Belgian golden strong (duvel-ish) advice on sugar.

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giraffe

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Im going to brew up a belgian golden strong this week, its not a style I usually brew, but I happened to brewed a 1.048 beer with he duvel yeast (1388?) and well, I have yeast to use. So i had a quick question; Im just going to use a simple grist of (1.082) 80%/20% (by extract) pils/sugar, the question, which sugar would give the driest most neutral flavor in this beer? Available I have:

white cane table sugar.
dextrose
2 lbs of ancient clear belgian candy rock sugar, I have no idea where it came from.
Corn sugar.
Or any other suggestion.

Will pitch a mr malty calc approved quanity of yeast, with o2, and ample nutrient. starting at 64, and slowly letting it ramp up. Will probably add sugar a week into fermentation or when it looks to be starting to slow.
 

chickypad

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Corn sugar is dextrose. I've used all of those and don't notice any difference personally in taste though I have heard some claim they do. Certainly doesn't seem to make a bit of difference in attenuation IME using them in known recipes.
 

blizz81

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Whatever you use, I'd suggest adding it to primary once peak fermentation has begun to ramp down a bit. I've used turbinado in a belgian golden strong this way with good results (down to 1.006)
 

Kevin-watkins

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Table sugar needs about 5 minutes in the boil min. So sugar will change from, I think glucose, to fructose and sucrose, belgian candy is already converted.
Finish at upper end of temp then cold crash for cleaning up the beer. Co2 volume is important for this style. Good luvk.
 

z-bob

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If you have the Belgian rock candy already, might as well use that. Otherwise I would use plain ol' white sugar, and put it in the kettle for the entire boil to give it a chance to invert (sucrose --> glucose + fructose)
 

Aristotelian

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I would go with the Candi too since you already have it. However, I was listening to the Jamil Show Belgian Blonde episode and he said to use whatever you have and is cheapest, you aren't going to taste a difference. I would assume this would hold true for Belgian Strong as well.
 

andrewmaixner

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Table sugar needs about 5 minutes in the boil min. So sugar will change from, I think glucose, to fructose and sucrose, belgian candy is already converted.
Finish at upper end of temp then cold crash for cleaning up the beer. Co2 volume is important for this style. Good luck.
Close: sucrose + heat + acid(catalyst) --> glucose + fructose
As you mention, yes, clear candi syrup is literally just something you can make on your stove, or in your boil kettle, in a matter of minutes at almost no effort and 1/10th the cost.

Similarly, the clear "rock" candy sugar is literally just TABLE SUGAR (sucrose) at 10x markup.

The darker stuff can also be made at home, but at that takes some effort and watching. I buy the 180L syrup for dark ales.

Anything that uses light/clear, I don't buy the marked-up version.
 
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