Bitterness after dry hopping

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snarf7

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Recently brewed an Belgian ale that I whirpooled most of my hops. But when I tasted it before racking to the keg it was a little lacking on the flavor and aroma I was going for. So I figured I'd dry-hop right in the keg and get a little more out of it. I only added about 1 oz extra but I'm tasting it now after 2-3 days and it seems to have added a very sharp bitterness that I don't like. These were pellet hops, not the usual leaf hops I use for dry hopping, but I have a fine mesh tube around the dip tube to keep any particulate out.

Anyone else encountered something like this? Does it mellow with age or what? I don't always dry hop in the keg but I've never had this issue before.
 

bucketnative

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Very sharp bitterness sounds like suspended hops particulate. It can be finer than fine mesh.
 
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snarf7

snarf7

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Very sharp bitterness sounds like suspended hops particulate. It can be finer than fine mesh.
Hmmm, ok well last time I use pellets like that I guess...what to do now then? transfer it to another keg? or will it dissipate with time?
 

IslandLizard

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It will settle out in a few days to a week, but don't rock the keg. At that point you can blow off the first 2 pints or so with trubby beer and transfer the rest to a 100% liquid pre-purged keg using a liquid to liquid jumper hose. Then pull the QD off as soon as you hear it getting close to empty or when you see sludge going into the hose.

Alternatively, a finely woven doubled up woven muslin cloth (it's thick, you can't see through it) will filter quite a bit tighter, but that means tinkering inside your keg. Air exposure kills hoppy beers.
 
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snarf7

snarf7

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It will settle out in a few days to a week, but don't rock the keg. At that point you can blow off the first 2 pints or so with trubby beer and transfer the rest to a 100% liquid pre-purged keg using a liquid to liquid jumper hose. Then pull the QD off as soon as you hear it getting close to empty or when you see sludge going into the hose.

Alternatively, a finely woven doubled up woven muslin cloth (it's thick, you can't see through it) will filter quite a bit tighter, but that means tinkering inside your keg. Air exposure kills hoppy beers.
hmmm, thanks for the tips, I'll give it a week and pour off a few and see if that helps anything...I'm wondering if it will just settle out and stay on the bottom like when you have a little trub in the keg, it will eventually just sink to the bottom and stay there?
 

IslandLizard

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hmmm, thanks for the tips, I'll give it a week and pour off a few and see if that helps anything...I'm wondering if it will just settle out and stay on the bottom like when you have a little trub in the keg, it will eventually just sink to the bottom and stay there?
Yes, it settles out on the bottom together with yeast and stuff. As long as the keg doesn't get moved/bumped/swirled/transported, you can keep tapping from it after the sludge has been purged. It creates a divot in the trub around the diptube.
 
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