Aluminum yard stick - Safe to use as liquid volume measure?

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bondra76

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I use a yard stick. Make sure you clean it all the time and I use it right after I shut off the boil when the wort's still hot. You could use it in your brew process all the way to the point of when the boil is over. You probably want to refrain from using it when the wort's cooled down.
 
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eko

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Thanks for the replies and ideas. I went ahead and used it Saturday before any responses came in. Figured one time couldn't hurt & I could judge how much of the 'ink' (whatever it is) came off. Post-use it looks exactly the same.

I like this idea though, may have to do it next time:
Calibrate from the top of the kettle, then only the very tip of the yard stick touches or gets near the wort.
My primary concern was getting enough sparged, so took a measurement before I boiled to make sure I was at 7.5 gallons. But then also as the boil was nearing completion I wanted to know how much I had boiled off. And I wasn't about to use it after the boil was done. Is it accurate to take a reading while the wort is boiling? I thought I read somewhere that the volume will change based on the temp (say 212F vs. 75F) - is that true and if so is it a significant change?
 

nutty_gnome

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I have been using a metal yard stick too... like WilserBrew suggests, don't stick it in the liquid, just measure from the liquid level up. The yardstick is overkill and unwieldy. I am going to buy one of the small stainless ones sold at http://scales-rules.com/ The price is right. A 6 incher clipped in the kettle from the lip down would be perfect for me. The hard part will be to set the pot up level. Mine never is--- I end up taking the average of the high and low side which can range as much as half an inch over the 16 inch diameter of the pot! But for $3.50 - you can't beat this http://scales-rules.com/collections...s/6-rigid-rule-50ths-10ths-decimal-equivalent . It even reads in 10ths of inches which is what my spreadsheet is set up for.
 

laradactyl

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I made an aluminum dip stick for my kettle. Just an aluminum bar with graduation lines made using a triangular file and roman numerals due to me not being able to find my number stamps. It works fine for me.

2014-11-18 11.01.38.jpg
 
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eko

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If I had a spoon big enough (that's another issue I've been ignoring/working-around) or a strip of aluminum or SS big enough, I would've gone one of those routes. A dip tube may be in my future, although I'd been thinking I'd first add one to my HLT. Once I get a HLT. Working on that first. And maybe some kind of fermentation chamber. The system is coming together slowly, but it's still making good beer.
 

dmcman73

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Or you can try this: http://makezine.com/projects/make-40/etch-a-kettle/

I use a sight gauge in my HLT but not on my BK. I've heard a lot of pros and cons (sometimes to many cons) in using a sight gauge on a BK (hops plugging it up, cleaning, leaking from the vigorous boil, the plastic ones becoming brittle and cracking from the heat after some time, etc).

I marked my plastic paddle I have with a Xacto knife to measure the volume but now I think I am going to try and etch it on the brew kettle wall like the article.

EDIT: If you do use this etching process, make sure you do it outdoors since etching or even welding Stainless steel produces Hexavalent chromium which is a carcinogen. After etching, wash your kettle well with PBW and then passivate it again to treat the freshly etched areas.
 

runkelia

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They sell wood dowels Hobby Lobby for $1.30, that pretty cheap.
I marked each end for different kettles I use.
 

GrogNerd

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i use an aluminum yardstick, it works fine

love that my 30qt kettle is exactly 15 inches tall. 2 quarts per inch, makes it so effin' easy

keep it clean and observe sanitary conditions like everything else and you'll be fine
 
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eko

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Or you can try this: http://makezine.com/projects/make-40/etch-a-kettle/

...

EDIT: If you do use this etching process, make sure you do it outdoors since etching or even welding Stainless steel produces Hexavalent chromium which is a carcinogen. After etching, wash your kettle well with PBW and then passivate it again to treat the freshly etched areas.
Thanks for the link. I had stumbled on the same process in these forums some months back. Had forgotten about it, but found it in my notes:

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f257/how-add-permanent-volume-markings-kettle-illustrated-463099/
 
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