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gonzoflick

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Well I checked again locally on Beer Gas Prices and a found place that will fill a 20lb tank for $17 with beer gas!! This might not sound great to you all but the last time I checked pricing it was in the range of $50. He said he will fill my co2 tank too (lots of people will only fill nitrogen tanks) as long as I have the co2 to nitrogen converter for my regulator and that my tank wasnt owned by Coke or Pepsi (he actually said that).

Im wondering. has anyone here used beer gas on regular lagers or ales. I know it works well for stouts but I wonder how it would taste will my ales?


Thanks in advance.
 

bikebryan

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gonzoflick said:
Well I checked again locally on Beer Gas Prices and a found place that will fill a 20lb tank for $17 with beer gas!! This might not sound great to you all but the last time I checked pricing it was in the range of $50. He said he will fill my co2 tank too (lots of people will only fill nitrogen tanks) as long as I have the co2 to nitrogen converter for my regulator and that my tank wasnt owned by Coke or Pepsi (he actually said that).

Im wondering. has anyone here used beer gas on regular lagers or ales. I know it works well for stouts but I wonder how it would taste will my ales?


Thanks in advance.
I don't know if it will affect the taste, but you will certainly get less carbonation at a given pressure as the partial pressure of the CO2 in the mix is fairly low. IOW, you'll get flatter beer unless you crank up the pressure higher, meaning longer lines to balance the system, meaning.....I'm getting a headache thinking about it.
 

gnef

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correct, do not use it for 'regular' beers that you aren't going to put through the stout restricting faucet.

although, i suppose, if you were to pour from the stout faucet, you would have to use the beergas, but it would change the texture of the non-stouts tremendously. if you like that or not would be personal opinion though...
 
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gonzoflick

gonzoflick

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I appriciate the replies. I Think I will get the beergas if and when I start making stouts
 

bikebryan

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gonzoflick said:
I appriciate the replies. I Think I will get the beergas if and when I start making stouts
I'd only use the beergas if you also have a Stout faucet. If you don't there is no need for the beergas. The mix in this gas is to help force the stout through the restrictor plates in the faucet without increasing the carbonation. If you don't have that kind of faucet, the beergas really isn't necessary.
 
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