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Anyone try out the new Perlick 650SS Stainless Flow Control?

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thefost

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Interested if anyone has any feedback on the new Perlick 650SS Stainless flow control faucet. I might be upgrading my keezer with them and reducing my tube lengths.

So, has anyone used these yet?
 
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thefost

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Guess I'll volunteer to be the guinea pig then :)

unnamed.jpg
 

chemman14

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I'm interested in this as well. Especially if the resistance in it can be brought up enough to serve seltzer water and/or nitro stouts with normal length lines.
Why would you serve nitro stouts through a normal faucet?
 

TallDan

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Why would you serve nitro stouts through a normal faucet?
Unless I'm misunderstanding, the difference (other than appearance) between a nitro faucet and a regular one is the amount of resistance that it has in it. If this faucet can be dialed up to that level of resistance, I would not need a dedicated faucet for nitro beers. This faucet also appears to be about half the price of a SS nitro faucet.
 

chemman14

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Unless I'm misunderstanding, the difference (other than appearance) between a nitro faucet and a regular one is the amount of resistance that it has in it. If this faucet can be dialed up to that level of resistance, I would not need a dedicated faucet for nitro beers. This faucet also appears to be about half the price of a SS nitro faucet.
You're wrong (as far as I understand). The resistance is from a small plate inside the faucet. This not only provides resistance, but the many small holes the beer has to flow through knocks the CO2 out of solution. This is what causes the cascading effect and smooth mouth feel.
 
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thefost

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Unless I'm misunderstanding, the difference (other than appearance) between a nitro faucet and a regular one is the amount of resistance that it has in it. If this faucet can be dialed up to that level of resistance, I would not need a dedicated faucet for nitro beers. This faucet also appears to be about half the price of a SS nitro faucet.
Interesting theory. Last night as a test I happened to try a keg at 30psi and I was able to get a nice pour, but I didn't notice the creamy head or tiny bubbles you would get from a nitro tap.

And you are in luck, I also (finally) got my beer gas tank refilled yesterday, so I can do a side by side test with a nitro tap if you'd like.
 

chemman14

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Interesting theory. Last night as a test I happened to try a keg at 30psi and I was able to get a nice pour, but I didn't notice the creamy head or tiny bubbles you would get from a nitro tap.

And you are in luck, I also (finally) got my beer gas tank refilled yesterday, so I can do a side by side test with a nitro tap if you'd like.
I would be interested to see the results.
 

Cheesy_Goodness

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I'm curious about this too. Looking to start building a kegging setup in the next few months. If it pours like a nitro I'll have to pick one up.
 

TallDan

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You're wrong (as far as I understand). The resistance is from a small plate inside the faucet. This not only provides resistance, but the many small holes the beer has to flow through knocks the CO2 out of solution. This is what causes the cascading effect and smooth mouth feel.
OK, so there's more to that faucet than the resistance then. I'd still potentially be interested in serving seltzer water at high PSI with the higher resistance.

Interesting theory. Last night as a test I happened to try a keg at 30psi and I was able to get a nice pour, but I didn't notice the creamy head or tiny bubbles you would get from a nitro tap.

And you are in luck, I also (finally) got my beer gas tank refilled yesterday, so I can do a side by side test with a nitro tap if you'd like.
Cool! 30-35 psi is what I've targeted for carbonated water (for mixing with soda extracts or juice in the glass) but I've had problems serving it even with my longest beer line.

I'd love to see the side by side test with the beer gas and nitro tap compared to this. Sounds like it won't get the same results, but if i had all the pieces in one place I'd definitely do the test myself. :)
 
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thefost

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Ok, here are the results from my testing. Each test was conducted in a small sampler glass. Some beer pulled and discarded before every pour so that the lines were cold. Temperature of keezer was at 37 degrees F.


Perlick 525SS, 12ft 3/16 Tubing, 10psi


Perlick 650SS, 12ft 3/16 Tubing, 10psi, flow control slowed to half speed


Perlick 650SS, 3ft 3/16 "Silver" Tubing, 10psi, flow control slowed to half speed


Perlick 650SS, 12ft 3/16 Tubing, 10psi, flow control on full speed


Perlick 650SS, 3ft 3/16 "Silver" Tubing, 10psi, flow control on full speed


Perlick 650SS, 12ft 3/16 Tubing, 30psi Beer Gas (Nitro), flow control on med speed


Stout Tap, 12ft 3/16 Tubing, 30psi Beer Gas (Nitro)


Nitro Stout tap (Left) vs Nitro 650SS (Right)


I had a problem with my nitro tap while doing this test, I was getting pretty much all foam. I was getting a little bit of the cascade effect, but not as much as usual. I'm pretty sure the (subpar) test beer I was using was just carbonated a bit too high for the Nitro stout tap.

Either way I think it's clear that the nitro tap gives you a creamier head than the 650SS on beergas, although I did see a tiny bit of cascading with the 650SS sample. I will definitely be keeping my nitro tap, I think it gives better results.

I'm pretty pleased with my new 650SS taps though. I can get a good pour with only 3 feet of tubing, so that will tidy up my keezer immensely. I think the 525SS, when psi temperature and tube lengths are all perfect, produces a slightly better and longer persisting head than the 650SS. Also I think my 650SS taps were dripping slightly more than the 525SS. Overall though I think the pros of the flow control are definitely worth these minor issues.
 

day_trippr

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Does anyone think after seeing that series of pictures that there's a need for a "creamer" version? :drunk:

Cheers!
 
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thefost

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It looks like there is a "650SS" actually a "690SS" with a creamer function for ~$8 more
https://www.perlick.com/store/webcatalog2.php?catno=1&sectno=1&grpno=1

Edit: Looks like it might not be available yet.
http://www.perlick.com/bar-beverage...faucets/690ss-flow-control-push-back-creamer/
I originally was going to wait and buy that one. After reading reviews and thinking about it, I realized that it's going to confuse guests too much and they're going to spill all over the place.
 

benm1024

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I got 3 of the 650ss faucets for my new keezer and I love them! Makes it super easy to dial in the flow just right for different size glasses as well as growlers. I also really like that I can turn the valve all the way off to avoid accidental pours when I'm messing around with the keezer or other taps.
 

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I only have experience with the Perlick 575 creamer faucet and I PROMPTLY bought new innards to transform it into a 525. IMHO, it's a silly gimmick. If you want extra foam on your beer then just crack the handle instead of opening it wide. I actually think I get more from a cracked handle than the "creamer" faucet.

Problem is.... they already got my money :(
 

BBBF

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I only have experience with the Perlick 575 creamer faucet and I PROMPTLY bought new innards to transform it into a 525. IMHO, it's a silly gimmick. If you want extra foam on your beer then just crack the handle instead of opening it wide. I actually think I get more from a cracked handle than the "creamer" faucet.

Problem is.... they already got my money :(
The 575's work, but I agree it's mostly a gimmick. However, I don't enderstand shy you "PROMPTLY" got new parts. The 575's do the same thing as the 525's + the creamer function. Is there anything else you noticed that was different?
 

stpug

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The 575's work, but I agree it's mostly a gimmick. However, I don't enderstand shy you "PROMPTLY" got new parts. The 575's do the same thing as the 525's + the creamer function. Is there anything else you noticed that was different?
The amount of travel on the 575 is very short as compared to the 525, plus I didn't like having to ensure the through-ball passage was clean on every keg change. And, lastly, I wanted to make sure I got the conversion parts prior to them phasing them out.
 

JasonWB

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I just built my first keggerator after brewing for a few years and went with the 650ss. My dual tap setup is with one keg for home brew and one with a sankey that I've got commercial craft kegs on. I knew that I would be changing the craft and home brew types fairly often and wanted to be able to dial it in for each new beer easily. I don't have any experience with anything else, but I can say that I'm VERY pleased with the 650. Makes dialing in the right amount of head super easy. Also only $10 more per faucet than the non flow control version at my local beer shop. Definitely gets my recommendation.
 
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HI Guys, Great information about the 650 SS faucets. I'm about to start a keezer build with 10 taps. For those who have the 650's flow control faucets, What do you think is the minimum spacing that is needed between each faucet for comfortable operation? 3 1/2 inches... 4 1/2 inches..?

Thanks

Sixgun
 

JasonWB

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My handles are about 5" apart which leaves about 3.5" between the flow control and the side of the next faucet. I would say you could easily go down to 3" between handles and still have plenty of room to reach the flow control. As long as you have at least 1.5" between the flow lever and the next faucet I'd say you would be fine.
 
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thefost

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HI Guys, Great information about the 650 SS faucets. I'm about to start a keezer build with 10 taps. For those who have the 650's flow control faucets, What do you think is the minimum spacing that is needed between each faucet for comfortable operation? 3 1/2 inches... 4 1/2 inches..?

Thanks

Sixgun
Just checked and mine are 3" apart. Accessing flow control has not been an issue. The bigger issue is it doesn't leave a ton of room between my tap handles.
 

sogrady

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Just as a heads up to anyone considering the 650SS, I got two to replace the original Perlick 525SS units because our temperature was variable and I therefore wanted the foam control.

Unfortunately, however, the 650 is deeper than the 525 by maybe a 1/4" and will not seat in the shanks on our tower. I originally thought it was a valve issue, but even retracted fully the 650 just will not attach properly. It should be a pretty straightforward fix, but I'm not entirely clear on where to source deeper replacement shanks.

So for those looking to upgrade, be aware you may have a little more work to do.
 

bcrawfo2

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I replaced my 525s with 650s. What's weird is I have a few rows of threads showing, where I didn't before. Anyone else see this?
 

sogrady

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If I could get my 650's to thread, yes, this would be the case. The threading is maybe an eighth of an inch deeper than the 525's. Not sure why.
 

day_trippr

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I wonder if they lengthened the threaded section to provide enough room for the flow control compensator...

Cheers!
 

bcrawfo2

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I wonder if they lengthened the threaded section to provide enough room for the flow control compensator...

Cheers!
I thought about that...but I've been silently NOT loving my new faucets yet.
I get a shot of foam when I first start pouring and am starting to look at the problem. I started with "what things are not like the others"
I had an excellent pouring system with the 525s, I just wanted to overcome varying carb levels without adding line length. I also want to shorten the lines I have so I can clean up my keezer (haven't shortened yet).
 
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thefost

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Hey Guys,

Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it greatly!

Cheers

Sixgun
Got your PM, thought I'd post here.

Yes, they are 3" center to center, as you can see in the picture below. I have the handles fanned out slightly so they don't come into contact. Most of the handles are off right now because I'm doing an experiment.

20150114_212640.jpg
 

Kjuckett1025

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Anyone here running the 650's with ultra barrier silver liquid line? If so, what length are you using? Wondering if I could run shorter lines since they have the flow control.

Was going to do 12ft lines but wouldnt mind cutting that in half
 

bcrawfo2

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A late post. I just cut my beer lines to 4 foot (bevflex 200) and can serve seltzer at 30psi with no issue
 

Culinarytracker

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A late post. I just cut my beer lines to 4 foot (bevflex 200) and can serve seltzer at 30psi with no issue
Awesome. I just got 4 650ss's today. As soon as the varnish dries I will be installing them in my keezer.

How is the flow? If I keep my lines around 8-10 foot, will it work better serving beer with the control more open, or would it be the same with 4 feet, and the flow control shut down a bit??

Edit: I am also using bevflex 200
 

bcrawfo2

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Awesome. I just got 4 650ss's today. As soon as the varnish dries I will be installing them in my keezer.

How is the flow? If I keep my lines around 8-10 foot, will it work better serving beer with the control more open, or would it be the same with 4 feet, and the flow control shut down a bit??

Edit: I am also using bevflex 200

I got them 650s because was trying to clean up the inside of my keezer So far I am very happy with 4 ft and have plenty of adjustability
 

-CHRIS-

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Wondering if I could run shorter lines since they have the flow control.
f
You sure can, my lines are 3 feet now. Although I called Perlick and asked tech support and they said it wouldn't, the flow control certainly allows you to use short beer lines at high pressure. The only tradeoff is flow rate. I can fill 3 ounce sampler glasses of highly carbonated wheat beers no problem.

Chris
 

gnef

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I currently have three 650ss faucets, one on the walk in (out of 14 taps, the others are original ventmatics, 425ss, and 525ss faucets), and two for direct keg drawing for samples or even serving if I want.

I plan on switching out all my faucets eventually for the 650ss, I like them that much. I also plan on going to the bev seal ultra tubing afterwards as well, but I will be getting the 1/4 x 3/8 tubing since I have moved to 3/8'' john guest fittings for everything, and plan on putting the fittings on the shanks once I change out to all 650ss faucets so that I don't have to worry about the difference in pressure drop due to the line.
 
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