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Aroma Hop Question

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Iordz

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I think that's an interesting question and I would like to know what others think, since I'm brewing an IPA in two weeks and I want to get the most out of my hops.
I have dry hopped and was happy with the results. You get a really floral, fresh hop aroma and flavor. If you use a good amount it tastes like you're drinking fresh hops. I think flame out hops might create a different result, with dry hops you throw them in the in the secondary, or keg, so some of the subtle get scrubbed, but with flame out additions you might lose a small amout of aroma.
 

covered95

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For IPA's usually both are suggested, but you will get the most aroma from dry hopping as their is no heat to cause the oils to isomerize.
 

CBBaron

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I'm actually curious about this also. So far I have always done both for my hoppy beers but I wonder if one or the other doesn't have and advantage.
If you want to do the experiment, report back on your findings. If you want to play it safe, split the hops and do both.
Craig
 

david_42

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I tried an experiment using fresh hops (about a pound) in a pale without any aroma add in the boil. I was disappointed. Won't try that one again.
 

brewhead

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BOTH! but do both and also try step hopping. take half of your dry hop schedule and put them in one week, and the second half the next week - you will notice a differance in the aroma.
 

Iordz

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So you guys are saying that if one wanted to make a good IPA, both aroma (flame-out) and dry hops should be employed?
 

malkore

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Iordz said:
So you guys are saying that if one wanted to make a good IPA, both aroma (flame-out) and dry hops should be employed?
I wouldn't say its mandatory, but it is a common practice/suggestion on the forums, especially for Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clones.
 

FlyGuy

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+1 to using both aroma and dry hops. But if I had to pick one over the other, aroma hops win hands down. Think of dry hopping as simply reinforcing your aroma hops. They make a great impression, but are pretty volatile and generally don't stand well on their own.
 
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RangerG

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That's what I've read here; that the dyr hops start to fade after as little as three months - so I've been doing both.

Used three ounces at 2 minutes in this last batch though instead of planning on a dry hop; guess I'll have to wait and see.

I just tried the Dude's SN Celebration recipe - i loved stuffing those three ounces of hops into the secondary - there's only a few inches of air left in there - soakin'

I love any excuse for adding more hops - like the advice on stepping the dry hops
 

chthonik

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+1 for both. I've noticed a big difference in aroma on the beers we've dry hopped vs. the ones we haven't (last hop addition is usually at 5m or 1m rather than flameout). Never done a back to back experiment though.
 

Bobby_M

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I agree that you don't want to boil off aromas but it's the heat that helps pull the aroma out of the hops in the first place. Flame out additions are my vote. Enough heat to help get the aroma out, but not enough boiling to drive them away. It's why a hop back works so well. Dry hopping is nice to add that last touch of freshness and it's why I like doing it IN the keg.
 

TexLaw

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I tell you folks, if you are brewing one of the hoppy "American" styles (e.g., APA or AIPA), you need to dry hop and not be shy about it. I've tried many, many, many homebrews in those styles, mostly in judging, and the beers that were not dry hopped or done so very lightly just did not make it. They might have been nicely balanced beers and quite drinkable, but you're just left wondering where the hops went. On the other hand, the well dry hopped ones easily stood out with that good hop "snap" that the others lacked.

For the very same reason, I don't know any commercial example of those styles that doesn't dry hop.


TL
 

the_bird

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The APA I recently brewed, which I like a lot, I intentionally did a 0-minute addition and no dryhopping. "Snap" is the perfect term for what it's lacking. I love the beer, it's got great balance, it's smooth and clear and gorgeous and toasty and has a real nice hop flavor - but it's missing that bit of an edge.
 
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RangerG

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I couln't do it. After I racked to secondary I dry hopped on top of the flameout hops anyway - I just love those hops.
 
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