Anyone has experience with Alpha amylase from Fermfast? Brut IPA help

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JMBrewer

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Hi,

I'm planning to brew a Brut IPA in the near future. I just got some Alpha amylase from Fermfast, it was really cheap at my LHBS. I was looking at recipes and most of them add the enzyme during mash or at fermentation. This one says to add 1/3 in the mash and 2/3 after the boil has cooled down a little bit. The enzyme seems to be pretty heat stable and optimum temp is 185F. It will be my first Brut IPA so I'm wondering if anyone has experience using this enzyme. Also, I'm doing a 2.5 gallon batch. Should I reduce the amount of enzyme or it doesn't matter?
Thanks!
 

toddk63

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I’ve used FermFast for two brut beers. For both,I added to the fermenter. From my brew notes, I added 1/2 tsp for a 5 gallon batch. Both beers finished completely dry.
NTexBrewer, was that the Alpha or Gluco FermFast you added to the fermenter?
 

DuncB

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I hedged my bets and put 1/2 in the mash and then 1/2 in the fermenter. Fermented to 1.000

Make sure your mash is at correct temp to get the sugars right.
 

cmac62

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I have used it in the mash and fermenter. If you mash low the base grain should have enough of the Amylo to make a very fermentable wort, but want to make sure it gets down super low you want to use the Glocoamylase. :mug:
 

cmac62

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Mark, I think the 1/2 tsp sounds about right for the dosing, but I'm not sure how much it will drop the FG. Are you putting it in the mash or fermenter? If you put it in the fermenter you can leave it to take it as low as you want to go. Some pitch it after the krausen has fallen and some (like me) pitch in with the yeast. I figure its going in may as well put it in while it's open and then don't have to open it again. :mug:
 

Mark3885

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I have not used any glucoamylase as of yet, I want a little more dryness in my beers , but not 1.000 dry . I would be putting it in when I pitch the yeast for the same reason you stated. Only place I can find it is online , my LHBS is not local anymore since we moved an hr south of civilization. I love this social distancing.
 

cmac62

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Maybe a longer mash in the 150-155 range may get you there without risking the 1.000 or below. I've had a couple of bruts go below.
 

Mark3885

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I usually mash at 153-154 but after 60 minutes I would be down to about 148-149. So staying closer to the 153 mark would give the. Glucoamylase something more to work on and thus burn itself out ?
 

cmac62

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I usually mash at 153-154 but after 60 minutes I would be down to about 148-149. So staying closer to the 153 mark would give the. Glucoamylase something more to work on and thus burn itself out ?
I was thinking no gluco, just a longer mash with the beta and alpha close to the 153 zone where both are fairly active. The betas break down the dextrines and the alpha takes it the rest of the way. :mug:
 

DuncB

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My last couple of ales have fermented down to 1.006 with Wyeast 1098, mashed at 62 celsius for half an hour then raised to 68 for half an hour.

Another option is to rely on the diastase action of the dry hops to produce some more fermentable sugars and that way you sort of get a secondary ferment.

Not sure that I'd risk the enzyme to dry out the beer a bit as it's only turnable off with heat, and you wouldn't want to pasteurise your beer once the OG was correct.
 

MaxStout

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Just bought some BSG-brand amylase from Midwest, as I plan to use it in the mash of an upcoming Witbier. The mash bill is 50% adjunct, and the base malt is Castle Belgian pilsner, which is only 76 Lintner. That works out to about 38L overall, which is marginal without some extra enzyme.

I'll try to remember to post here with results later.
 
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