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Beer already carbonated?!

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VincentK

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So after only 9 days of my newest Double IPA in primary I racked to secondary to dry hop and take a hydrometer reading, but to my surprise my beer is already fairly carbonated... almost enough to drink! Is this odd? Has this happened to anyone else?
 

Seedly

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This is normal during the fermentation process. By the time your done dry hopping and clearing, it will have gone flat. Thats ok, because thats why we bottle prime or force carb.
 

Cyclman

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Just CO2 that hasn't fully precipitated out in fermentation. Did you have stable gravity for >3 days, if not, it's still fermenting, you should leave it in primary.

Secondary is really a clearing "bright tank" once ferm is done. Many don't even bother.
 
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VincentK

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Well I understand that a secondary isn't exactly practical but I like to get the beer of the trub to let it clear some more. I know that the beer isn't done (especially after only 9 days) but I was just curious why the beer had already started picking up some c02! I'll keg it in another few weeks and I'm sure it'll turn out great since it already tastes great!
 

D3ling

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I hope I don't hijack this thread but what about over carb'd beer? Is there a way to tame them down? Crack the bottles open and then recap?
Bad idea?
 
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If you still have gas bubbles in your samples you should try to shake them out. If you take a hydrometer reading in a fizzy sample the reading will be artificially low due to the gas reducing the density of the sample.
 

Demus

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Am I missing something? I hope we all know he main byproducts of fermentation are alcohol and carbon dioxide. CO2 in a sample should be pretty obvious evidence that fermentation is still ongoing....
 

choosybeggar

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Demus said:
Am I missing something? I hope we all know he main byproducts of fermentation are alcohol and carbon dioxide. CO2 in a sample should be pretty obvious evidence that fermentation is still ongoing....
True but...CO2 remains in solution for a while once production ceases. This is true even in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. So CO2 bubble formation can mean either there is an active fermentation or that there was an active fermentation.
 

choosybeggar

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Thunder_Chicken said:
If you still have gas bubbles in your samples you should try to shake them out. If you take a hydrometer reading in a fizzy sample the reading will be artificially low due to the gas reducing the density of the sample.
I don't think dissolved CO2 significantly decreases SG. However CO2 bubbles clinging to the hydrometer bulb definitely increase its buoyancy causing artifactually low SG readings. For this reason I degas my samples before hydrometer readings.
 

afr0byte

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I don't think dissolved CO2 significantly decreases SG. However CO2 bubbles clinging to the hydrometer bulb definitely increase its buoyancy causing artifactually low SG readings. For this reason I degas my samples before hydrometer readings.
Perhaps you mean artificially high readings? Increased buoyancy would raise increase the gravity reading.
 
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Perhaps you mean artificially high readings? Increased buoyancy would raise increase the gravity reading.
It will read low if the beer is actually a mixture of liquid and gas. The mixture gravity will be less than that of the liquid by itself.

If you happen to get a ton of bubbles sticking to the hydrometer, then yes, you might see it go the other way.
 

afr0byte

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It will read low if the beer is actually a mixture of liquid and gas. The mixture gravity will be less than that of the liquid by itself.

If you happen to get a ton of bubbles sticking to the hydrometer, then yes, you might see it go the other way.
It might lower the reading slightly with CO2 in solution, but you're much more likely to see a higher than expected reading with a non-degassed sample because of the bubbles sticking to the side of the hydrometer, especially in a beer that's just finished fermentation (and hasn't been carbonated in a keg or bottle).
 
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It might lower the reading slightly with CO2 in solution, but you're much more likely to see a higher than expected reading with a non-degassed sample because of the bubbles sticking to the side of the hydrometer, especially in a beer that's just finished fermentation (and hasn't been carbonated in a keg or bottle).
I'll have to check it out with some club soda.

But the bottom line is - OP's beer is not done! Step away from the fermenter!
 

Yooper

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I'll have to check it out with some club soda.

But the bottom line is - OP's beer is not done! Step away from the fermenter!
Yeah, after 9 days I bet it IS done. A healthy and active fermentation is usually over by about day 5. The c02 bubbles will hang around quite a while, especially at cooler temperatures.
 
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Yeah, after 9 days I bet it IS done. A healthy and active fermentation is usually over by about day 5. The c02 bubbles will hang around quite a while, especially at cooler temperatures.
I thought we were supposed to keep things in primary until we qualify for AARP membership, and only then can we rack to secondary. :)

Seriously, I agree that the fermentation is probably over, but the extra time to clean up and let things settle out is still very helpful.
 

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I thought we were supposed to keep things in primary until we qualify for AARP membership, and only then can we rack to secondary. :)

Seriously, I agree that the fermentation is probably over, but the extra time to clean up and let things settle out is still very helpful.
Oh, sure, I never rack a beer until it's pretty clear (although, I rarely rack to a "secondary" anyway). I normally package beers at about 14-21 days old.

After fermentation finishes, the yeast continue to work for the next 24-48 hours or so, even digesting some of their own waste products (like diacetyl). Then, depending on the strain, the beer will start to clear.
 

Demus

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True but...CO2 remains in solution for a while once production ceases. This is true even in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. So CO2 bubble formation can mean either there is an active fermentation or that there was an active fermentation.
I realize that but he's talking about a DIPA after 9 days... I'm pretty sure it's not done...
 
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