Blow off tube alternative

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Virginia_Ranger

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So my airlock has been "bubbled up" into and filling with yeasty bi-product three times and I don't have quick access to a blow-off tube. Should I just keep cleaning and re-sanitizing it or is there something else I can do?

Also, the temperature has been in the 66-70 range the whole time (mostly 66-69) so I'm not sure the root cause. I will say I noted slightly less head space before putting the lid on but that much more than usual.

Side note, could filling the airlock with less solutions help at all?
 

FloppyKnockers

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If you can't do a blow-off tube, the best thing to do is either ride it out or remove the airlock until fermentation subsides.
 

JONNYROTTEN

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Unless its overflowing fast just pull the airlock every once in awhile and rinse it out. I've had brown water airlocks a few times.
 

Anyhowe

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You can always bag the carboy and ferment in a corney under pressure. Better beer is the result as well.
 

JONNYROTTEN

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You can always bag the carboy and ferment in a corney under pressure. Better beer is the result as well.
I always wonder how you ferment 6 gallons in a 5 gallon keg for 5 gallons finished beer. That's a real question. Is everyone doing 4 gallon batches?
 

Sailingeric

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Head space is your friend. I use Brewcraft 8 gallon buckets and have plenty of room for krausen and have never had a blowout.
 

RPh_Guy

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So my airlock has been "bubbled up" into and filling with yeasty bi-product three times and I don't have quick access to a blow-off tube. Should I just keep cleaning and re-sanitizing it or is there something else I can do?

Also, the temperature has been in the 66-70 range the whole time (mostly 66-69) so I'm not sure the root cause. I will say I noted slightly less head space before putting the lid on but that much more than usual.

Side note, could filling the airlock with less solutions help at all?
Take off the airlock and tie a towel around the neck of your fermenter to catch any krausen that overflows.
If you have *any* chance of bugs flying around, cover the opening with a towel, cheese cloth, or similar.
Put the airlock back on when the overflow subsides.

Krausen protects the beer from contamination & oxygen.

And yes, your temperature might be too warm but some types of yeast are more just prone to create excessive blow-off.
 

Anyhowe

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Actually they way I use to do it was to bag the airlock during the first couple days Simply put a large diameter (forget what size jambs in there) clear flexible hose, about 3 feet long, just into the neck of carboy where the airlock plug would normally sit. Put the other end of the hose in a deep bowl with the open end submerged in water. All blowoff will go into the bowl and no contamination can get into the beer because the water barrier. After the krausen starts to subside slap on an airlock. Easy peasy
 
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Virginia_Ranger

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You can always bag the carboy and ferment in a corney under pressure. Better beer is the result as well.
Thanks for all the replies! I am currently fermenting in a corny but have been scared of doing the under pressure method as it seems like its rushing the beer and also don't temps need to be in the mid 70s? Maybe I have undue fears on that one, I am open to thoughts.
 

Anyhowe

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Thanks for all the replies! I am currently fermenting in a corny but have been scared of doing the under pressure method as it seems like its rushing the beer and also don't temps need to be in the mid 70s? Maybe I have undue fears on that one, I am open to thoughts.
No negative effect on the beer. In fact in large breweries with tall fermenters this happens by default. No need to do anything different. The only reality is that IF the temps get too high there is no detrimental effect. I recently had a fermentation flitch and temps went over 80 degrees. no ester off taste. But just do it normally at Your norml temps. I like the fact that it is totally encapsulated and I transfer under pressure with co2 so contact with air.
 
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