Anyone Use Really Big water filters?

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virus692

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A friend of mine just gave me some stuff from work that they replased/ordered the wrongg flow rate on.

1)Wrong flow rate:
filter with the wrong flowrate. it is a 20"X 4.5" 1 mircron filter.I was given a full carton. five filters. I have no idea what to do with them.
Aquatrex LD01-20
2) a Large Water Filter case(stainless Steel)
44"X4.5" with high flow rate. I am still looking up more info.
 

JVD_X

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I used to use those to filter my wort before sending to the fermenter. Turned out that $3 was too much to spend on every 5 gallons of beer. Certainly it would be worth it for 10,15,,20 gallons.
 
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virus692

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Ok there seems to be a little confusion... here is a pic of the stainless steel filter next to a 16 oz Alum Bud bottle.... these things are HUGE.:rockin:

Click for larger pic.
 

Nerro

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Doesn't that jsut mean that you can use the filter multiple times?

Alternatively you could just pop it on craiglist and make some money of course.
 
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virus692

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I would but... the filters for it run $1500 a pop. I might be able to use a diffrent kind of filter.. but thats the qoute that the friend who orders them told me... EEEK... but they filter to .1 mircon ultra clean... AGF membrane.
 

rico567

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For a whole house filter, I just use the standard Omni unit, and have for several decades. The unit itself costs around $30, and the spun poly filters are two for $7 or thereabouts, and I change them out every 3-4 months. You can also get different filter cartridges for other purposes, such as carbon to remove chlorine, etc. I can't address the issue of filtering wort/beer, since I don't do it and have no plans in that direction......
 

Bobby_M

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I would find out how much the 1 micron version of those cartridges are and use that number to determine if the housing has a future in your home. I'd probably sell the whole darn thing on ebay and setup a sediment/carbon system in the standard 10" Omni housings in series. It will cost about $60 up front with two spare cartridges.

 

rico567

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+1 What "Bobby M" said...and nice pic! I forgot to mention that these filter units are not only inexpensive, but can easily be cascaded, as the pic shows.

If you need to get into more sophisticated treatment, such as resin removal of dissolved solids or RO (reverse osmosis), these folks Aquarium Water | Reverse Osmosis | RODI Water | ReefKeeper Water | Products and answers for your water treatment needs. who specialize in combination filter cartridge units for large aquarium setups, may be something to look at. For brewing, so far I just use the RO water from the grocery store. For $1.65 / 5 gal. it's the way to go for me- I get consistent water that makes great beer, and water is arguably the most important ingredient in beer.
 
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I know this is an old thread, but the topic is as current as ever.

If you want to minimize the cost of replacement filter cartridges, it's best to stick with "standard" filter sizes. You'll find these to be most widely available, and generally, the lowest cost. There are 4 standard sizes (all dimensions are nominal):
10" long x 2.5" in diameter
20" long x 2.5" in diameter
10" long x 4.5" in diameter
20" long x 4.5" in diameter

If you are using carbon cartridges to remove chlorine, make sure you pay attention to to maximum flow rates (in gallons per minute - gpm). It is good practice to limit flow to about 50% of the maximum flow rate. In nearly all situations, it makes more sense to use a carbon block rather than a GAC cartridge. If removal of "all" chlorine is critical, consider more than one carbon cartridge plumbed in series. If you need flow faster than a 20" x 4.5" carbon block, it's time to jump up to a carbon tank.

Russ
 

augiedoggy

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Why filter at all?
Depends on your water but it usually makes a HUGE difference in the taste..... My local city water is great for stouts and porters but leaves a less desirable taste in all my other lighter beers. I use a cheap RO system to filter all my brewing water (bought for my salt water tank) I then add a couple minerals back in and the amount varies by the style of beer I'm making. I keep it simple and use a chart for water styles. I have found this makes a HUGE difference in the taste of my beers.

I dont filter my wort since I recirculate and use a hop spider as well as wirlflock tablets.... now that I upgraded to a conical I have noticed the beer has improved even more since I often was too lazy to rack to a secondary with carboys (especially after reading all the advice that it wasnt needed) the ability to dump the trub and dead yeast has totally eliminated the metallic taste I would sometimes taste in my beers.

EDIT** Damit! just saw this is an ancient thread....
 
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Ok there seems to be a little confusion... here is a pic of the stainless steel filter next to a 16 oz Alum Bud bottle.... these things are HUGE.:rockin:

Click for larger pic.
That is a stainless steel RO Membrane housing for 4.0" x 40" RO membranes. Very common size. You should be able to sell those.

Russ
 
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