Quantcast

Best yeast for RIS?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

svthomas72

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2018
Messages
21
Reaction score
7
So, my favorite beer style is RIS, and I have an affinity for double digit abv. I have always had descent luck getting 12% or so from US-05, but I also feel like I am leaving too many sugars unfermented (it's a bit sweet still). If I could get it up to around 14%-16%, I think it would really bring out the roasted barley and chocolate rye flavors more. Anyone know of a yeast with similar flavor profiles to US-05 but can ferment to higher abv?
 

Dr_Jeff

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
557
Reaction score
126
Location
Henagar
After the flavor profile is set, ~48-72 hours in, add in WLP-099 high gravity yeast, and that will get you to where you want it to be. Also start increasing the temperature, the warmer temperature, will help keep the yeast active.

You didn't mention if it is all grain or extract or any of your process or mash temperature.
 

Cameron Gray

Member
Joined
May 6, 2018
Messages
21
Reaction score
20
Location
Cape Town
Was about to suggest the same. Get you profile right then finish fermentation with HA18, CBC1 or similar high gravity yeast.
 
OP
svthomas72

svthomas72

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2018
Messages
21
Reaction score
7
After the flavor profile is set, ~48-72 hours in, add in WLP-099 high gravity yeast, and that will get you to where you want it to be. Also start increasing the temperature, the warmer temperature, will help keep the yeast active.

You didn't mention if it is all grain or extract or any of your process or mash temperature.
It is all grain. I mash at 155 for 75 mins to get optimum mouth feel and abv combination. The additional yeast is a good idea. I hadn't thought of pitching a different kind of yeast. I also like the idea of increasing the temp. I moved it to secondary two days ago because I needed my SS Brewbucket for a WCIPA brewed yesterday, and when I racked to secondary, I moved it from the fermentation fridge (68 degrees) to my office (72-75 degrees). I may get some of that high gravity yeast to take a swing at this since I can just pitch it into secondary as I am not planning to keg the RIS until December.

Thanks for the advice!
 

Steveruch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
544
Location
Crescent City
Mash lower and longer and S-05 will get you past 12%. With the O G you are probably starting with leaving behind mouthfeel should not be an issue.
What is your normal O G and F G with this recipe? What is your actual recipe?
 
OP
svthomas72

svthomas72

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2018
Messages
21
Reaction score
7
Mash lower and longer and S-05 will get you past 12%. With the O G you are probably starting with leaving behind mouthfeel should not be an issue.
What is your normal O G and F G with this recipe? What is your actual recipe?
It's a monster grain bill. OG on this batch was 1.106 because I did not sparge enough and didn't get the full efficiency.

22 lbs​
Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM)​
Grain​
1​
81.5 %​
1 lbs 8.0 oz​
Chocolate Rye Malt (250.0 SRM)​
Grain​
2​
5.6 %​
1 lbs​
Caramel/Crystal Malt -120L (120.0 SRM)​
Grain​
3​
3.7 %​
1 lbs​
Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM)​
Grain​
4​
3.7 %​
1 lbs​
Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM)​
Grain​
5​
3.7 %​
8.0 oz​
Black (Patent) Malt (500.0 SRM)​
Grain​
6​
1.9 %​
2.00 oz​
Magnum [12.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min​
Hop​
7​
48.1 IBUs​
1.00 oz​
Nugget [13.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min​
Hop​
8​
26.0 IBUs​
0.50 oz​
Northern Brewer [8.50 %] - Boil 10.0 min​
Hop​
9​
3.1 IBUs​
0.50 oz​
Northern Brewer [8.50 %] - Boil 0.0 min​
Hop​
10​
0.0 IBUs​
 

lincolnubrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2013
Messages
85
Reaction score
9
I used yeast bry 97 yeast, 4 packs rehydrated. I also aerated twice once at pitching yeast then aerated about 6-8 hours after pitching. I had a og of 1.1389 and got me to 1.036 about 70% efficiency. Visble yeast activity about 24hr after pitching. I mashed at 152f.
 

Dr_Jeff

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
557
Reaction score
126
Location
Henagar
Why not just use WLP099 by itself?

I've never used it as the primary yeast, but from what I understand, there are much better yeasts flavor wise, that's why I've used it as a "finishing yeast"
 

couchsending

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,527
Reaction score
1,531
Why do you want the beer to finish that low? Do you know what breweries are targeting for FG on most big Stouts these days (even non Pastry stouts)?

I can’t imagine wanting something north of 10% to finish below 1.040.

you want more roast flavor add a lot more of those grains.
 

Northern_Brewer

British - apparently some US company stole my name
Joined
Aug 16, 2017
Messages
2,861
Reaction score
2,133
Location
UK
So, my favorite beer style is RIS, and I have an affinity for double digit abv. I have always had descent luck getting 12% or so from US-05, but I also feel like I am leaving too many sugars unfermented (it's a bit sweet still). If I could get it up to around 14%-16%, I think it would really bring out the roasted barley and chocolate rye flavors more. Anyone know of a yeast with similar flavor profiles to US-05 but can ferment to higher abv?
I'd question your premise - RIS is a style that is based on a single beer, the Barclay Perkins/Courage Russian Stout, which historically was about 1.100 OG. In the 19th century they were finishing at ~1.030 for 8-9% ABV in the 19th century, <1.020 for 10.5% ABV in the 1950s. So don't feel you have to go crazy on the ABV, and not going too low on the FG is a good idea IMO.

I would question the use of US-05, I think that's part of the problem, you'd be better off with a yeast that favours malt flavours over hop flavours. And just generally these kinds of beers suit a more characterful yeast - like British ones.

The obvious yeast to try is WLP540, a British yeast that's adapted to higher alcohol, allegedly at Rochefort who know a bit about strong dark beers...

You also need to make sure you're not stressing the yeast - it's no bad idea to use yeast that's fermented a lower-ABV wort (as most of the Belgians do) to get "warmed up" for the stressful task of fermenting such a concentrated wort. See this presentation for some other ideas :
https://quaff.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/HighGravityFermentation-1.ppt
 

ggriffi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
152
Reaction score
11
Location
Wright City
Why do you want the beer to finish that low? Do you know what breweries are targeting for FG on most big Stouts these days (even non Pastry stouts)?

I can’t imagine wanting something north of 10% to finish below 1.040.

you want more roast flavor add a lot more of those grains.
I'm curious about this. I use this recipe Ten fidy Clone with good results and it finishes below 1.040 @ 1.030, in Beersmith in comes in @ 1.027. Not arguing just trying to understand about this
 

tracer bullet

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
42
Location
Minnesota
I've always used the Wyeast Irish Stout. I start around high 90's / right at 100 gravity and end up around high teens to 20. 10% kind of zone. It's never stopped fermenting on me. I do a 2L starter which doesn't hurt. So much sugar in there it's going in just a couple hours and I have to use Fermcap to contain it.

My only issue is that it takes forever to flocculate, if I let it sit in the fermenter it's still suspended a month later. I guess it's OK, I never intend to drink it right away, but it's annoying that I can't even grab samples without being smacked in the face by the yeast flavor. I guess what I'm saying is - it's a working option, but not the best one perhaps.

I plan to try either the Dry English Ale option or even the Imperial A-10 Darkness next. I've seen good reviews for the Darkness but haven't really looked into it yet (i.e. if the reviews are from people who don't have much experience to compare it to). I've done a bit of searching and I think it's between those. They could be worth a look. Do consider a starter for sure.

I see your late hop additions, I've been doing that as well, but with Kent Goldings. I think I'm leaving them out next time. I love hops, and have had some heavy stouts that I liked the hops in. But I think for RIS, for me at least... I don't really want it beyond bittering. Personal opinion I guess. After long enough time a lot of that late hop flavor goes away anyhow.
 

cactusgarrett

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
1,830
Reaction score
524
Location
Madison, WI
It tends to finish a tad high in regular strength stouts for me, so i don't know if you'd like it in an imperial, but i'm VERY partial to Denny's Favorite. WY 1450
 
Top