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lostspring

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The information I read for beginning brewers is that Ale is the best choice to begin with, it is easier for newbies.
Is it only because of the higher fermenting temps or is there something else. I am refering mainly to the extract kits.
 

SumnerH

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The information I read for beginning brewers is that Ale is the best choice to begin with, it is easier for newbies.
Is it only because of the higher fermenting temps or is there something else. I am refering mainly to the extract kits.
Temperature control is a major issue, and it's just one more thing to worry about that's easier if you've gotten the rest of the process down with an ale first.

Also, many lagers are "cleaner" (have less big flavors of their own), which means that any small defect is going to be very apparent. If a hoppy or malty ale has a slight off-flavor, it'll be pretty well hidden by the ale's other big flavors. In a pilsener, it'll be right there in your face.

So waiting until you've brewed a couple of beers to get the hang of your sanitation, controlling your fermentation temperatures on the much easier ale scale, etc is just a good idea.
 

McGarnigle

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Lagers take longer as well (generally), however, lots of people brew lagers using ale yeast, which is fine.
 

dmob29

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I have been brewing for a few months and only doing ales due to the fact I don't have a spare fridge or something to get temps low enough to lager. There is a mess load of ales out there so I am totally fine with that!!

Lagers take longer as well (generally), however, lots of people brew lagers using ale yeast, which is fine.
:confused:
Uhm.... if you brew a lager with ale yeast, it then becomes an "ale" correct? Or I am missing something about the whole top/bottom fermentation process?
 

SumnerH

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:confused:
Uhm.... if you brew a lager with ale yeast, it then becomes an "ale" correct? Or I am missing something about the whole top/bottom fermentation process?
That's right. The kind of yeast you use is what defines whether it's a lager or ale.

But: Lots of people substitute ale yeasts into lager recipes to brew light, clean ales with many lager-like characteristics. They won't be like true lagers, but you can get some pretty light, clean blonde ales and the like.
 

dmob29

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Hope I didn't sound like an ass, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something!
 
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