and there is less likelihood of the bucket going skanky.

That said, if it does go rancid on you there is little likelihood of that getting into the beer. There is enough positive pressure from the CO2 being created even after the kraüsen has fallen that there is very little chance of that getting back into the beer.

No worries.
 

Kaz

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One thing, it is very possible for the blowoff liquid to get sucked back into the fermenter, especially if there is no temp control. If the carboy cools down and you lose the positive pressure inside, it will start to suck back.
 

stratslinger

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One thing, it is very possible for the blowoff liquid to get sucked back into the fermenter, especially if there is no temp control. If the carboy cools down and you lose the positive pressure inside, it will start to suck back.
+1

On a buddy's first attempts at lagers, we placed the fermenters into his lagerator with blow-off assemblies still attached. Our bucket was full of bleach water.

As he stepped down the temperature for lagering, we created a vacuum in both carboys. And lets just say bleach water and yeast don't coexist too well... :(

If you plan to leave your fermenter somewhere where its temperature could drop significantly, or you intentionally drop its temperature, replace that blow-off with an airlock ASAP!!!
 

unionrdr

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I remove the blow off assembly as soon as initial fermentation dies down. Replace with airlock filled with cheap vodka. No worries then.
 

Kaz

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+1

On a buddy's first attempts at lagers, we placed the fermenters into his lagerator with blow-off assemblies still attached. Our bucket was full of bleach water.

As he stepped down the temperature for lagering, we created a vacuum in both carboys. And lets just say bleach water and yeast don't coexist too well... :(

If you plan to leave your fermenter somewhere where its temperature could drop significantly, or you intentionally drop its temperature, replace that blow-off with an airlock ASAP!!!
Also, you don't need a ton of liquid in the blowoff container. If you try to make sure you don't have more liquid than can fill your blowoff tube, then it can't get sucked in. The liquid will get sucked up the tube and then it will suck air, break the vacuum and the liquid will fall back into the blow off container.
 

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