ANVIL FOUNDRY ALL-GRAIN BREWING SYSTEM

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Anyone have the boil off rate for using a steam slayer

3.55 goes to 3.00 in 1 hour on a 6.5 with 240V at 70%

I think you'll have to experiment. Small power level changes make a difference, even just the starting volume makes a difference. Fill yours up with water at an approximately normal level, get it up to a boil, and then run an hour and see what you get. It's a good chance to shake down the system too and be sure it's not leaking, is draining OK, and so on.
 

Mekchu

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I don't recirculate when heating strike water which for me is the mash and sparge at once. I don't typically do full volume, so I like to not have water in my hoses when taking out my sparge and making sure the strike mash water volume is accurate. But this is odd to me. When heating my water, the anvil temperature (probe is at the bottom of kettle) is always within one degree of my thermapen at the top. Are you saying the top is hotter than your bottom when just heating strike and nothing else is in the water? If thats the case, Id say one of those two measurements is in error i.e. out of calibration. When I am chilling to pitching temps with my IC, I DO occasionally get a higher reading from the low anvil probe compared to the top which is due to the trub/hops insulating the low anvil probe. I let my hops roam free so I do see this every now and then but not all the time. I guess its just dependent on how everything settles.




I agree completely in general. While recirculating during the mash, the top of the mash is always pretty close +/- 2 degrees to the bottom anvil probe unless Im in the middle of stepping up the temp. Then there's a little lag of course. But during chilling, you may encounter a higher than normal temp reading down low due to hops/trub insulating the probe. In those instances its happened to me, rather than moving around the IC to equalize it (which makes the hop/trub resuspend in the wort - not something I aim for), I just trust the top thermapen reading to know Im at pitching temps. This discrepancy can happen even if you are using a whirlpool arm and recirculating the wort around the IC. I use the spin cycle from brewhardware.com and love it. Again, I let my hops roam free so there's more in my kettle to insulate the temp probe.

Cheers!
Yeah, I could have just misread my new thermometer, since 71C is roughly 160F. lol

The system did surge at one point during the mash. Set temp was 155F and actual read about the same, but then actual reading started to climb rapidly to about 165F with an alarm beeping away like it was Chernobyl or something. I'm thinking, yeah you're freaking out but it's all you, I have no control over this. It corrected itself pretty quickly and seemed to work fine after that.

I think one aspect of electric brewing that I will have to get use to is not having the simplicity and immediate control of a gas flame. For me the electronic controller is literally and figuratively a black box.
 
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3.55 goes to 3.00 in 1 hour on a 6.5 with 240V at 70%

I think you'll have to experiment. Small power level changes make a difference, even just the starting volume makes a difference. Fill yours up with water at an approximately normal level, get it up to a boil, and then run an hour and see what you get. It's a good chance to shake down the system too and be sure it's not leaking, is draining OK, and so on.
looks like 70% is the sweet spot for the boil with the lid on, thank you for that, I did a test and to keep any steam out of the house I had to start my water at 200, what's your process
 

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what's your process

I'm not sure I know what you're asking...

After I'm done mashing and I'm starting to drain the grain, sparge, and etc. I bump the power to 100% to start heating the wort while I'm monkeying around. About the time I'm all wrapped up and I've checked my gravity, added some Fermcap, hop spider and boil hops, assembled the tri-clamps, hooked up the water and drain lines, and so on - I'm almost at a boil. After that I drop down to 70% power, close the lid, and start working on all the stuff I need to find, sanitize and assemble. I might check every couple minutes to see if it's boiling for sure (decent surface movement rippling around) and when it is I start my 60 minute timer.

BTW in my 6.5 on 240V I'm starting around 3.5 - 4 gallons of water. I've seen that even just a 5% power change, or even starting as far down as like 3 gallons of water, both can have a big effect on what boils off. Well, an effect like +/- 1/4 gallon anyhow, which is a lot on a 6.5. I got my initial reads just using plain water and went from there.
 
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a water test reduce about the same as you in an hour for me and that's important to change my recipe, I'm really concerned about steam of any kind getting in the house, I left the lid on to 200 but steam is already flowing through the steam slayer at that point so I started the water, I know its probably impossible to keep it all out but it looks like that worked, the bad news is I used about 9 gallons of water by starting at 200, thanks for the help
 

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It does chew up some water. I have a few spray nozzles and ended up on one that sounds similar, rated for like 9-ish GPH. I could probably get away with lower but like to not have it draining out scorching hot like it was at 6-ish. And TBH while I attempt many green things in my life, here in MN water is fairly plentiful. I'm sure I'd think differently in AZ or CA.

I try to keep the steam down as well, the house can handle it but the less my wife thinks the house "smells like a brewery" the more acceptable she is to me brewing in the house. Here (again noting MN) if I want to brew in January (or really November through March) it's the only realistic option.
 

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Was looking at the still options on Anvil's website the other day. Not sure why...doubt I have the patience to do something and wait a couple of years to determine if it is any good or not.

and I keep looking at the BrewEasy Compact. The footprint is really attractive..and the idea that you could disconnect everything and just throw it into the damn dishwasher is alluring too.
 

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I'm lucky in that my wife will pretty much support everything that I want to do. I've had the distillation discussion before and the response was something along the lines of...."Just goto the store and buy whatever it is that you want honey. Brewing beer is enough...you don't need to start making your own liquor."

More talking/typing out loud...doesn't keep me from looking tho.
 

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The whole distilling, aging bit. I know it isn't required, but...probably recommended.

Ahh, got it! Read what you wrote again and now I see "still options". Misread that the first time I guess. Yes - it'd indeed take years.

Some folks wonder why I brew beer, when I could just buy it. Even though I love brewing and know why I do it... I wonder why people make their own bourbon, when they could just buy it. LOL.
 

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So, I've been struggling to figure out mash temperature control for the last several brews. I bought a Thermapen One because I was questioning weather to believe the Foundry displayed temp or that of a cheap $15 temp probe stuck into the mash bed before and after stirring the mash. This cheap probe always measured 7 degrees less than the Foundry. Yesterday, before mashing in, The Foundry and Thermapen each measured the strike water temp exactly the same. Last time I posted this issue here, someone suggested raising and lowering the malt pipe a couple times during the mash, so I did that at the 20 minute and 40 minute mark. My desired mash temp was 153 and the Foundry read 153, but the Thermapen read a consistent 147 mash temp both before and sifter stirring. The only thing I noticed raising and lowering the malt pipe (and thus mixing in the outside water) did was cause the heating elements to turn on. When I saw how this was going to go, at the 30 minute mark, I raised the Foundry temp to 159 degrees, and at the 40 minute mark, the Thermapen measured the mash temp a consistent 153 for the rest of the mash. Please note: My grist weight was 12 lbs, I used the small ring adaptor, I use 240 volts, I recirculate, and I stir the top third of the mash bed every 10 minutes for the first 40 minutes. I ended this brew at 80% efficiency, which I was very pleased with. .
 

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Glad it worked but yeah that's a huge difference. You said you recirculate, too. Strange... I measure about 2 degrees difference (reads higher than actual). Wish I had an answer - sounds like your process is good.
 

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I picked up a Engbird Bluetooth Thermometer for my mash. I keep an eye on mash temp on my phone.
 

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I've had the distillation discussion before and the response was something along the lines of...."Just goto the store and buy whatever it is that you want honey. Brewing beer is enough...you don't need to start making your own liquor."
True enough if you’re talking about buying rum or vodka. Have you priced Scotch or bourbon lately?
 

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I'm lucky in that my wife will pretty much support everything that I want to do. I've had the distillation discussion before and the response was something along the lines of...."Just goto the store and buy whatever it is that you want honey. Brewing beer is enough...you don't need to start making your own liquor."

More talking/typing out loud...doesn't keep me from looking tho.

Next time she is out ask her nicely to pick up a bottle of Islay Scotch. Nothing crazy like a $399 bottle of Islay Violets 33yo but your average Lagavulin 16 year. She might come back and say 'can't you make this cheaper?'.
 

bwible

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Next time she is out ask her nicely to pick up a bottle of Islay Scotch. Nothing crazy like a $399 bottle of Islay Violets 33yo but your average Lagavulin 16 year. She might come back and say 'can't you make this cheaper?'.
Even some of the decent Total Wine Spirits Direct scotches are north of $40

[edit] $40 for a fifth is $200 a gallon. Just saying
 

franknbeans

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So, I've been struggling to figure out mash temperature control for the last several brews. I bought a Thermapen One because I was questioning weather to believe the Foundry displayed temp or that of a cheap $15 temp probe stuck into the mash bed before and after stirring the mash. This cheap probe always measured 7 degrees less than the Foundry. Yesterday, before mashing in, The Foundry and Thermapen each measured the strike water temp exactly the same. Last time I posted this issue here, someone suggested raising and lowering the malt pipe a couple times during the mash, so I did that at the 20 minute and 40 minute mark. My desired mash temp was 153 and the Foundry read 153, but the Thermapen read a consistent 147 mash temp both before and sifter stirring. The only thing I noticed raising and lowering the malt pipe (and thus mixing in the outside water) did was cause the heating elements to turn on. When I saw how this was going to go, at the 30 minute mark, I raised the Foundry temp to 159 degrees, and at the 40 minute mark, the Thermapen measured the mash temp a consistent 153 for the rest of the mash. Please note: My grist weight was 12 lbs, I used the small ring adapter, I use 240 volts, I recirculate, and I stir the top third of the mash bed every 10 minutes for the first 40 minutes. I ended this brew at 80% efficiency, which I was very pleased with. .

Are you using a bag in the basket? I haven't even bothered to use the basket on its own after the guy I got it from used said not to (brew bag). I noticed a little stratification too if you aren't getting it all mixed up well and dipping the basket. Seems like everyone does it different, but I use a huge whisk that reaches down to the bottom of the basket and stir it all up every 15-20 mins. Set the little pump on a decent trickle and keep up with the mixing and dunking. I probed the temp in the middle and bottom of the basket and it has always been within 2 degrees of the Foundry reading. My efficiencies are in the high 70s and mid 80s. It gets better if you ramp the temps as well.
 

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Are you using a bag in the basket? I haven't even bothered to use the basket on its own after the guy I got it from used said not to (brew bag). I noticed a little stratification too if you aren't getting it all mixed up well and dipping the basket. Seems like everyone does it different, but I use a huge whisk that reaches down to the bottom of the basket and stir it all up every 15-20 mins. Set the little pump on a decent trickle and keep up with the mixing and dunking. I probed the temp in the middle and bottom of the basket and it has always been within 2 degrees of the Foundry reading. My efficiencies are in the high 70s and mid 80s. It gets better if you ramp the temps as well.
Yes, I'm using the basket, but will try the bag. Would you please post or pm me the exact bag and (I assume clips) that work well with the Foundry. I guess it needs to be positioned several inches above heating element? I have no issue with efficiency now as I'm always in the 75-80% range when using the small batch adaptor.
 

franknbeans

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Yes, I'm using the basket, but will try the bag. Would you please post or pm me the exact bag and (I assume clips) that work well with the Foundry. I guess it needs to be positioned several inches above heating element? I have no issue with efficiency now as I'm always in the 75-80% range when using the small batch adaptor.
I have the Brew Bag that is sized to fit the basket. I know they sell one that's a hair bigger to use without the basket as well. And clips, I have 4 utility spring clamps from Home Depot.
 

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It seems Anvil has removed the side holes on their 10.5 version, as it says the small batch adaptor is only compatible with order versions. I imagine to improve efficiency. When did this happen?

 

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It seems Anvil has removed the side holes on their 10.5 version, as it says the small batch adaptor is only compatible with order versions. I imagine to improve efficiency. When did this happen?

Maybe what they should have said is that the small batch adapter in no longer needed, since the new style basket basically has the small batch adapter built-in (i.e. no holes in the sides near the bottom.)

Brew on :mug:
 

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It seems Anvil has removed the side holes on their 10.5 version, as it says the small batch adaptor is only compatible with order versions. I imagine to improve efficiency. When did this happen?


It was probably just a few weeks ago they unveiled the new malt pipe. It has a false bottom like the one that comes with the Blichmann G2 kettles.
 

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I'm using the Wilser bag and have been happy with it. Multiple options out there.

I have one of each. I'd say that the Wilser isn't quite as beefy as the Brew Bag version sold on Anvil's site, but it's less expensive as well. I think if you use a bag in the pipe - get the Wilser. If you use it outside or think you'll really put the bag through some abuse, maybe get the Brew Bag version.
 

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Yep, just first of the year. I got old one last fall with holes..... But I just covered them with aluminum sheet that I had. Will see how well it works
 

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I have been using my Anvil for the last year. 11 batches thus far. So far, I love the ease of operation and being able to brew in all kinds of weather as I have now moved to brewing in the basement.

My only true issue with it is that it is consistently inconsistent when it comes to brewhouse efficiency. I've been as low as 58% and as high as 72%. I can take either one, but it is annoying not knowing what I am going to get other then in the end, it will make beer.

My method on the last 2 brews were as follows (both recipes designed at 65% BH efficiency.:

Batch 1 - 13.75 lbs of grain, Distilled water with salt adjustments per Brewfather calculator, bag in malt pipe, mashed at 155 (recirculating) for 45 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, dunking the malt pipe before stirring. Raise temp to 170, hold for 10 minute mashout, sparge with 2 gallons of 170 degree water. OG: 1.063 post boil BH efficiency 72%

Batch 1 - 15 lbs of grain, Distilled water with salt adjustments per Brewfather calculator, bag in malt pipe, mashed at 153 (recirculating) for 45 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, dunking the malt pipe before stirring. Raise temp to 170, hold for 10 minute mashout, sparge with 2 gallons of 170 degree water. OG: 1.054 post boil BH efficiency 58%

Most recipes I have made usually fall between 60% and 65% BH Eff. The last 2 batches I have started the 2 gallon sparge (from the recommendation from someone on the FB group.), normally i used the default 1 gallon sparge per the manual.

These are my latest experiences.

Anyone have any comments or suggestions?
 

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Different crush sizes?

Different recipes i.e. one pale and one stout and drastically different pH's (did you do any acid or lime)?

Overall volume of water different?

How did you measure your wort volume - maybe misread a mark? Compensate for temperature?

How do you measure gravity, if it's refractometer do you give it a little time to let the solids fall out, if it's hydrometer did it cool off close to room temp or just below?
 

JoeSpartaNJ

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See answers below



Different recipes i.e. one pale and one stout and drastically different pH's (did you do any acid or lime)?

Both IPA's. No Lime. Only Gypsum, Calcium Chloride, Epsom Salt

Overall volume of water different?

Not really - only a .10 of a difference.

How did you measure your wort volume - maybe misread a mark? Compensate for temperature?

Used Anvil internal markings (which in mine are surprisingly accurate,) and my measured fermentor

How do you measure gravity, if it's refractometer do you give it a little time to let the solids fall out, if it's hydrometer did it cool off close to room temp or just below?

Hydrometer. Same one for brews. Calculated for adjusted temperature.
 

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Well... you're doing it right, it sounds like. More grain with similar water will be less efficient, but not as different as you are seeing so that's not it - well it's not the only thing by a mile anyhow.

I found my marks are accurate at mash temps, and are off at room temp and just off boiling, but I know how to compensate so it works (about 1/8 gallon at either end for a 5 gallon batch (1/16 for me w/ the 6.5 making 2.5 gallon batches)).

How about the grain crush? Did you DIY or did a store do it. Did you DIY there or mail order? Crush also plays a big difference. I got my own mill and things really stabilized for me in that regard.
 

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Well... you're doing it right, it sounds like. More grain with similar water will be less efficient, but not as different as you are seeing so that's not it - well it's not the only thing by a mile anyhow.

I found my marks are accurate at mash temps, and are off at room temp and just off boiling, but I know how to compensate so it works (about 1/8 gallon at either end for a 5 gallon batch (1/16 for me w/ the 6.5 making 2.5 gallon batches)).

How about the grain crush? Did you DIY or did a store do it. Did you DIY there or mail order? Crush also plays a big difference. I got my own mill and things really stabilized for me in that regard.

Kits bought from More Beer.

My crush. .028.
 

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The mystery gets more mysterious.

Recipes? Maybe one had a lot of 2-row that contribute to fermentability, one had a lot of oats or something that don't add as much?

That 15 pounder would normally be expected to give you above 1.054. The 13.75 for 1.063 sounds a lot more normal, as does 72% or even higher for all the things you are doing correctly. If I had to choose a brew that didn't work right for some reason I'd say it was the 2nd one. If that helps at all for where to look.
 

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The mystery gets more mysterious.

Recipes? Maybe one had a lot of 2-row that contribute to fermentability, one had a lot of oats or something that don't add as much?

That 15 pounder would normally be expected to give you above 1.054. The 13.75 for 1.063 sounds a lot more normal, as does 72% or even higher for all the things you are doing correctly. If I had to choose a brew that didn't work right for some reason I'd say it was the 2nd one. If that helps at all for where to look.

Grain Bill - Recipe 1

Malts (13 lb 12 oz)
13 lb (94.6%) — Briess Pale Ale Malt 2-Row — Grain — 4 SRM
8 oz (3.6%) — Briess Carapils — Grain — 1.3 SRM
4 oz (1.8%) — Caramel/Crystal Malt — Grain — 30 SRM

Grain Bill - Recipe 2

Malts (15 lb)
12 lb (80%) — Briess Brewers Malt 2-Row — Grain — 1.8 SRM
2 lb (13.3%) — Viking Malt Vienna — Grain — 4.3 SRM
8 oz (3.3%) — Caramel/Crystal Malt — Grain — 10 SRM
8 oz (3.3%) — Weyermann Carapils/Carafoam — Grain — 2 SRM
 
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