ANVIL FOUNDRY ALL-GRAIN BREWING SYSTEM

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videojunkie1208

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GF grains are *MUCH* more expensive than regular brewing grains. usually by a factor of 5 or 6, sometimes as much as 10x. Hops aren't as big as a delta, but you have to be careful where you order them from, and make sure that they didn't get cross contaminated in the supply chain. Even buying in 'bulk', 5 lb bags (not 50, 5) are upwards of $20 ea. depending on the grain. 5 gallon kits are usually around $75 (+) and then you have to buy special enzymes and additions.
 

IslandLizard

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GF grains are *MUCH* more expensive than regular brewing grains. usually by a factor of 5 or 6, sometimes as much as 10x.
GF? GrainFather? No: Gluten Free! ;)
I forgot you had mentioned before you're brewing gluten free:
nearly all the decent Gluten free beer recipes [...]
Yes, gluten free malts are more expensive as the demand and production of them are much smaller. Shop around to find the best pricing.

Have you looked on our Gluten Free Forum for inspiration and resources?

You also could malt your own.
 

Jsmith2154

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There is a bit of a safety factor in the maximum grain volume that the 6.5 gal Anvil will hold, but 10 lbs is probably very much at the maximum end. Rather than running your process at the maximum or above the design limits, you might be better served with the 10.5 gallon Anvil. This would also give you enough leeway to change your brewing process in the future should you ever want to do so.

As to maximizing your efficiency, Denny Conn and others have demonstrated that you can maximize extraction efficiency from a batch sparge process by producing approximately equal runnings from the mash and sparge steps. Just some food for thought.
Preamble: you see to be a big proponent of the foundry so that is why is I am tagging you.
After some mishaps I’ve been brewing 3ish gl mid gravity beers BIAB on propane for the last few months. Last summer we had solar panels installed and I’ve been considering an electric rig since. After initially dismissing these all-in-one systems I’ve really come around on them. To the point I want to move to the foundry. I’ve read this entire thread a bit of some others and watched a couple of YouTube videos. But I still have some unanswered questions before I pull the trigger.

1) After boil complete and transfer to fermenter how do you clean the foundry? Leave it in place or transport to a sink and dump and rinse there?
2)What are people’s actual batch size measurements? I say I do 3glish batches but I have primarily 2.75gl kegs but put right at 3gl in a fermenter and leave a little behind in the kettle to try and leave break material behind as much as possible.
3)Do people whirlpool at flameout at all? Can the included pump handle this?
4)Possible after purchase upgrades? I use camLocks and I see other people have with this. But, I’ve been thinking what about different pump, or hop spiders, maybe a jaded brewing chiller.

TL:DR
I’m really tempted but interested in some of the less glamorous things we don’t tend to consider before having something delivered.
 

Noob_Brewer

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Preamble: you see to be a big proponent of the foundry so that is why is I am tagging you.
After some mishaps I’ve been brewing 3ish gl mid gravity beers BIAB on propane for the last few months. Last summer we had solar panels installed and I’ve been considering an electric rig since. After initially dismissing these all-in-one systems I’ve really come around on them. To the point I want to move to the foundry. I’ve read this entire thread a bit of some others and watched a couple of YouTube videos. But I still have some unanswered questions before I pull the trigger.

1) After boil complete and transfer to fermenter how do you clean the foundry? Leave it in place or transport to a sink and dump and rinse there?
2)What are people’s actual batch size measurements? I say I do 3glish batches but I have primarily 2.75gl kegs but put right at 3gl in a fermenter and leave a little behind in the kettle to try and leave break material behind as much as possible.
3)Do people whirlpool at flameout at all? Can the included pump handle this?
4)Possible after purchase upgrades? I use camLocks and I see other people have with this. But, I’ve been thinking what about different pump, or hop spiders, maybe a jaded brewing chiller.

TL:DR
I’m really tempted but interested in some of the less glamorous things we don’t tend to consider before having something delivered.
Just to give you context, Im a brand new brewer and brew in my garage on 240V with the 10.5g foundry. Ive now brewed 11 batches, all NEIPAs except for one pale ale so Ive been putting around 6ish oz of hops into the kettle (boil or "whirlpool").

With this context in mind: 1) after I get 5.75gallons into the fermenter I end up with 0.75g total left over - about 0.68g in the kettle due to all the hop material (I let them roam free with no hop bags etc! - and another little bit for my "into fermenter" hydrometer reading. So after my boil and "whirlpool" Im left with about 6.5g in the kettle.

As for cleaning, it is a breeze for me. After putting wort into fermenter, I immediately measure all my losses (dump hose liquid into kettle first) and then just dump the losses in the grass in my side yard. I then quickly hose the inside of the foundry with my outside hose and all that is left is a little debris stuck to the bottom (not much) and a small ring of hop/debris around where my boil level was. I then add about 8gallons of water in the kettle, hook up the pump and hoses, add the malt pipe back in, add some PBW and start heating to 150 degrees with recirculation. This whole process takes about 5minutes after I measure my losses. While this is heating I then clean up everything else and once that is done, I return to the foundry. Everything heated with HOT PBW takes care of the foundry and pump. I simply rub around the inside of foundry with a simple non abrasive sponge after dumping the solution and the bottom of foundry is already squeaky clean but I give it a quick wipe down anyways. I rinse everything out well and then dry immediately with micro fiber towels. Also, I open the pump after this and EVERY time it has been perfectly clean like new even with all the hop material etc. Quick rinse of the pump, spray with star san and good to go. In summary - cleaning is VERY easy for me.

As for your other questions - since I was starting from scratch, I did buy the recirc system separate from the foundry (but got the recirc at 20% off black friday sale!). That little pump does the job very easily with zero issues. I thought about changing the fittings to QDs or cam-locks - but honestly there is no need to. The white clamps and hoses come off easy and have had zero issues with them. So if you want a different pump and nicer fittings - go for it! My opinion is that they aren't a necessity and Id rather spend my money elsewhere. I haven't second guessed the anvil recirc package for the foundry for one second. It just works and the pump is very quiet and great.

As for the chiller - I did splurge myself and I got a CUSS brewing "all in one" immersion chiller - its basically the same exact design of the hydra. This immersion chiller rocks! With 50-60degree tap water, I can chill 6.5g down to pitching temps in less than 5 minutes. The size of the chiller is such that I just move it up and down in the foundry and it chills QUICK!. I am VERY happy with this "extra" purchase. In the summer I imagine that I will use the foundry's original chiller as a "pre-chiller" if necessary when my ground water is warmer.

Lastly, As I mentioned earlier - I haven't felt the need to buy a hop spider but I imagine it would help lower my losses - but I am of the opinion that I want the hops to be free! lol. I actually don't truly whirlpool with the pump but rather I simply do a hop steep and don't even stir. Again, IMHO, i think that the temperature of water with hops free in kettle is a bigger factor at hop extraction rather than movement (whirl pooling).

So while I didn't have any previous system to compare this against, these are my experiences thus far with this system. Hope this helps and no I didn't get any $$ from anvil for this favorable review although Id gladly accept it if they offered! :)

EDIT: the other “after purchase” was a wilser bag custom fit to the kettle, not the malt pipe which gives me flexibility to use it in both. Out of all the brews I’ve done I’ve NOt used the bag twice- once it worked just fine and the second time I got more grain material in the kettle than I cared to due to one simple little “slop” when I stirred the mash pipe. So the bag definitely cuts down on the debris making it to the kettle and am very happy continuing using that bag
 
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Jsmith2154

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Just to give you context, Im a brand new brewer and brew in my garage on 240V with the 10.5g foundry. Ive now brewed 11 batches, all NEIPAs except for one pale ale so Ive been putting around 6ish oz of hops into the kettle (boil or "whirlpool").

With this context in mind: 1) after I get 5.75gallons into the fermenter I end up with 0.75g total left over - about 0.68g in the kettle due to all the hop material (I let them roam free with no hop bags etc! - and another little bit for my "into fermenter" hydrometer reading. So after my boil and "whirlpool" Im left with about 6.5g in the kettle.

As for cleaning, it is a breeze for me. After putting wort into fermenter, I immediately measure all my losses (dump hose liquid into kettle first) and then just dump the losses in the grass in my side yard. I then quickly hose the inside of the foundry with my outside hose and all that is left is a little debris stuck to the bottom (not much) and a small ring of hop/debris around where my boil level was. I then add about 8gallons of water in the kettle, hook up the pump and hoses, add the malt pipe back in, add some PBW and start heating to 150 degrees with recirculation. This whole process takes about 5minutes after I measure my losses. While this is heating I then clean up everything else and once that is done, I return to the foundry. Everything heated with HOT PBW takes care of the foundry and pump. I simply rub around the inside of foundry with a simple non abrasive sponge after dumping the solution and the bottom of foundry is already squeaky clean but I give it a quick wipe down anyways. I rinse everything out well and then dry immediately with micro fiber towels. Also, I open the pump after this and EVERY time it has been perfectly clean like new even with all the hop material etc. Quick rinse of the pump, spray with star san and good to go. In summary - cleaning is VERY easy for me.

As for your other questions - since I was starting from scratch, I did buy the recirc system separate from the foundry (but got the recirc at 20% off black friday sale!). That little pump does the job very easily with zero issues. I thought about changing the fittings to QDs or cam-locks - but honestly there is no need to. The white clamps and hoses come off easy and have had zero issues with them. So if you want a different pump and nicer fittings - go for it! My opinion is that they aren't a necessity and Id rather spend my money elsewhere. I haven't second guessed the anvil recirc package for the foundry for one second. It just works and the pump is very quiet and great.

As for the chiller - I did splurge myself and I got a CUSS brewing "all in one" immersion chiller - its basically the same exact design of the hydra. This immersion chiller rocks! With 50-60degree tap water, I can chill 6.5g down to pitching temps in less than 5 minutes. The size of the chiller is such that I just move it up and down in the foundry and it chills QUICK!. I am VERY happy with this "extra" purchase. In the summer I imagine that I will use the foundry's original chiller as a "pre-chiller" if necessary when my ground water is warmer.

Lastly, As I mentioned earlier - I haven't felt the need to buy a hop spider but I imagine it would help lower my losses - but I am of the opinion that I want the hops to be free! lol. I actually don't truly whirlpool with the pump but rather I simply do a hop steep and don't even stir. Again, IMHO, i think that the temperature of water with hops free in kettle is a bigger factor at hop extraction rather than movement (whirl pooling).

So while I didn't have any previous system to compare this against, these are my experiences thus far with this system. Hope this helps and no I didn't get any $$ from anvil for this favorable review although Id gladly accept it if they offered! :)

EDIT: the other “after purchase” was a wilser bag custom fit to the kettle, not the malt pipe which gives me flexibility to use it in both. Out of all the brews I’ve done I’ve NOt used the bag twice- once it worked just fine and the second time I got more grain material in the kettle than I cared to due to one simple little “slop” when I stirred the mash pipe. So the bag definitely cuts down on the debris making it to the kettle and am very happy continuing using that bag
Thanks for the detailed run down!
I will be in my garage with it and was hoping to put it in the back corner close to my sink so moving it to the sink isn’t a huge deal for cleaning I was more just curious if there is a method of cleaning it without moving at all.
As I am planning smaller sized batches minimizing loses is big unless the smaller foundry can end with enough wort to make up for the trub.
My current rig has camlocks and figured I could swap most of them over.
I agree on temp helping hop stands/whirlpool more than the movement. I currently use a pump to help speed chilling and had the same idea as you on using the included chiller as a prechiller.
Thanks again for the great write up.
 

Oginme

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Preamble: you see to be a big proponent of the foundry so that is why is I am tagging you.
After some mishaps I’ve been brewing 3ish gl mid gravity beers BIAB on propane for the last few months. Last summer we had solar panels installed and I’ve been considering an electric rig since. After initially dismissing these all-in-one systems I’ve really come around on them. To the point I want to move to the foundry. I’ve read this entire thread a bit of some others and watched a couple of YouTube videos. But I still have some unanswered questions before I pull the trigger.

1) After boil complete and transfer to fermenter how do you clean the foundry? Leave it in place or transport to a sink and dump and rinse there?
2)What are people’s actual batch size measurements? I say I do 3glish batches but I have primarily 2.75gl kegs but put right at 3gl in a fermenter and leave a little behind in the kettle to try and leave break material behind as much as possible.
3)Do people whirlpool at flameout at all? Can the included pump handle this?
4)Possible after purchase upgrades? I use camLocks and I see other people have with this. But, I’ve been thinking what about different pump, or hop spiders, maybe a jaded brewing chiller.

TL:DR
I’m really tempted but interested in some of the less glamorous things we don’t tend to consider before having something delivered.
My preference for the Anvil is really based upon the 6.5 gal unit which best fits my typical batch size of 10 liters into the fermenter, 11 liters end of boil volume. I looked at many of the others and decided that I did not want to be running my process at the bottom end of the system's capability. From there, I have started to push the limits up and down in capacity and consistency, but that is the process engineer in me trying to fully define the capabilities.

To answer your questions:

1. I collect the first few gallons of chilling water (which is then hot) as I start cooling the wort. After pumping out as much wort as I can into the fermenter, I add a little bit of water and drain the trub and remaining wort into a bucket to toss. I then use the heated water, adding about a gallon to the unit and recirculating it around the system. I use a small stiff plastic brush to scrub down the walls and bottom of the vessel before pumping it out into a container to pour down my laundry room sink. I will repeat this again before pouring in a gallon of PBW solution which I keep on hand. I will recirculate this for a few minutes before pumping back into the bucket it came from. I then rinse with the remainder of the heated water. I drain the rest of the water out and allow it to air dry. The whole process takes around 15 to 20 minutes.

2. As stated above, 10 liters (2.6 gal) into the fermenter, 11 liters (2.8 gal) end of boil. I've gone up to 15.9 liters into the fermenter on the first attempt to find the high limit of capacity and am pretty sure that I can do a 18 liter batch successfully. On the low side, I have gone down to a 5 liter batch, but it is much less efficient due to trub loss.

3. I do a whirlpool/hop steep at the end of the boil. I add a bit of tubing to the recirculating pipe to bring the level of discharge down below the surface and clamp the pipe to the side to create a consistent flow clockwise. It is not a vigorous whirlpool, but it does a good job creating floow.

4. You can search the Anvil Foundry users group on facebook which has a number of people who have done aftermarket additions to their units. I have started to use a hop spider to avoid the hop debris from getting into the recirculating pump.
 

Jsmith2154

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My preference for the Anvil is really based upon the 6.5 gal unit which best fits my typical batch size of 10 liters into the fermenter, 11 liters end of boil volume. I looked at many of the others and decided that I did not want to be running my process at the bottom end of the system's capability. From there, I have started to push the limits up and down in capacity and consistency, but that is the process engineer in me trying to fully define the capabilities.

To answer your questions:

1. I collect the first few gallons of chilling water (which is then hot) as I start cooling the wort. After pumping out as much wort as I can into the fermenter, I add a little bit of water and drain the trub and remaining wort into a bucket to toss. I then use the heated water, adding about a gallon to the unit and recirculating it around the system. I use a small stiff plastic brush to scrub down the walls and bottom of the vessel before pumping it out into a container to pour down my laundry room sink. I will repeat this again before pouring in a gallon of PBW solution which I keep on hand. I will recirculate this for a few minutes before pumping back into the bucket it came from. I then rinse with the remainder of the heated water. I drain the rest of the water out and allow it to air dry. The whole process takes around 15 to 20 minutes.

2. As stated above, 10 liters (2.6 gal) into the fermenter, 11 liters (2.8 gal) end of boil. I've gone up to 15.9 liters into the fermenter on the first attempt to find the high limit of capacity and am pretty sure that I can do a 18 liter batch successfully. On the low side, I have gone down to a 5 liter batch, but it is much less efficient due to trub loss.

3. I do a whirlpool/hop steep at the end of the boil. I add a bit of tubing to the recirculating pipe to bring the level of discharge down below the surface and clamp the pipe to the side to create a consistent flow clockwise. It is not a vigorous whirlpool, but it does a good job creating floow.

4. You can search the Anvil Foundry users group on facebook which has a number of people who have done aftermarket additions to their units. I have started to use a hop spider to avoid the hop debris from getting into the recirculating pump.
Awesome! I get the feeling you are using this size unit in a way that lines up with my goals. So you leave the unit in place to clean, correct? You’re not lifting and carrying to a sink. This is great. Also, you’re using the anvil pump the entire time correct? Not one pump for mash and another for the whirlpool/chilling. Good idea on the tubing when do you put the tubing on? Right at flameout or prior to let the wort sanitise it? I’m not on FB so this forum is where I’m doing my research.
 

Oginme

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Awesome! I get the feeling you are using this size unit in a way that lines up with my goals. So you leave the unit in place to clean, correct? You’re not lifting and carrying to a sink. This is great. Also, you’re using the anvil pump the entire time correct? Not one pump for mash and another for the whirlpool/chilling. Good idea on the tubing when do you put the tubing on? Right at flameout or prior to let the wort sanitise it? I’m not on FB so this forum is where I’m doing my research.
Yes, I leave the unit in place. When I brew inside, I am right next to my laundry room sink, so extending the line over is not too hard, but it is much easier just to pump it into a spare bucket.

I am using the Anvil pump. It is OK and gets the job done.

I use a short piece of high temp silicone tubing on the end of the SS bend pipe that comes with the unit. Once the lid comes off, I can slip it over the pipe and clamp the SS bend in place against the side of the unit using a big binder clip. I didn't really need to hose to recirculate, but did not want a lot of air entrapment while the wort was still hot. I start recirculating once the line is in place, about 3 to 4 minutes post flame out.

I have the tubing soaking in my pail of sanitizer I always keep on hand, but I still prefer to run the hot wort through it. As long as the wort temperature is above 165F for at least 15 seconds, everything is good to go.
 

Jsmith2154

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Yes, I leave the unit in place. When I brew inside, I am right next to my laundry room sink, so extending the line over is not too hard, but it is much easier just to pump it into a spare bucket.

I am using the Anvil pump. It is OK and gets the job done.

I use a short piece of high temp silicone tubing on the end of the SS bend pipe that comes with the unit. Once the lid comes off, I can slip it over the pipe and clamp the SS bend in place against the side of the unit using a big binder clip. I didn't really need to hose to recirculate, but did not want a lot of air entrapment while the wort was still hot. I start recirculating once the line is in place, about 3 to 4 minutes post flame out.

I have the tubing soaking in my pail of sanitizer I always keep on hand, but I still prefer to run the hot wort through it. As long as the wort temperature is above 165F for at least 15 seconds, everything is good to go.
Great stuff! Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. Like I said I initially dismissed these all-in-ones but looking at them more this really seems to give me what I’ve been searching for at an EXTREMELY reasonable price point.
 

Jsmith2154

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Yes, I leave the unit in place. When I brew inside, I am right next to my laundry room sink, so extending the line over is not too hard, but it is much easier just to pump it into a spare bucket.

I am using the Anvil pump. It is OK and gets the job done.

I use a short piece of high temp silicone tubing on the end of the SS bend pipe that comes with the unit. Once the lid comes off, I can slip it over the pipe and clamp the SS bend in place against the side of the unit using a big binder clip. I didn't really need to hose to recirculate, but did not want a lot of air entrapment while the wort was still hot. I start recirculating once the line is in place, about 3 to 4 minutes post flame out.

I have the tubing soaking in my pail of sanitizer I always keep on hand, but I still prefer to run the hot wort through it. As long as the wort temperature is above 165F for at least 15 seconds, everything is good to go.
I’ve seen this mentioned in passing but how are you handling your volume measurement? Are the markings on the foundry sufficiently accurate? Or are you measuring in a separate vessel then pouring over before your dough in?
 

Noob_Brewer

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I’ve seen this mentioned in passing but how are you handling your volume measurement? Are the markings on the foundry sufficiently accurate? Or are you measuring in a separate vessel then pouring over before your dough in?
I measured out markings on a stick - quart by quart. What Ive found is that one mark may be good, but the other is a little off. for example at my 8.5gallon tick mark: when I put in 8.5gallons quart by quart, the liquid level is almost to the top of the 8.5g number - so you can't actually read it! lol Annoying. Also, i wanted better accuracy in measuring volumes than eyeballing what the volume is when it is in between a half gallon/gallon tick. Software (I use beersmith) predicts you should have 7.63gallons (for example) of preboil volume. You cannot eyeball that. So having a separate calibrated device is VERY important to me whose still learning how to brew. I get all my volume measurements very well imo so when a gravity reading is off, I can better problem solve. If both volume and gravity are off, Ive found that its an educated guess at best as to where the errors were.
 

Jsmith2154

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Yes, that all makes sense and I have been brewing long enough to know repeatable volume measurements are critical. Other than a making a stick any good way to mark the interior of the kettle? Or is the stick idea my best option?
 

Noob_Brewer

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Yes, that all makes sense and I have been brewing long enough to know repeatable volume measurements are critical. Other than a making a stick any good way to mark the interior of the kettle? Or is the stick idea my best option?
if you are using the malt-pipe the way its intended and having it sit on the SS ring on top of the foundry, you won't be able to read the interior markings unless you lift the malt-pipe. A stick on the other hand, can slip in there easily and I use the liquid level mark on the stick to tell me the level of the liquid without having to raise the malt-pipe. Ive been sparging so knowing the level of liquid at this point is important to me. Been working for me.
 

limitedbwr

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You could put a piece of tubing on the spigot, lift the tubing above the liquid level inside the anvil(or clamp it to the top of the anvil somehow), and open the spigot. That will show you how high the liquid level is inside. If you had some marking on the outside to indicate your pre-boil volume then you could just compare it. This is basically a poor-mans sight-glass.
 

Oginme

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I’ve seen this mentioned in passing but how are you handling your volume measurement? Are the markings on the foundry sufficiently accurate? Or are you measuring in a separate vessel then pouring over before your dough in?
Here is how I make a measuring stick for volume: http://www.beersmith.com/forum/index.php/topic,20873.0.html

I have not trusted pre-etched or stamped markings on kettles. While they are usually in the ballpark of where the actual volume is, too many times I have worked with people on their equipment profiles who were led astray by bad markings. I have two pots which are marked (and the Anvil), and have only found one of them where the markings were close enough to my measurements.
 

Keano41

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I ordered my 10.5 from Great Fermentations as well (I didn't realize BH sold those, too). I ordered back in February and they were back ordered until mid-April. I did follow up with them and they should be receiving their shipment from Anvil next week to send out orders.
 

Jsmith2154

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So I am ready to pull the trigger on this one but being as the price point is a good bit under what I was budgeting I want to take a chance to really spec this out to maximize its potential. I use camlocks so adding a few more is a no brainer. I’ve scouted out a jaded immersion chiller, may use the steel one as a prechiller when the summer hits.
Main suggestions I’m looking for are I am wanting a more vigorous whirlpool to aid chilling time, will the riptide pump be good or overkill? And secondly any screening upgrades for the diptube? As I’m going with the 6.5gl system clean wort is a big goal which I’m hoping will aid in my yeast harvesting.
 

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I am using the 10.5 and am going back to bagging my hops. While the spigot is a great tool, I find at the end of the boil there is too much junk to get clear transfers. This probably pertains more to the 10.5, but even with rotating it seems the smaller diameter of the kettle makes the trub pile pretty deep (with loose pellet hops). So I am going to try some batches with bagged hops to minimize the "stuff".

This is a great unit and most obstacles can be worked around.
 

Jsmith2154

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What dimension works best for the hop spider? Is there a go to vendor on them? I’ve also seen one or two people mention the trub trapper.
 

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Okay, Ive read the entire thread. Very interested in some further research. Recently I purchased a used three vessel (more beer tippy dump) system. I am finding it is difficult to make a 5 gal batch because the amount of water under the FB in the MT is already almost 5 gals. It takes more that 5 gals to cover any of the temp probes (HLT, MT or BK). When I bought the tippy I didnt even look into the all in one units. After realizing I'm likely down grading to something easier I read through this thread. As I write this I'm asking myself do I want to continue brewing 5 gal batches or down grade that also and make some three gal batches. Of course in the 10.5 gal version I could easily brew six gal batches and spit them for different yeast. Thanks for all of the imput. I'm going to have to check out the FB page. :mug:
 

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I currently have NG burner on Boilermaker kettle and cooler-mash tun. I have an itch to buy this system to simplify equipment and cleaning but even 2400W seems low power compared to gas. I also have a riptide pump and looks like I would need to make/buy recirculation arm and screen to make use of it.

Any comments from someone went on the path from gas to electric.

Thanks

(I just noticed they moved the controls to the top. Anyone know if there are any other updates?)
 

rac3850

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I currently have NG burner on Boilermaker kettle and cooler-mash tun. I have an itch to buy this system to simplify equipment and cleaning but even 2400W seems low power compared to gas. I also have a riptide pump and looks like I would need to make/buy recirculation arm and screen to make use of it.

Any comments from someone went on the path from gas to electric.

Thanks

(I just noticed they moved the controls to the top. Anyone know if there are any other updates?)
I have my Foundry 10.5 running on 240v. I've done five 5 gallon batches on it. I switched from an 8 gal GasOne kettle and a high output (10 psi?) propane burner. The Foundry on 240v really isn't much slower, if at all. I haven't timed it, but I was shocked how fast it went from tap temperature to boil. If I ran it at 110v then I am sure it would be considerably slower than the burner.

But the big advantage is the ability to set a target temperature and hold it there +/- 1 degree. In addition you can easily control the boil intensity with the power control. I run the boil at 82% power and it keeps a good rolling boil - boil off at 100% power was a bit much (I believe 60% power simulates the boil you would get at 100% power on 110v). Temp control with the burner (I have) is a real challenge/impossible.

I gave my GasOne kettle and cooler mash tun to my son. I now have the Foundry 10.5 and a small kettle and induction burner for heating water for the Foundry's 1 gallon sparge.

My unit has the low mounted control panel. It is certainly usable, but the high mounted angled panel looks like a dream. I emailed Anvil to see if there is a retro kit to move the panel, but alas no such luck. I'd rig something up myself but not while the warranty is in effect.

The recirc screen is simple, it is 10.25" in diameter. Since you already have a pump, making an arm and the screen would not be difficult. Although Anvil's accessory and parts prices are downright reasonable for an OEM.

I also went for Anvil's 7.5 gallon fermenter - a huge upgrade for me vs. my plastic buckets. It works great.
 

harrower

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I currently have NG burner on Boilermaker kettle and cooler-mash tun. I have an itch to buy this system to simplify equipment and cleaning but even 2400W seems low power compared to gas. I also have a riptide pump and looks like I would need to make/buy recirculation arm and screen to make use of it.

Any comments from someone went on the path from gas to electric.

Thanks

(I just noticed they moved the controls to the top. Anyone know if there are any other updates?)
I switched from Propane when I saw Anvil offered a 240V system. Other systems only offered 120V and much more expensive than the Anvil. I liked the fact that I could preset a start time. I'm ready to mash in when I wake up in the morning or when I get home from work. I also used a cooler mash which would require a transfer to my boil kettle. I also like recirculation during mash. Also holds temp within 1 degree. Also, I don't have to continually check temps. I still use my old burner and kettle for my sparge. Mine has the controls on the bottom of the kettle. New models have moved to the top. Nice improvement. I also use a Harbor Freight 18" X 12" furniture mover. $10. Large casters and easy to move my Anvil around when brewing.
 

mbg

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@rac3850 Thank you for the very thorough response.

My Boilermaker is 15 gal. because sometimes I make double batches with my son. My son is new to brewing and recently purchased the 10.5 gal. Foundry and is trying to get me to buy one.

I have a BrewVision to alarm me when water temp. is close (or too low) but can see advantages of close control of temp. and ability to recirculate during mash with this electric system.

I keep flip flopping over the purchase of the Foundry plus which one to get. As I said I have a RipTide pump which I currently use for xfer mash-in water, xfer sparge water, whirlpool during chilling , xfer wort to fermenter. Even though I have a pump I'm almost thinking might be worth it to get it with the pump kit because my pump may be too large for what I would use it on for the Foundry.
 

rac3850

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I also use a Harbor Freight 18" X 12" furniture mover. $10. Large casters and easy to move my Anvil around when brewing.
I did the same, easy to move it even when it's full. I mounted a raised platform on the dolly to get a bit more off the floor for control panel access. And I learned the hard way you may need access to the reset button on the bottom. I have since drilled a decent sized hole in the platform that gives me access to the reset (but I haven't needed it since that one time).
 

Bassman2003

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Get a hop spider for dumping your hops or other additions into during the boil.

View attachment 675946
I am going back and forth with this the trub/transfer approach. I brewed with some bagged hops yesterday and noticed they had an impact on the boil (120v). I think with the relatively small diameter of the kettle, bags are not ideal. What does everybody think about the hop spider impact vs a bag in terms of the boil intensity? I would think it would be similar?
 

Jsmith2154

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@Bobby_M had the clamp spin cycle in stock, so I just ordered that and couple other camlocks fittings. My current plan is to re-fit my existing chugger pump to run in place of the small anvil pump. I need to settle on a hop spider and determine if I need to unmount my pump from the toolbox I built. If I do that I will need to reinstall a standard 120v three prong plug. No reason that would be an issue, is there?
 
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