Best method to carbonate a 1.75 gallon keg in 24 hours

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

YOpassDAmike

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Messages
103
Reaction score
2
What is the best method to carbonate a 1.75 gallon keg that is full of beer in a 24 hour timeframe? I've read a lot about carbonating kegs in a short time frame but it seems that the only input I can find online is dealing with 5 gallon kegs and not smaller kegs like my 1.75 gallon keg. I would assume that since I have a smaller filled keg, it would take less CO2 and time to carbonate the keg when comparing to a filled 5 gallon keg. Any help is much appreciated, thank you.
 

ba-brewer

I'm not Zog
HBT Supporter
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
11,478
Reaction score
5,548
Location
sf Bay Area
The same process for 5gal kegs works for small kegs. I would use serving pressure instead of higher pressure to make sure you don't over carb.

My little kegs carb up really fast at serving pressure in a couple days without doing any shaking/rocking or using higher pressure.

Edit: When I say same process I mean get the beer cold and pressurize then rock back and forth to speed up the carbonation process.
 

day_trippr

Get the shot ffs! Sheesh!
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
37,339
Reaction score
20,162
Location
Stow, MA
Start with our favorite carbonation table, find your beer temperature on the Y-axis, scan across that row to your desired carbonation level expressed as "volumes of CO2" (where 2.4-2.5 is middle of the road for ales), then run up that column to find the CO2 pressure that will eventually bring your beer to your chosen carbonation level.

You can then set your regulator to the specified pressure, hook up the keg, and shake/rock/spin the keg to continually expose the beer to the CO2 head pressure and accelerate the take-up of gas.
As you're doing this keep an ear "open" and when you cannot hear gas passing through the regulator/entering the keg, let the keg rest for awhile (30-60 minutes) then repeat the process.

In fairly short order (especially as it's only a couple of gallons) the beer will hit your chosen carbonation level...

Cheers!
 
Top