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Blasted yeast! Or was it something I did?

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kbelky

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On my 2nd brew. I accidentally put in 2 tablespoons or gypsum during the heat up of the boil (instead of 1 teaspoon). So the water hardness is probably through the roof. Second, I got the stock pot in the tub to try to cool it down after the boil. I only got it down to about 130 before I pitched the yeast. I now know I should've waited until the wort was down to around 70 before adding the yeast. The wort is now down to 72 degrees. No airlock activity, and no crud on top when I looked in the fermenter (20 hours later). I stirred it with a sanitized spoon to see if I couldn't get it going. Nothing yet.

I did aerate the wort before adding the yeast. It was a dry yeast that came with the ingredients kit. The yeast expiration date was 5/2005 :mad: I rehydrated exactly as the directions required.

My questions are:

1) Could the gypsum ruin the batch?
2) Could the yeast be dead from the high temp
3) If the answer to #1 is no, and #2 is yes, should I try to add new yeast... and how long after you boil can you add new yeast? I've seen posts that say they boiled 6 days ago, and people are saying the need to add new yeast if no fermentation is happening.

I really try to educate myself on new hobbies before I dive in; but, in brewing, it seems like there are so many variables involved... it's frustrating. I guess there are no facile solutions when you are a newbie! :)
 

patrck17

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I wish I knew the answer to this one. But I am even new-er then you are. I have read a lot in the last few weeks and I have never heard about anybody pitching at 130. I guess you can be the one to tell us if it can be done. If you don't get any activity though I think it will most likely be because of the temperature. I think that even 90's is too hot for yeast. Why exactly did you pitch at that tempurature? Did you get so ancy that you forgot to take a temp till after you pitched? Anyways sorry to hear the bad news, let us know how it turns out, and if you decide to pitch again, how that comes out too.
 

homebrewer_99

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Always in a hurry! I recommend you do more research and studying before investing more $$$ in your hobby. I don't want you wasting your dough.

Yes, I'd say you definitely killed your yeast. Actually, you didn't even give it a chance at 130F and sent it directly to slaughter.

Fermentation is a natural process. This means it can not be rushed. It takes it's own time.

Pitch more yeast. If you are using dry just sprinkle the yeast on top of the wort (do not hydrate) and cover. DO NOT STIR.

You didn't say what style you brewed. The gypsum will just add hardness to your water, but this may not be a bad thing - depending on the style.
 

andre the giant

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I concur. I think you basicallly cooked your yeast. That's bad yeast karma. Try to be a little nicer with your next packet of yeasties.

And, Don't be impatient with beer.
 
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kbelky

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Yep. This will never happen again! Go figure, though. I went to work today, came home 9 hours later, and the airlock is bubbling like mad. Maybe I just shocked the crap out of the yeast... and it started working after it 'came to'. :D Definitely buying a wort chiller this weekend!

Thanks for all your replies!
 

Kephren

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I'd save some of that yeast. I bet you just created a new strain that can withstand higher temperature pitching :) Natural evolution and all...
 

cygnus128

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I don't know...130 is definitely too warm but most ale yeast can survive at 100+ degrees. They are certainly happier in the high 60s - low 70s though :). I am very curious to know how this turns out. I have definitely pitched at 90ish before and had pretty good results...
 

patrck17

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SUPER-YEAST, you should culture it and patent it, then sell it to impatient brewers the world over.


Brew on.
 
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