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Beers with quick turn around times.

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Wolfsden

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I have run into a gap in my brewing schedule. I want to brew something flavorful but quick from kettle to keg. Any suggestions?
 

kjjohns5

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American Brown Ale? I've gotten mine carbed and ready in about 12 days. Turned out great. Once the diacetyl rest is over you can pretty much keg this beer. It really doesn't need 2 weeks of fermentation unless you're adding some sort of flavor to it at conditioning. You could brew it, let it sit for 8 days, cold crash it over night, keg it on the 9th day, set the carb to 30 psi, and let it sit for 2-3 days and it should be ready.
 

KyleWolf

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I agree with kjjohns5, it is especially true if you whip up an aggressive starter. My first batch ever, an amber ale, I used S-04 and it was done fermenting in seriously 5 or 6 days, (though I do recommend a few days extra to let the yeasties clean up after themselves).

I really feel any ale (except IPA with dry hop) under 1.070 can be ready in 2 weeks if you use a proper yeast starter.

I normally do 2 weeks primary, and then 1 day at 50PSI with occasional jostling of the keg. Turns out pretty well.
 

just2brew

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I usually brew a big batch of hefeweise when my pipeline runs low. I've gone from kettle to being on tap in two weeks. It's suppost to be cloudy so no need to cold crash or clear the beer.
 
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Wolfsden

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Great ideas guys! Thanks!
Kylewolf how did the banana bread beer turn out? I had one by Wells and was not impressed. But I liked the Idea of a super banana hefe.....
 

Airborneguy

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Definitely Hefe. You can probably get that in a keg in a week if you really wanted to. How about milds or bitters? There's an article in the recent BYO about session beers with some good recipes. All could be kegged and tapped pretty quickly.
 

Germelli1

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Definitely Hefe. You can probably get that in a keg in a week if you really wanted to. How about milds or bitters? There's an article in the recent BYO about session beers with some good recipes. All could be kegged and tapped pretty quickly.
I have got that article next up when I visit the throwne at home!
 
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Wolfsden

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When you guys do a Hefe what temp are you fermenting at? My last one was in the high 60's and I didn't get the flavor profile I was looking for.
 

barrooze

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wolfsden said:
when you guys do a hefe what temp are you fermenting at? My last one was in the high 60's and i didn't get the flavor profile i was looking for.
62f.
 

kjjohns5

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When you guys do a Hefe what temp are you fermenting at? My last one was in the high 60's and I didn't get the flavor profile I was looking for.
Ferment the first day at 60, then after 24 hours raise it to 64 for 12 hours, then raise it to 66-67 and hold it there for the rest of fermentation.

The fist day at 60 will give you lots of banana, the 64 will give you slight clove with some fruitiness, then the 66-67 will finish off with a perfect amount of clove so your finished product will be equal parts banana and clove, with some subtle but noticeable fruity notes.
 

Doog_Si_Reeb

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I made a pale ale that was very tasty in 2 weeks and 4 days from grain to glass. It was for a bachelor party in Vegas and the 5 gallon keg was kicked before midnight of the first night. The recipe was very similar to Ed Wort's Haus Pale Ale. I pitched a pack of S-04 and fermented at 65 and then kegged it and carbonated it.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f66/bee-cave-brewery-haus-pale-ale-31793/
 

zgardener

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Here here on the Hefe. I can get one fermented, kegged and on tap in as few as 7 days. I fermented my last one at 62, but hardly got any esters. I honestly like to do mine high, start at 66 with a 1 L starter (really to just get the yeast active and hungry, not really looking to boost cell count too much, then set the chamber to 72 after two days and let it free rise.
Keg at day 7, set PSI at 30 and cool it down to the 30's and shake every 10 to 15 min. Should be carbonated perfectly in an hour or so.

The new WLP090 San Diego Super Yeast is designed to be a quick turn around yeast similar to WLP001. I've heard of people finishing fermentation in 3 days or less with a healthy pitch/starter, so you may want to look into that.
http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/new_strain.html
 

shanecb

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When you guys do a Hefe what temp are you fermenting at? My last one was in the high 60's and I didn't get the flavor profile I was looking for.
Jamil Zainasheff is pretty adamant about brewing at 62 F for a hefe. I've done that, and it wasn't exactly what I was looking for, so something a bit higher at 68 F is more what I prefer. But if you've done that and didn't like it, give 62 F a try.
 
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Wolfsden

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I'm going for that big banana flavor and what I have read is that those esters are more prevalent at higher fermentation temps. I was going to try the brew belt for temps in the 70's. Am I way off on that?
 

zgardener

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I wouldnt take it over 70 for the first couple days, and wouldnt take it over 72 after that. Depending on how you pitch you could get some clove notes that may overpower the banana when you start too high.
 

ArcaneXor

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With hefeweizens, I do a 10-minute ferulic acid rest at 111, then step to 145 and 155. I ferment, usually with WLP 300, at 62-63 for three days, then let it free-rise. Very nice, balanced ester profile with banana, clove and a touch of vanilla, and developing some apple as the beer ages.
 

zgardener

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That sounds tasty, which yeast do you use? And what's the acid rest add to the final beer? Do you decoct or infuse?
 

ArcaneXor

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That sounds tasty, which yeast do you use? And what's the acid rest add to the final beer? Do you decoct or infuse?
The yeast is WLP 300 Hefeweizen Ale yeast. I step mash in my old 5-gallon stockpot using my propane burner, then pour the whole thing into my cooler mash tun in the end to lauter and sparge. Infusion and decoction would probably work just as well.

The ferulic acid rest is not the same thing as the acid rests that are discussed in some brewing books. I am not an expert, but apparently this rest produces the precursor that the yeast metabolizes into the clove-like esters. That allows you to ferment at a cooler temperature, but still get enough clove presence.
 

boostsr20

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Wheat beers and or Saisons. If you use something like the 3711 which ferments fast and isn't finicky about temps in the 80s you can have it done in under 10 days.
 
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Wolfsden

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So you guys are saying that the banana flavors are produced in the lower 60's and the clove is at higher temps?
 

barrooze

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I actually don't get a whole lot of banana in mine. More clove, but it's very subtle. Mine has a nice smooth, subtle, balanced flavor profile and was fermented at 62F for 4 days, then ramped up to 75 over the next 3. Went from grain to glass in 8 days.
 
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Wolfsden

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The caramel Macchiato stout sounds awesome. Have you done it before?
 
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