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Applying Athletic Brewing's techniques to home brewing

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wadewegner

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Has anyone tried to apply what Athletic Brewing's techniques to home brewing? Any tips or advice? I'd really love to make a good tasting NA beer at home. Thanks!
 

DIYer

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Has anyone tried to apply what Athletic Brewing's techniques to home brewing? Any tips or advice? I'd really love to make a good tasting NA beer at home. Thanks!
I have no idea what Athletic's Brewing's techniques are, but did you notice the post stickied at the top of this thread (3rd post from the top)? The one about neutering beer--it's a post from someone here who developed a technique that seemed to work.
 

CascadesBrewer

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Do you know what Athletic Brewing's techniques are? Have you tried their brews?

I heard the Experimental Brewing podcast and was interesting. I stopped by my local Total Wine to pick up some of their brews. They did not have any but they had an interesting mix of craft NA beers so I got a mixed 6 pack. 2 of them were disgusting (nasty corn-like flavor), 2 were just like grain teas with little flavor, a porter was okay...the only decent one I thought was Wellbeing Coffee Cream Brew (likely because it has lactose, coffee and spices). That was the only can of the 6 that I finished.

I skimmed through that stickied thread. It seems to be mostly one guy saying he created an "NA" beer that only gives him a slight buzz. Most of the "science" discussion says that this process does not work that well and the only post I see about somebody getting a test showed a very minor reduction in alcohol. I don't trust that thread enough to follow the process described.

Personally, I don't have a need to get beers below the 0.5% ABV threshold. I would be fine with a 1% or 2% beer that tasted decent. I brewed a 3% Porter that was okay. I mashed at 162F and had a really high FG (1.030). The downside is that it has more calories and carbs than it would have if it fermented to 5% ABV...which defeats half the purpose for me. I brewed a 3% Dark Mild a few years ago that was very enjoyable.
 
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