Belgian dubbel

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Ethan19993

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Experiences when brewing a dubbel? It'll be my first dubbel, and my second batch altogether. Any advice/what to look for. Also, just any knowledge you have about dubbels in general. Thanks!
 

grem135

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Give it plenty time to condition. I left mine in primary for 4 weeks and tasted the first after 4 weeks in bottle but it really started tasting good at 3 months. I saved a case for this winter.
 
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Ethan19993

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Did you transfer to a secondary fermenter, or only primary? I only have a primary as I'm still new to brewing.
 

DocScott

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What's your recipe? Yeast? All grain?

My best general advice is control your temps during fermentation and oxygenate/aerate well before pitching. Also, pitch enough yeast. Start low and Ramp up your temps as fermentation proceeds. Basically do everything you can to get your yeast to attenuate as much as possible. Once finished, be patient and save several bottles as they will get better as time goes on.
 

grem135

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^^^ this docscott is right on^^^

I don't secondary unless I do extended aging. My last brew bottled was in primary for 3 months due to life issues and it turned out great so I am not afraid of the long primary boggyman.
 
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Ethan19993

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DocScott said:
What's your recipe? Yeast? All grain?

My best general advice is control your temps during fermentation and oxygenate/aerate well before pitching. Also, pitch enough yeast. Start low and Ramp up your temps as fermentation proceeds. Basically do everything you can to get your yeast to attenuate as much as possible. Once finished, be patient and save several bottles as they will get better as time goes on.
Will this be a problem if I won't be able to control the temperature other than leaving it in a cool, dark place? What's an ideal temperature to leave it at in my circumstances, or should I opt for a different style since I don't have that capability as of now.
 

grem135

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Look up swamp cooler. I swap out a couple of frozen water bottles 3 times a day in summer and can keep temps in the low 60s. I use 20 oz and 1 liter bottles depending on what I need
 
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Ethan19993

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grem135 said:
Look up swamp cooler. I swap out a couple of frozen water bottles 3 times a day in summer and can keep temps in the low 60s. I use 20 oz and 1 liter bottles depending on what I need
Thanks for the advice! If that's not an option at this time, what would be a more complex beer that I could brew at room temperature (70-78) I just brewed a light bodied, golden ale, and am looking for something a little darker/ with a higher gravity.
 

DocScott

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Ethan19993 said:
Will this be a problem if I won't be able to control the temperature other than leaving it in a cool, dark place? What's an ideal temperature to leave it at in my circumstances, or should I opt for a different style since I don't have that capability as of now.
Ideal for Belgian would be to start it in the low/mid 60s and then ramp it slowly up to 74-78 to finish. Keep it around 64 for 5-6 days, then I'd go to 68 and let it climb slowly to finish around 75 or so. You can do this in a swamp cooler but its challenging. Having such struck temp control is not absolutely necessary but it sure helps control your flavor and attenuation which is paramount in a low finishing beer like a dubbel.

Other beers to make in warmer weather? Saison would be come to mind. You can really do almost anything though if you rig up a swamp cooler and keep the beer in the mid 60s by swapping ice filled bottles throughout the day.
 
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Thanks for the advice! If that's not an option at this time, what would be a more complex beer that I could brew at room temperature (70-78) I just brewed a light bodied, golden ale, and am looking for something a little darker/ with a higher gravity.
Some saisons like to ferment at those temps. I just finished a wheat ale that fermented at 79 for a week and it tastes pretty darn good! The saisons are a little more complex and traditional, and there are many Belgian variants if you're particularly interested in Belgians. I'm experimenting with using little to no special techniques or equipment for temperature control and letting my beers work at the ambient temperature of the house, and choosing beers that like the temps for whichever season. So in winter time when the house stays around 50-60 in the unheated rooms I'll be putting up some winter lagers. If you have a garage or other semi-insulated but unheated space you might just wait until November and lager the old fashioned way =]
 

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