Belgian Candi vs Table sugar??

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glockspeed31

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I'm going to brew a Ommegang Hennepin Saison and looking at the recipe, it calls for 2# light Candi sugar. Why should I use the Belgian sugar instead of 2# regular table sugar? Will there be much difference in the two?

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looneybomber

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If a sugar is not "cooked", IE it's clear, I don't see why you can't use regular table sugar. I've had other people on here tell me that same thing.
 

Calder

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Not much difference between table sugar and clear candi sugar or syrup.
 

lpdjshaw

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So after reading the above link I'm wondering if adding regular table sugar with around 15 minutes left in the boil will accomplish the same thing as the low ph wort will in essence be the added acid to invert the sucrose.
 

idylldon

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So after reading the above link I'm wondering if adding regular table sugar with around 15 minutes left in the boil will accomplish the same thing as the low ph wort will in essence be the added acid to invert the sucrose.
Won't be hot enough. The temperature range (260 - 275F) is really important for the reaction to happen.

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pdxal

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No difference except the cost. 40 cents/pound vs. ~$6/pound. Table sugar will invert in the kettle anyway, and sucrose/table sugar is fully fermentable after yeast cleave the glucose and fructose apart if it isn't inverted. Many Belgian breweries just use bags of table sugar per Brew Like a Monk.
Wikipedia says it can be done at lower than the above temps:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_sugar_syrup
 

idylldon

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Good info. I've always done it the old-fashioned way but will give the easier way a try the next time I brew my Belgian ales. I've always enjoyed inverting sugar, though, because it's pretty interesting to taste the difference and to see how quickly it actually happens. Brings out the geek in me I guess.

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sputnam

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+1 to making your own inverted sugar. kind of intimidating at first but then easy. i found it easiest to add at the end of the boil while it is still liquid.
 

mikeoholic

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I've always used table sugar in my Belgians and have never had a problem.


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TheZymurgist

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Sugars are covered in detail, from the worthlessness of clear candi sugar (it is pure sucrose just like table sugar according to the tests Victory Brewing had run on it) to unrefined and caramelized options. Despite its depth this section is devoted to replacing the flavor of dark candi syrup (which was not available in the States at the time), with the current availability of Dark Candi's products much of this information about sugars is more interesting for doing things besides replicating authentic Belgian flavors.
This is an excerpt from The Mad Fermenationist's review of Brew Like a Monk. In that book, Stan Hieronymus talks in detail about the different candi sugars. There is also a post on that site where he does a side-by-side comparison of different sugars. I suggest taking a look.

http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2009/02/book-review-brew-like-monk.html

From what I can tell unless you're talking about the darker sugars, it's best to save the money and go with simple table sugar. Sure the candi sugar is "invert" sugar as stated before, but the effect on the final product is the same.
 
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