Belgium Candi / Tripple

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

floridarunner68

Active Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Location
New Port Richey, FL
I am making a Belgium Tripple with 11 lbs of Pale Malt Extract. My LBS didn't have clear candi. I bought a pound of dark, because I can't wait another two weeks for a shipment. Is it going to make a big difference? It will go into a keg when finished.
 

Bjornbrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2008
Messages
417
Reaction score
3
Location
St. Clair Shores, MI, USA, Earth, Sol System, Milk
The dark candi will make it Dubbel (sort of). Just use beet sugar...pretty much the same thing as clear, but waaaaaaay cheaper. :)

source - The guy at my LHBS told me not to buy Belgian Candi (from him) and go buy pioneet sugar instead, because there's no difference.
 

debaniel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2007
Messages
142
Reaction score
0
search the forums, there is a ton of info on adding candi sugar to your brew...

dark candi will definitely make your brew dark... adding beet sugar (basic table sugar) will work, but i wouldn't go any higher than 10 - 15% of your fermentables with straight table sugar (boiled in water to sanitize first, of course).

If you'd like to lighten your beer even more, make your own invert sugar. It's totally easy, and makes the sugar easier to eat for the yeast. If it's invert, you can go up to 20% of your fermentables without creating any unwanted flavors.

i'd save that dark candi for a future brew! it keeps for a long time, and if you like Belgian brews, you'll end up brewing a dubbel or strong dark eventually...
 

Bjornbrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2008
Messages
417
Reaction score
3
Location
St. Clair Shores, MI, USA, Earth, Sol System, Milk
I was told that there is a difference between table sugars, specifically cane sugar and beet sugar. That's why I used Pioneer sugar (produced in the great state of MI too!)...I guess beet sugar has less effect on the flavor compared to cane sugar.
 

ibrewdou

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2008
Messages
53
Reaction score
0
Location
lawrenceville ga.
:mug:consult with deathbrewer, he has excellent knowledge of belgians and his advice has helped me greatly. my belgians are all excellent and high in gravity, flavorful with nice head and lacing. also you must consider a big starter so you can hold back some starter for bottle conditioning with your priming sugar. there are some tricks o' trade for sure and patience is the virtue in belgians. but will be rewarded. try northern brewer for clear candi syrup. the syrup is the way to go. again, refer to the deathbrewer. :tank:
 

Saccharomyces

Be good to your yeast...
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Messages
5,438
Reaction score
152
Location
Pflugerville, Texas
Beet sugar (invert) is better if you can get it, the yeast will have an easier time digesting it since they won't have to manufacture invertase to break it down into simple sugars first. If you are planning on aging the brew, table sugar works fine, keep in mind if you use more than 5-10% it will give a jet fuel flavor to the brew when it is young but that wears off with age. Another option is to use corn sugar.

As long as your yeast have plenty of nutrients (Fermax or Wyeast yeast nutrient recommended for big beers anyway), they won't have any trouble digesting any sugar you throw at them, as long as you stay under 20% of the grainbill.

PS clear candi sugar is the same as table sugar, just more expensive. So you know.. ;)
 
OP
floridarunner68

floridarunner68

Active Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Location
New Port Richey, FL
I am making the Belgium Tripel that is on page 36 of the November 2000 issue of BYO. The Candi goes in at the beginning of the boil. I made a 1.5 qt starter using WLP500 Trappist Ale and 1.5 cups of golden light DME.
 
Top