Alpha Amylase Enzymes

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toorudez

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Is there a calculator for how much to add to the mash? I'm brewing a GF Belgian Ale using Pale Millet, Buckwheat and Flaked Oats. I've found one recipe online which uses about the same amount of grain (10#) and uses 1 tsp of enzymes during mash.

Edit:
I added 1.5 tsp so we will see what happens.
Mash @ 73C for 120 mins.
 
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toorudez

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Did an iodine test after the 2 hour mark and it turned black. So I added another teaspoon of enzyme to the kettle; temp sitting at 66C, preboil gravity 1.020. I'm really hoping this works otherwise it's back to the drawing board..
 

stpug

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73c may have been your problem with the first rest
66c should be better but you might consider a boil water addition about 45 minutes into the rest to get up to 70c to finish it off.

Please let us know how it works out.
 

MrFancyPlants

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When doing a malt mash, most of us use the naturally occuring enzymes in malt which contains alpha and bata amalyse.. and some others. We usually mash around 62f to favor the beta amalyse enzyme since that is the one that does the actual starch conversion whereas alpha amalyse does debranching. maybe try adding another teaspoon and bringing down your mash temp and hope there is some beta in your enzyme as well? You could try adding a beano tab into your mash as well since you'll also be able to denature that enzyme in your boil. Or add your amalyse enzyme to the fermenter after the boil. It works at lower temperatures but just might take a couple weeks. Also note your gravity reading will look low while your wart is at elevated temperatures.. there are converters out there on the web if you don't want to wait for it to cool. If your starting gravity is really that low, you might consider adding some honey to boost the gravity up to at least a 1.040 or so.

good luck
 
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toorudez

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Using the Brewer's Friend hydrometer reading calculator, the adjusted preboil gravity is 1.036. The wort does have a sweet taste to it, although there is still some starch in it. I'm letting it sit in the kettle for a bit before bringing it to a boil. The recipe for this brew is as follows:

3.5 kg Pale Millet
0.5 kg Toasted Buckwheat
0.5 kg Flaked Oats
1.0 kg Rice Hulls
1.0 kg Honey (added at 10 mins)

30g Millenium Hops @ 60 mins

Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast
 

glutarded-chris

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I have been doing partial mashes and all grain batches for some time now and have never passed the starch test. I suspect the buckwheat has "tough" starch. I have had some really great beers IMHO. I would just brew it and not worry about starch test. If you are 15 to 23 ppg then you are doing just fine.
 
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toorudez

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Brew day complete! Final volume of 20L and an OG of 1.050. Pitched the yeast and now the waiting game begins! It smelt like wort should so perhaps that is a good sign?
 
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toorudez

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Day 2 Update: Fermentation is well underway! The airlock is bubbling like crazy!!
 
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