Alpha amylase powder

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uwmgdman

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Hi all....

I'll be making my crack at a partial mash rye this Saturday. The partial mash is going to consist of 3 lb Pale Malt (or maybe 6-row?), 1/2 lb Crystal 40L, and 2 lbs flaked rye (and probably some rice hulls). I know this will be rather sticky, but aside from that should I consider adding Alpha amylase powder to help the conversion of rye starch to sugars? I'm concerned my base malt to rye ratio maybe a bit low seeing as flaked rye has zero diastic power.

Thanks,

Justin

:mug:
 

clayof2day

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You should be fine. Modern 2-row malts have enough to convert themselves and then some. I think you'll be OK, but someone on here will know better than I.
 

Evan!

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Wouldn't the addition of some, not all, 6-row provide excess enzymes, instead of going straight for the amylase powder?
 
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uwmgdman

uwmgdman

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It would I just wasn't sure if I needed anything in addition to what the grain provides. I never have used a flaked adjunct before.
 

psymn

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It's a personal decision. The malt will have more than enough amylase to convert the Rye, but it might take a little more time in the mash.

I often treat my mashes with different enzymes. Alpha-amylase will make the resulting wort less fermentable resulting in more malt and sweetness in your final beer. Beta-Glucanase would make the wort more fermentable.

Adding either enzyme will increase effiecncy of your mash, and should shorten the time needed.

As an experiment, I added 5ml of each to a ESB a few months ago. The goal was to reassure myself that the enzyems were working. I had great conversion in about 40 minutes, but the resulting beer was too sweet. Lesson learned.

Another experiement I tried was to brew a "low carb" lager for my diabetic relatives. By keeping the mash temp close to 137, and using beta-glucanase, I was able to make a beer that tasted low carb, but I do not have the testing equipment to verify this observation. I actually found this beer to be rather enjoyable on warm days.


Good luck,

matt
 

zoebisch01

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psymn said:
It's a personal decision. The malt will have more than enough amylase to convert the Rye, but it might take a little more time in the mash.
I learned this recently. It took me a full 90 minutes for conversion in a batch, which is almost 3 times when I normally see conversion. These were all modern fully modified malts but their respective Lintner ratings were different. I had one 'black box' element which was my malted wheat, and in the end it became apparent that it was indeed the culprit. So either the Munton's wasn't fully modified (?) or it was very low on the Lintner scale.
 

Tony

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This is what Breiss says about their flaked Rye:

Pregelatinized Rye Flakes have been produced specifically for brewing, developing characteristics necessary for easy and efficient use in a brewhouse. The process of gelatinizing makes the starches readily soluble and digestible by the naturally occurring enzymes in barley malt. This allows the flakes to be incorporated directly into the mash with other grains.
Because flakes have a large surface area and are pre-cooked, they hydrate and disintegrate quickly. Filtration time will be normal.
 

david_42

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I would use the enzyme, if you have it handy, and the rice hulls. I've had trouble with rye any time I've gone over 20%. If you haven't purchased your grains, consider using half rye malt and half flaked.
 
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