Another jockey box foam help?

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46andbrew

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So we just recently poured out DIPA at a brew fest as part of the home brew comp. We had a small jockey box that had major foam issues so we had to pour out of pitchers as a back up plan. It worked but killed our aroma. We killed it at the fest and came in 5th but I can't help thinking if the box worked correctly could it have been better.

So we returned that one and bought a little better more expensive one. We are pouring at another brew fest so we wanted to do a test run. A pale ale and still major foam issues. Cold keg force carbed and the box full of ice water. I noticed that there was 2 types of foam in the glass. A nice thick creamy foam sitting below a very airy looking big bubble foam. We checked for air leaked and could not find anything.

Someone help!! We want to kill it at this comp and a properly working box would help a lot.
 
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Foaming in a jockey box is usually caused by the same issues you see in a kegerator.

Longer serving lines tend to help.

Also, keep as much of the beer line as you can inside the jockey box and keep the keg cool if possible.

Are you using a coil or a cold plate?
 

KegHead

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As others have stated:

-what is your serving pressure

-what is your line length and OD (or is it cold plate)

-what are your jumper lines? Length, ID etc
 
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46andbrew

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It's a 50' stainless coil inside and about a 4' plastic tube outside not sure of the diameters I don't have it in front of me right now
 
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46andbrew

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Also we tried a few different pressures staters @ 8 psi and worked down from there
 

KegHead

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Sounds like youre not serving at high enough pressure to keep the co2 in the beer.

Maybe try a choke of 3/16 ID beer line from the 50' to the shank. You can play with different lengths to basically make sure youre able to increase pressure.
 

KegHead

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Yes, youre relying on the increased pressure to keep the co2 in the warm/warming beer in the keg, jumper line and coil.

30-35 psi is typically recommended. There are a lot of variables that can affect jockeybox performance but your biggest issue seems to be pressure.

That loose foam will come out all day long with very low pressure.
 

Peruvian802

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Yes, youre relying on the increased pressure to keep the co2 in the warm/warming beer in the keg, jumper line and coil.

30-35 psi is typically recommended. There are a lot of variables that can affect jockeybox performance but your biggest issue seems to be pressure.

That loose foam will come out all day long with very low pressure.

I just had the same problem at a comp. last Saturday. I kept trying to bleed extra pressure from the keg and lowering the PSI and was actually adding the problem? Interesting. Thank you.
 

KegHead

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Without enough line resistance, it can be difficult to simply add pressure and get the pour you need as well.

Generally speaking though, If you cant keep the keg, jumper lines and coil and a relatively steady state temperature....you need to set it up for higher pressure.

I have used a jockey box at lower pressures (12-15), but a lot of other variables were helping me in that case.

Lastly...i know this is obvious but an aggitated keg will also be hell to dispense.
 
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46andbrew

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Thanks a lot keg head this is great info the only thing that sucks is now we won't be able to try it until the competition all well we always have a backup plan
 

ChemistBrewer

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Yes, youre relying on the increased pressure to keep the co2 in the warm/warming beer in the keg, jumper line and coil.

30-35 psi is typically recommended. There are a lot of variables that can affect jockeybox performance but your biggest issue seems to be pressure.

That loose foam will come out all day long with very low pressure.

This. Most have to be in the 30-35psi range. That's what I serve at. That sounds like your problem.
 

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