Beer bubbling after racking to secondary

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zpack

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I racked my blue moon clone to secondary yesterday after It hit final gravity. Today I went to check on it and it looked like this. This is my 4th brew and this is the first time it’s had bubbles.

bubbles.jpg
 

bluemoon737

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First off you are going to get hit with the "no need to secondary" comments but regardless you decided to do so. It is not all that unusual for yeast to get "awakened" after a racking event and result in some further activity. You mention that you hit final gravity...was that by consecutive stable readings or by the recipes' stated final gravity? If by the recipe, that is not always accurate (in fact I rarely if ever hit the stated final gravity). In any case, I wouldn't worry about it your beer will be fine.
 
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zpack

zpack

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First off you are going to get hit with the "no need to secondary" comments but regardless you decided to do so. It is not all that unusual for yeast to get "awakened" after a racking event and result in some further activity. You mention that you hit final gravity...was that by consecutive stable readings or by the recipes' stated final gravity? If by the recipe, that is not always accurate (in fact I rarely if ever hit the stated final gravity). In any case, I wouldn't worry about it your beer will be fine.
Thanks! Yeah I know most people don't secondary, I only did it because I am starting another brew today and want the bucket this was in. Yes, I used the recipe final gravity. Just worried me since my previous (while extremely limited) brews hadn't done this.
 

balrog

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@bluemoon373 said it best with reawakening yeast. Will happen especially if it's been only a week or so since brew day.
 
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zpack

zpack

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@bluemoon373 said it best with reawakening yeast. Will happen especially if it's been only a week or so since brew day.
Yeah, it's been just over 2 weeks since brew day.
 

bluemoon737

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Good reason to secondary then! :D Recipe FGs are based on everything being exact and there are way too many variables that could determine what the final attenuation is of a particular yeast strain/wort make up. Consecutive gravity readings is the only way to know for sure you have reached FG (and even then it is only true for those exact conditions...if you heat it up it will likely attenuate a little more, etc).

Again, nothing to worry about. Enjoy what will likely be a wonderful beer in the not too distant future. :)
 

Owly055

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The greatest concern here is with procedure, accuracy of gravity readings, etc. Yeast will awaken if it hasn't fully attenuated the brew, when you "shake it up" a bit, as with racking. My concern would be tracking down where things went wrong..... And there aren't too many possibilities. The first thing I'd look at what my yeast. Did you use the yeast called for in the recipe. I'd then look at my hydrometer as the culprit. Different yeasts have different levels of attenuation, and those are shown in charts you can find on the internet. Punch your recipe into Brewer's Friend (free to use online), and look at the different FGs listed as you change your yeast. It's a lot actually.

The real concern is with bottling. If you are being "fooled" about FG, you run the risk of grenading bottles. I'm pretty lackadaisical about this because I use EZ-Cap bottles which use the Grolsch type caps (wire bails), and are rated well in excess of 100 PSI. The seals will leak before the bottle explodes. Ordinary beer bottles are not capable of holding a lot of pressure, and are not consistent.

H.W.
 
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zpack

zpack

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The greatest concern here is with procedure, accuracy of gravity readings, etc. Yeast will awaken if it hasn't fully attenuated the brew, when you "shake it up" a bit, as with racking. My concern would be tracking down where things went wrong..... And there aren't too many possibilities. The first thing I'd look at what my yeast. Did you use the yeast called for in the recipe. I'd then look at my hydrometer as the culprit. Different yeasts have different levels of attenuation, and those are shown in charts you can find on the internet. Punch your recipe into Brewer's Friend (free to use online), and look at the different FGs listed as you change your yeast. It's a lot actually.

The real concern is with bottling. If you are being "fooled" about FG, you run the risk of grenading bottles. I'm pretty lackadaisical about this because I use EZ-Cap bottles which use the Grolsch type caps (wire bails), and are rated well in excess of 100 PSI. The seals will leak before the bottle explodes. Ordinary beer bottles are not capable of holding a lot of pressure, and are not consistent.

H.W.
I did use the yeast called for in the recipe, also I plan to leave it in the carboy for at least 2 more weeks possibly longer. I will look into that site also.

I keg my beer, so pressure is not as much of a worry.
 
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