Amylase in the mash?

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rabeb25

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So lets say I had a grain bill like this:

13.75 rye
12.5 2 row
5lbs brewers grade corn syrup
12g batch
Og of about 1.070 FG 1.017

What if I wanted to get that thing to attenuate down to the low 1.0's besides mashing at 147 for 90 minutes, would amylase be useful here??? If so when/how much would you add??

thanks
Bryan
 

z987k

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mash at that temp for that time, pitch the correct quantity of yeast and a yeast that is highly attenuative and I don't see any reason it shouldn't get down there without adding enzyme.
 

schweaty

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Wowza, thats ALOT of rye! I've never seen a bill with 50%!
Just make sure you use an appropriate sized starter and a yeast with a high attenuation.
 

z987k

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Wowza, thats ALOT of rye! I've never seen a bill with 50%!
Just make sure you use an appropriate sized starter and a yeast with a high attenuation.
yeah, he should probably consider a fair amount of rice hulls.
 

schweaty

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yeah, he should probably consider a fair amount of rice hulls.
I'll second the rice hulls. I'd use a whole damn sauce pot full after my last experience with rye. I only had a 25% rye bill and got my first (and hopefully last) stuck sparge. I even used rice hulls, but only a few handfulls. I think part of my problem was that I crushed the rye way too fine, so avoid doing that too! :)
 

TheChemist

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B-amylase, which is the kind you want for low final gravity, is active as low as 60C, so you could even drop your mash temp by another few degrees if you're looking to go extreme. Adding more enzyme won't make a difference - you have enough modified malt that the addition of more wouldn't really affect anything.

The alcohol that's produced will also help 'dilute' your beer, and bring the FG down even further (which is why some beers can actually be under the 1.000 mark). Keep in mind that the rye taste, in addition to the extra alcohol from the corn syrup, will make for a dry tasting beer - you do want SOME dextrins left to balance that out! :p Have fun!
 
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