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Another "Did I Screw Up" Thread

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Kpfeifle0306

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Hi All,
So I made up my first batch a couple days ago, a 1 gallon kit of Caribou Slobber from NB. I think brewing went fine, and I pitched the yeast 3 days ago. For the first 2 days, I had an active head with a lot of co2 through the blow off tube. After 2 days, the head collapsed and I replaced the blow off tube with an airlock. It was bubbling at a reduced rate...so all looked good. So my problem, at the end of day 3, I see no bubbles at all in the airlock. Unfortunately my temps have been a bit higher then optimal. First two days between 68 and 72 degrees. However, my min/max thermometer shows I hit 80 for some amount of time....could this have killed off the yeast? I'm in a small apartment and don't have a good way to control temps ( no basement). As it gets cooler outside, I should have much better luck controlling the temps....so next time should be better. My question is what about this batch, should I wait it out and try bottling or is it ruined? Note that at this time I have no ability to test for SG, I'm guessing that will have to change. So, what do you think?

Kevin
 
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Kpfeifle0306

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Cool, will do. I'm in this for the long haul, so it will be interesting to see. I have additional fermenters and more kits inbound. Thinking I might need a small fridge and a Johnson control device at some point. Just not sure the size of a small fridge would hold 2 1 gallon bottles with airlocks.
 
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Nope the 80's didn't kill the yeast, in fact made them more active. Even with good temperature control, active, VISIBLE signs of fermentation can be gone after 3-4 days. But don't let that fool you, the fermentation is not finished. The yeast will continue to work, slowly dropping the sg, finishing up the more complex sugars they missed in the 1st feeding frenzy, and cleaning up byproducts that you really don't want around. So, Leave her alone for another week or two before thinking about bottling. And, for temperature control, look up 'swamp cooler'. Most yeast strains do much better with temps in the low to mid 60's.
Good luck, and welcome to the obsession! :mug:
 

gkal1964

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Relax. You are fine. Sounds like a totally normal fermentation. Airlock activity usually stop after a few days. The yeast are still working though. Just leave it for a few weeks to clean up. No need to do anything other than try to keep the temperature at a Constant temperature. Remember airlock activity is not the best barometer for the fermentation. It's Just of the factors you can use. Good luck
 
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