Another Keezer Build

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Made my goal. I pulled a pint today. I got a lot more work on the top today. I'll take pics tomorrow.
 
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Here's where it's at now. Obviously I still have more work ahead of me, but I couldn't wait to get a rough idea of what it would look like.

Still have to mount the paneling to the frame, connect the lid to the freezer, connect the coffin to the lid. And I still have plenty of sanding, puttying and staining. Oh yea and I also have to decide on a top surface. Oh and build a skirt. OHH and some decorative molding. Not necessarily in that order but yea those are things I've got to do.

Oh also anyone out there that has a holiday freezer can you check and see if both hinges have springs? I'm not sure if I lost one or if it didn't come with one.
 
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Has anyone who has build a coffin style keezer ran into problems using the factory hinges? My lid weighs a ton and the thought of using the factory hinges is stressing me out . I've been thinking of buying a piano hinge. But i'm worried about puncturing a cooling line. Any other simple but elegant solutions to beef up the hinges?
 

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Has anyone who has build a coffin style keezer ran into problems using the factory hinges? My lid weighs a ton and the thought of using the factory hinges is stressing me out . I've been thinking of buying a piano hinge. But i'm worried about puncturing a cooling line. Any other simple but elegant solutions to beef up the hinges?
My lid weighs a ton too, and I havnt even laid the tile yet! I did discover from another keezer picture that the hinges may come apart. It looks like just a compression spring inside. I'm going to try to take mine apart tomorrow night and see.
 
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I've taken mine apart and have got them to attach to the new lid. The problem I forsee is the hinges not tearing out of the freezer due to the extra weight. I'm not concerned about the spring propping the lid open, to me that's a lost cause. I don't mind using a spare 2X4 to prop it.

Anyone add extra hinges and have a part number?
 

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Has anyone who has build a coffin style keezer ran into problems using the factory hinges? My lid weighs a ton and the thought of using the factory hinges is stressing me out . I've been thinking of buying a piano hinge. But i'm worried about puncturing a cooling line. Any other simple but elegant solutions to beef up the hinges?
I suspect that the factory hinges may be your best bet, unless you can find something sturdier that will match up with the same holes (that have some mass behind them for the screws to bite into). Aside from puncturing coolant lines, most of the freezer's surface is only very thin metal, in which screws will have a difficult time finding secure purchase.

My keezer design is double hinged with a very heavy collar. I Used the factory hinges to afix the collar to the freezer, and they work great. I used door hinges to hinge the freezer lid to the collar. While they work, it's not so great. The screws are only tenuously held into the thin metal of the lid, and will probably loosen over time.



Piano hinges may work, due to the shear number of screws. Somebody else here may have a great solution that neither you or I have thought of.
 

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Maybe a wooden butress (or two) that extends out a couple of inches from the back of the keezer, that the lid can rest on when the lid is fully open, taking much of the stress off of the hinges... Dunno, just started thinking about this one.
 
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Maybe a wooden butress (or two) that extends out a couple of inches from the back of the keezer, that the lid can rest on when the lid is fully open, taking much of the stress off of the hinges... Dunno, just started thinking about this one.
that gives me an idea of making a hinged butress. It will extend away from the keezer when the lid is opened and help support it. I'll see if i can't make something out of stuff laying around the house.

here's a little sketch I made.

 
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Thanks for the link. They've got tons of stuff, but unfortunately they don't sell anything made by Holiday.
 

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that gives me an idea of making a hinged butress. It will extend away from the keezer when the lid is opened and help support it. I'll see if i can't make something out of stuff laying around the house.

here's a little sketch I made.

I think you may be on to something here... Very simple, cheap, and should be easy to execute. Nice!
 
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Wanted to post a quick update on my progress. I had set out to get the majority finished over Xmas break and I have! All that's left is tiling and a kick board. All four taps were flowing until I kicked a keg but I've already got a refill brewing. Check it out and let me know what you think.







Happy Holidays, CHEERS!
 
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What color stain is that? It looks incredible!

Can't wait to see it tiled!
It's Minwax #255 Red Mahogany on Oak. I used the Minwax pre-conditioner, let the stain penetrate for 15 minutes and applied 3 coats of satin polyurethane (sanding lightly between coats). It was quite a laborious process but the results were worth it.
 
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Now that I'm looking into tiling, can anyone else comment on how they've attached their tiles to the top. I'm thinking liquid nails... not sure if there is something better?
 

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Now that I'm looking into tiling, can anyone else comment on how they've attached their tiles to the top. I'm thinking liquid nails... not sure if there is something better?
seeing as i'll be tiling my keezer tonight allow me to chime in.

I had originally planned on just Liquid nailing my tiles to the wood, but after drooping my tile off to the "Pro" to have him polish my edges he said that Liquid nails was basically jerry rigging it and that my granite would be falling off and breaking in 6 months.

I have since purchased some 1/4" FibeRock Aqua board from Home Depot, some thin set and I am going to actually lay tile like it's supposed to be done.

but since you have a wood frame all the way around already and no worry about tiles falling off the side of the lid I'd just DGAF and use Liquid Nails.

-=Jason=-
 
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It sure is. I got it for christmas. I saw them online at one point, there is some guy that takes unique beer bottles and converts then into drinking glasses. I'll dig up the link when I get a chance later.
 
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seeing as i'll be tiling my keezer tonight allow me to chime in.

I had originally planned on just Liquid nailing my tiles to the wood, but after drooping my tile off to the "Pro" to have him polish my edges he said that Liquid nails was basically jerry rigging it and that my granite would be falling off and breaking in 6 months.

I have since purchased some 1/4" FibeRock Aqua board from Home Depot, some thin set and I am going to actually lay tile like it's supposed to be done.

but since you have a wood frame all the way around already and no worry about tiles falling off the side of the lid I'd just DGAF and use Liquid Nails.

-=Jason=-
Can you elaborate on the pro polishing your edges. I've never cut tiles and would appreciate any hints or warnings. Im looking to do slatetoo
 

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Can you elaborate on the pro polishing your edges. I've never cut tiles and would appreciate any hints or warnings. Im looking to do slatetoo
well I was going to have "exposed" edges and well they aren't polished. I called around to several Tile contractors in my area and the going rate was about $10 a square foot to polish. he ended up doing mine for $60 cash and even cut my side pieces for me.

check out my keezer build in my sig I'll take better photos tonight after I grout of the polished edges.

-=jason=-
 
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I’ve been holding off on tiling the top because weight has become an issue to me. I’m afraid that the hinges are going to fail at it’s current weight and don’t even want to think about it how heavy the lid will be after tiling. In order to mitigate this issue I’ve been thinking about adding a damper and attach it to the underside of the lid and the frame.

Has anyone attempted something like this before? Any reputable websites from which to buy dampers? How would I go about installing a damper? Also is there a practical way I can determine the stroke length I’ll need, instead of just guessing?

Finally, will a damper keep weight off of the hinges? Or will it just aid in opening/closing?
 
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Well it has been a long time since I updated this thread. Right when I finished up the keezer I moved. It has taken a while to get settled in, but now everything's fitting into place.

Everyone, let me know what you think.


 

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this is my next project, glad you posted the pics, yours look great, this will guide me with some great ideas.
 

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I don't mean to ask a stupid question, but I have 0 carpentry experience and I'm going to try to make a keezer much like this one in the next few weeks. Just bought my freezer today!

The question I wanted to ask is, earlier when you showed the 'exploded view' of the frame and the other piece...did you put both of those against the Keezer? Why wouldn't you just use the outside frame?

Awesome Keezer! I'm going to try to put my own spin on it if I can figure this out!
 
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I don't mean to ask a stupid question, but I have 0 carpentry experience and I'm going to try to make a keezer much like this one in the next few weeks. Just bought my freezer today!

The question I wanted to ask is, earlier when you showed the 'exploded view' of the frame and the other piece...did you put both of those against the Keezer? Why wouldn't you just use the outside frame?

Awesome Keezer! I'm going to try to put my own spin on it if I can figure this out!
I'm not sure I fully understand your question, but here goes:

The reason I built a frame that surrounded the freezer, rather than attach the plywood covering directly to the freezer has to do with how freezers work. Freezers exchange heat through their 'skin'. If you directly apply anything to the outside wall of the freezer you're going to make it less efficient. Thus driving up the cost to cool your beer (freezer will have to operate longer - draining more electricity). Also, the lifetime of your freezer would most likely be shortened, because it will have to work harder to cool.

Because of those concerns I built a frame that basically put distance between the freezer walls and the outside covering. The framing is not secured against the freezer in any way. I can still slide the freezer out the back if I need to. I did this so that if my freezer breaks for whatever reason I can replace it with the same model, without having to build a brand new keezer. The picture you were looking at was just during my assembling of the keezer. The plywood no longer separates from the frame.

Hope that helps, if you need any more help feel free to ask.
 

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I have seen your pictures of the front and side panels and wanted to know how the framing and 1/4 or 1/8 inch inserts were joined? Looks like you inserted the thin panel into the 1 by 2. Any sketch of what you did?
 
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I have seen your pictures of the front and side panels and wanted to know how the framing and 1/4 or 1/8 inch inserts were joined? Looks like you inserted the thin panel into the 1 by 2. Any sketch of what you did?
The plywood panels were attached to the oak borders by routing the inside edge of the oak borders the same thickness of the plywood. I then glued the panels in from behind.

I used dowel joints to connect all of the larger pieces together. You can buy an inexpensive dowel joint maker from any hardware store which will allow you to make the joints with a cordless drill.

I attached the paneling to the framing using wood glue and finishing nails in a nail gun. I added woody putty to hide the nails, sanded everything down even, and then stained and sealed.

I'll see if I can find any pictures from when I made this that might help.
 

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The plywood panels were attached to the oak borders by routing the inside edge of the oak borders the same thickness of the plywood. I then glued the panels in from behind.

I used dowel joints to connect all of the larger pieces together. You can buy an inexpensive dowel joint maker from any hardware store which will allow you to make the joints with a cordless drill.

I attached the paneling to the framing using wood glue and finishing nails in a nail gun. I added woody putty to hide the nails, sanded everything down even, and then stained and sealed.

I'll see if I can find any pictures from when I made this that might help.
Pictures would be great! I think I understand though and never investigated the dowel maker. I am so close to pulling the plug and trying this myself.
 
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Pictures would be great! I think I understand though and never investigated the dowel maker. I am so close to pulling the plug and trying this myself.
I say go for it. You'll learn a lot in the process. Just remember always practice on a scrap piece before trying the real deal. Especially true when working with the dowel rig. Fortunately you'll have to build the framing first which can have some imperfection since it will be hidden in the end.

---Still looking for pictures. But looking like I posted everything I took in this thread.
 
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