Anyone run nitrogen in their kegerator for any beer instead of Co2?

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TsunamiMike

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SO i currently am running a dual pressure taprite Co2 regulator with a Co2 tank. Looking to get a stout faucet and it seems i can use nitrogen to push all my beers as well as have the nitro for my stouts and nitro cold brew coffee.

Has anyone made the switch? What are the pros and cons?

I would still keep a single reg and co2 tank for force carbing but am wondering if it is a better idea to switch to nitro overall? Anyone know how many cornye itll push with nitro vs co2?
 

VikeMan

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SO i currently am running a dual pressure taprite Co2 regulator with a Co2 tank. Looking to get a stout faucet and it seems i can use nitrogen to push all my beers as well as have the nitro for my stouts and nitro cold brew coffee.
If you mean 100% nitrogen, I don't know of anyone who does that. Or do you mean a nitrogen/CO2 mix? That's a fairly common thing and there should be lots of threads around here about that.
 

day_trippr

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I think the response was based specifically on the use of straight Nitrogen.
And on that I'd have to agree - it isn't the best way to go.

fwiw, I run 70/30 beer gas through a Micromatic stout faucet at 35 psi using a 10 pound cga580-valved steel mixed gas cylinder. I get almost two years out of a fill, pouring ~5-6 ounces of my imperial chocolate stout nightly (and I mean every night :))

Cheers!
 

DuncB

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Nitrogen only would be hopeless unless you plan on opening a nitro coffee bar.


watch from about 6 minutes.

I think there is a gadget that mixes the nitrogen into the line during dispensing so the beer is CO2 carbonated and driven or pumped with Nitrogen maybe even the above gadget. It's not cheap though and you'd buy several regulators and a lot of beer gas for the money.

The real clue is in the term Carbonation. We do not Nitrogenate our beers, it doesn't dissolve and it changes the flavour without CO2 etc etc.

As @day_trippr says no pros to nitrogen only, beer gas mix for stout and some beers but not routine. I run about the same pressure for my stout tap and can't say how long it will last as only been using it a few months.
@day_trippr What pressure reading does your Nitro reg read ( not serving pressure mentioned )? Mine is a bit higher than for the CO2 setup.
 

DuncB

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I would think that Helium would be the fastest head loss ever. Hydrogen would be lighter but it's very reactive.
Argon is expensive and used for wine dispensing I have just learnt.
 
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TsunamiMike

TsunamiMike

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So I was told that an Intertap stout adapter with the restricted plate won’t work for serving nitro stout, I’ve been told I need a nitro faucet? Anyone have experience with this?

what’s the best way to achieve nitro?
 

DuncB

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@TsunamiMike I see you found the thread.
Tap and adapter will work provided you have the beer gas running, otherwise if you use it on a normally carbed stout no nitrogen mixed in you will get foam, foam and more foam.
 

day_trippr

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[...]
@day_trippr What pressure reading does your Nitro reg read ( not serving pressure mentioned )? Mine is a bit higher than for the CO2 setup.
Right now my beer gas tank is closing in on a refill, and the tank pressure is around 600 psi. That's actually lower than the average tank pressure of my three CO2 systems, which are all sitting around 800 psi. But that's a temperature thing, mostly, while the beer gas is a % fill thing. Eg: the last time I brought the beer gas tank home totally full it was registering around 1500 psi...

Cheers!
 

day_trippr

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I'm using a standard 10 pound mixed gas steel cylinder with a cga 580 valve - nothing exotic. They have to handle at least 2200 psi for that service class, iirc...

Cheers!
 

DuncB

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Hmm, maybe it's a feature of the pressure that he is getting from the cylinders that he fills my cylinder from. Would it make a difference CO2 first then Nitrogen or the other way round. I assume the Nitrogen filling cylinder is under much higher pressure than the CO2. So CO2 first then Nitrogen maybe. I think he went CO2 first 400grammes and then struggled to get 1.2 kg of Nitrogen in, he even tried freezing the cylinder.
I will have to enquire. My oxygen cylinder is under much more pressure that's for sure.
 

day_trippr

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Honestly, analog stuff like blended gas mixes aren't in my wheel house - I made my fortune manipulating ones and zeros :D
But every time I've had my beer gas cylinder filled it's been from an array of massive same-blend tanks - ie: no mixing required. The operator used the least filled of those tanks first, then moved to the next least filled, and so on, before finally topping off from the most-filled tank.

It's all about the pressure :)

Cheers!
 

day_trippr

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There isn't actually a "nitrogen tank" in the guiding regulations. There is a "mixed gas cylinder" that includes nitrogen and nitrogen/CO2 blends (aka "beer gas") as well as other gases (Argon, for instance) in the US national regulations.

"Normally", one obtains straight nitrogen - or blended beer gas - in a cylinder equipped with a CGA 580 valve, which would in turn drive the choice of regulator. In truth, it isn't completely out of bounds to fill a "CO2 cylinder" - with a CGA 320 valve - with beer gas, and use a "CO2 regulator".
Indeed, the actual regulator body can be identical for all three cases, with only the stem/coupler assembly differing from one usage to another...

Cheers!
 

DuncB

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I tried to change the stem on my spare regulator to use with the oxygen cylinder but it was on too tight for me to get it off. But the Nitrogen regulators ( also for oxygen and argon ) from Kegland are the same just a different Stem and coupler as Day_trippr says.

I suppose the cheapest way to get the headed stout effect is to use the ultrasonic jewellery cleaner method and a low carbed CO2 pour.
Plenty of videos of how to do this on the web. After all the Nitrogen adds nothing to the product you drink it just gets it there in style!
 

Vale71

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Disagree with that. A good nitrogen stout is awesome. That being said, it is too expensive for me.
The OP was talking about using nitrogen (either straight or beer gas, it's clear OP doesn't really know the difference) to serve regular beers at regular carbonation levels through a regular tap. This has no "pros" to speak of either than the "hey, everybody is talking about nitro so it must be really awesome" factor but it does have the cons I have detailed.

Clearly OP has fallen victim to the nitro-hype that makes some people think that everything must be better with nitro just because, well, it's nitro...
 

Garfield43

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If anyone is using beer gas (75% nitrogen/ 25% CO2) to dispense beer that isn't a stout, or anything else I would like to hear the particulars.
I bought a rig that was supposed to have "everything I would need" to dispense from kegs.
I got jockey boxes with normal taps and Miller Lite handles and 2 tanks with beer gas in them.
So it isn't the right set up for Guinness nor is it the right set up for beer.
Right now I am considering filling my tires with it.
Nitrogen doesn't leak through rubber as fast as air and is supposed to change pressure with temp less than air.
 

Vale71

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Nitrogen doesn't leak through rubber as fast as air and is supposed to change pressure with temp less than air.
Considering that air is 78% nitrogen I doubt you'll be able to see any measurable difference after replacing the remaining 22% with nitrogen.

Edit: strike that, with beer gas you'd be replacing oxygen with CO2 and possibly reducing the N2 content to as low as 70% (with a 70/30 mix).
 

bwible

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If anyone is using beer gas (75% nitrogen/ 25% CO2) to dispense beer that isn't a stout, or anything else I would like to hear the particulars.
I bought a rig that was supposed to have "everything I would need" to dispense from kegs.
I got jockey boxes with normal taps and Miller Lite handles and 2 tanks with beer gas in them.
So it isn't the right set up for Guinness nor is it the right set up for beer.
Right now I am considering filling my tires with it.
Nitrogen doesn't leak through rubber as fast as air and is supposed to change pressure with temp less than air.
I think you need an actual stout faucet. They have some kind of restrictor plate or device inside that is different from a regular tap. I used to have one, I almost never used it and I sold it with my converted beer fridge when I bought my kegerator. Didn’t have room for both boxes.

Far as beers other than stout, some beers that are not stout do come in nitro cans, like Boddington’s. People seem to have mixed feelings. Some say the nitro washes out the flavor, etc. But if you want to do that, I don’t see why it shouldn’t work.

 

Vale71

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Far as beers other than stout, some beers that are not stout do come in nitro cans, like Boddington’s. People seem to have mixed feelings.
That's probably because the "nitro packaging" makes absolutely no difference and any perceived difference is just the result of autosuggestion.
 

Nathan Graen

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My understanding is that you can use beer gas to dispense "normal beer". You would just need 4x the pressure and enough line to compensate. I've heard of bars doing this when there kegs are a significant distance from the tap.

So definitely a pro when you can't get adequate flow rate with line size without over carbonating the keg.

Also a pro would be only one cylinder for both stout and non-stout.

I haven't wrapped my mind around the jockey box. Long lines and beer at higher temp(in the keg) would both drive the need for higher pressure. I'm not sure how to compensate for the cooler lines in the box...

Personally, I have stout on tap on nitro and a separate cylinder just for it.
 

bwible

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That's probably because the "nitro packaging" makes absolutely no difference and any perceived difference is just the result of autosuggestion.
So you think there is “no difference” between a can of Boddingtons and a can of Coors Light?
 

Vale71

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So you think there is “no difference” between a can of Boddingtons and a can of Coors Light?
Is Boddingtons a nitro-packaged Coors Light? If not then your question is just meaningless and provocatory, i.e. a complete waste of time.
 

Jim R

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Clearly OP has fallen victim to the nitro-hype that makes some people think that everything must be better with nitro just because, well, it's nitro...

That is bs. The OP has simply been in bars and ordered nitrogen poured beers and has enjoyed the small bubble, creamy, foamy head that slowly develops in the glass. I had a friend that was a bartender at an Irish pub and the Guiness distributor made him take a course on the proper pour of a nitrogen poured Guiness. One of our local establishments has a Vanilla Stout on tap with their nitrogen tank and it has the same creamy head. I also enjoy Boddington on nitrogen tap just to watch the creamy head slowly develop in the glass over a couple minutes. You can't mimic this with a CO2 tank.
 

Vale71

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You do realize those are all beers that are designed to be served with nitro? Did you even bother to read the OP's initial posting?
 

rizziot

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I believe you do need a nitro / stout faucet to truly get the experience you are looking for. I am very interested in this and will be adding one to my setup by (hopefully) this fall. Please keep us posted as you move forward on this.

I found this article as well - Nitrogen Draft Tap - Brew Your Own which talks about the blended gas.

Send some pics when your setup!

@day_trippr - imperial choco stout on nitro sounds like an amazing nightcap!!
 
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TsunamiMike

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The whole reason for this post, is the stout that I am brewing. My wife wants it to be a nitro stout so that’s why my original post was inquiring about utilizing across across the whole gamut of my kegerator. Now I am curious as I think I’m going to a single bottle unit with a beergas max to run just for that stout. I’m hoping I canGet away with the inner tap stout attachment versus getting an actual nitro Faucet
 

DuncB

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Well my comments from the NITRO thread answer a few points raised above.

The cheapest way to get the headed stout effect is to use the ultrasonic jewellery cleaner method and a low carbed CO2 pour.
Plenty of videos of how to do this on the web. After all the Nitrogen adds nothing to the product you drink it just gets it there in style!

Guinness did make these gadgets ( surgers ) for a while but they are a rarity and expensive now. Aliexpress has them quite cheap, apparently a big tall head on the beer is something the Japanese really like. I prefer beer in my glass. But they do have these surger units and they are reasonably priced, if you don't want to get a jewellery cleaner!
It's like those Side taps that some people are raving about. It's just a Stout adapter on tap that is controlled with a ball valve rather than the on off that the normal beer taps have. I fail to see why 3 different types of head on my Czech lager makes it better ( Svetle, Polotmavy, or Tmavy).
But horses for courses.

I don't like the non Nitro beers on Nitro they just aren't right, flat, etc etc. But the Nitro stout is a pleasure that I'm not even guilty about.IMG_20210329_210248.jpg
 

50calshooter

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SO i currently am running a dual pressure taprite Co2 regulator with a Co2 tank. Looking to get a stout faucet and it seems i can use nitrogen to push all my beers as well as have the nitro for my stouts and nitro cold brew coffee.

Has anyone made the switch? What are the pros and cons?

I would still keep a single reg and co2 tank for force carbing but am wondering if it is a better idea to switch to nitro overall? Anyone know how many cornye itll push with nitro vs co2?

You want "beer blend" (75/25) gas not 100% nitrogen. I use to work a food gas delivery route. Ive nitrogenated every beer I drink at one point just to see what it was like. Waist of time. For me and my taste in beer nitrogenated beers are over rated.
 

50calshooter

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My understanding is that you can use beer gas to dispense "normal beer". You would just need 4x the pressure and enough line to compensate. I've heard of bars doing this when there kegs are a significant distance from the tap.

So definitely a pro when you can't get adequate flow rate with line size without over carbonating the keg.

Also a pro would be only one cylinder for both stout and non-stout.

I haven't wrapped my mind around the jockey box. Long lines and beer at higher temp(in the keg) would both drive the need for higher pressure. I'm not sure how to compensate for the cooler lines in the box...

Personally, I have stout on tap on nitro and a separate cylinder just for it.
When beer travels over 100 feet or so you use 75/25 to keep it from over carbonating
 

Beholder

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I’ve got carb and nitro taps. Enjoy the side by side of same brew served differently as well a nitro cold brew coffee made to my caffeine preference. Beer gas fills are more expensive (and doesn’t stretch as far since it is gas and not liquid like a CO2 tank), so I keep both. If you had majority nitro taps, then sure, you could compensate the odd carbonated beer with extra line, but the cost delta and having only 2 nitro taps of 8 in service means two cylinders for me.
 

Mutant

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Curious if I make a keg filled with liquid Margaritas (no crushed ice and filter limeade pulp) if using nitrogen would be a better option than CO2 to push it out of the keg. I don't think a bit of CO2 carbonation would be bad but nitrogen would solve that. My other concern is that the solid would settle and the alcohol would rise. Any thoughts or solutions?
 

DuncB

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Put the margarita in a wine bag and gravity feed it or put the bag in a keg and connect tubes up so that CO2 going in pushes on the outside of the bag and then the liquid gets forced out thru the tubing keg post and normal delivery. Nitrogen and beer gas are more expensive than CO2.
 

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I just think that the fact that nitro is abbreviated the same as nitroglycerin, nitrous oxide, etc... it just has a cool factor.
When we talk about CO2 we have to enunciate the chemical formula or name--"carbon dioxide". Just doesn't roll off the tongue the same way.
The one time I had argon in beer, I said well, that was nice...don't need to pay for that again.
I do love a good nitro stout, or coldbrew...would love to get a separate system for that one day! I have an intertap stout spout...was planning to just use that with my CO2 on low pressure when I make my next stout.
 
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