Attempting to create my first batch of cider - a few questions

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REcidermaker

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First off I am glad to be on the forum!

I have always thought about brewing my own cider so it is awesome to finally try it!

A few questions though...

1. I am in college and I do not have access to a stove to pasteurize the cider. My mom went to Whole Foods today to pick up some PS, but I will not receive it until Wednesday or Thursday. I would rather it be non-carbed. With that said if I stick it in the fridge until I receive the PS, can it be described as "stopping time" in regards to the fermentation process?

2. After I add the PS I can bottle it up for my trip home...correct?

Thanks all
 

msabin

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I'll start by showing ignorance: what is PS?

If you've fermented the apple juice into cider -- and it's complete, just bottle it and you're done.
No need to refridgerate unless you want to drink it cold.

--Matthew
 
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REcidermaker

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I'll start by showing ignorance: what is PS?

If you've fermented the apple juice into cider -- and it's complete, just bottle it and you're done.
No need to refridgerate unless you want to drink it cold.

--Matthew
PS= potassium sorbate (created an acronym) haha



Thanks for the reply.

I am under the impression that if I bottle immediately after fermentation there will still be yeast within the cider which will cause my mason jars to explode.
 

Fossey

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Fermentation stops because the yeast have consumed all the fermentable sugars. True, there will be yeast remaining in the cider but unless you add more sugar (for carbonation purposes for example) they will not cause any issues.
 

Fizzycist

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Agree with Fossey. Let it finish fermenting all the way then just bottle it. Non-carbonated cider and mead is called "still" and is a perfectly acceptable final product. If you're into that sort of thing. :)

Oh, and it's probably a lot cheaper to order potassium sorbate from a brewing supplier like midwest or northern than buy it at whole foods. Pretty sure not even the air at that store is cheap.
 

Cider123

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Ah yes, the "how to end the cider process" thingy. I was there a few years ago before I realized that beer is easier to make and tastes better. Just me.

If you ferment it completely, it will not explode and will be non-carbed, but it will be very unsweet, dry. If your thinking, nice appley mild sweet cider, this won't be what you get. You'll have more white wine like stuff

If you back sweeten with sugar to add sweetness but dont stop the yeast you'll get bottle bombs.

If you back sweeten and kill the yeast with heat you'll be sweet but not carbed (maybe what you want) Refridge won't stop the yeast, only slow it down.

If you want what I was after, slightly sweet and carbed. Let's see, advice to me was to backsweeten, allow to sit at room temp checking every two days until the carb amount is right (be careful). Then when it is where you want it, heat the bottles up in a hot water bath for (I forget how long) and chill. This was at best, an inconsistent process as some bottles worked out fine, others carbed away too much (a dangerous situation), some turned to vinegar.

I can say that what you want is probably easier to make. You just want to be sure and kill that yeast with heat or chemically if you are going to add more sugar after fermenting. I make cider with fresh apples from an orchard and juiced them in a juicing machine, long and messy. Then a second batch with cider from Walmart. BOth tasted about the same. Make sure store bought cider does not have preservatives in it or it will kill the yeast before they start.


Good luck. Last week I poured out my cider and used the bottles to make beer:) I need to change my forum name I think
 
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REcidermaker

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Fermentation stops because the yeast have consumed all the fermentable sugars. True, there will be yeast remaining in the cider but unless you add more sugar (for carbonation purposes for example) they will not cause any issues.
Okay I understand, thanks.

Agree with Fossey. Let it finish fermenting all the way then just bottle it. Non-carbonated cider and mead is called "still" and is a perfectly acceptable final product. If you're into that sort of thing. :)

Oh, and it's probably a lot cheaper to order potassium sorbate from a brewing supplier like midwest or northern than buy it at whole foods. Pretty sure not even the air at that store is cheap.
I figured that, but I want my family to try it for the holidays. She insisted on the Whole Foods brand haha

Ah yes, the "how to end the cider process" thingy. I was there a few years ago before I realized that beer is easier to make and tastes better. Just me.

If you ferment it completely, it will not explode and will be non-carbed, but it will be very unsweet, dry. If your thinking, nice appley mild sweet cider, this won't be what you get. You'll have more white wine like stuff

If you back sweeten with sugar to add sweetness but dont stop the yeast you'll get bottle bombs.

If you back sweeten and kill the yeast with heat you'll be sweet but not carbed (maybe what you want) Refridge won't stop the yeast, only slow it down.

If you want what I was after, slightly sweet and carbed. Let's see, advice to me was to backsweeten, allow to sit at room temp checking every two days until the carb amount is right (be careful). Then when it is where you want it, heat the bottles up in a hot water bath for (I forget how long) and chill. This was at best, an inconsistent process as some bottles worked out fine, others carbed away too much (a dangerous situation), some turned to vinegar.

I can say that what you want is probably easier to make. You just want to be sure and kill that yeast with heat or chemically if you are going to add more sugar after fermenting. I make cider with fresh apples from an orchard and juiced them in a juicing machine, long and messy. Then a second batch with cider from Walmart. BOth tasted about the same. Make sure store bought cider does not have preservatives in it or it will kill the yeast before they start.


Good luck. Last week I poured out my cider and used the bottles to make beer:) I need to change my forum name I think
Biased I can see ;) - after reading your post I think I am going to let them all finish fermenting so they/I can survive the trip home safely. I am then going to to backsweeten and pasteurize them by heating.

thanks everyone
 

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