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All Grain from MINIMAL GRAIN VARIENTS?

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wdoyle1980

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just about all the AG recipes I've seen call for about 5+ different grains. I'm not COMPLETELY NOVICE, but still very much a beginner. Most of the batches I've done have been malt extract kits. I'd like to try an all-grain batch. Anyone got any recipes for an AG beginner that has, like 2 different grains : like 10#s of 2/6-row and X#s of Scottish Smoked Peat or Chocolate roasted something ? I'd LOVE to try something that doesn't come out of a F$%^'in CAN, but i can't break the bank having to buy 10# bags of 5-10 different grains + hops.... to brew 5gals for $100.... help


~TheDoyle
 

Born Brewing Co.

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Don't knock brewing out of a can, those kits make some damn fine beer. However, I feel your pain and am going AG myself, today infact.

Most HBS will sell 1lb. bags of grain. You will probably need a 10lb. bag of your base grain and then several pounds of specialty grains. Even if you had 4-5 different grains, it shouldn't cost you more than $30.00. Each subsequent batch will cost less because you'll have some grain on hand.

I just had to buy a 1lb. bag of roasted barley. I only used 2oz. from that bag. I sealed the bag and put it in the freezer, hence, I won't have to buy roasted barley for sometime, cutting down on cost of the next batch.

A good Irish Red Ale beginner AG recipe, single infusion:

7.25 lb Briess Pale Ale Malt
1.0 lb Briess 10L Caramel Malt
3 oz Briess Extra Special Malt
2 oz Briess Roasted Barley
.5 lbs Honey

1.5 oz E.K. Goldings, 4.75% alpha acid (60 minutes)
.5 oz E.K. Goldings, 4.75% alpha acit (15 minutes)

White Labs WLP004 Irish Ale Yeast

Good Luck!! :cool:
 

Dude

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Going to all-grain will require another equipment investment, so if you don't have the means for that, there is nothing wrong with sticking with extract. At least until you can buy the new equipment.
I made some pretty good beers with extract. Just start improving the way you do it each time--next time steep some specialty grains, or maybe sometime try a mini-mash. The quality of your beer will improve every time.

You certainly cannot go wrong doing extract with specialty grains. Its quite easy!
 

andre the giant

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I found that a 1lb bag of Cara-pils, or Crystal, or Vienna, or Munich, or Roasted Barley malt was usually $2 or $3. Many of the recipies I've made call for 1/2 or 1/4 lb amounts of these malts. The leftovers can be stored in the freezer and used later.

Most recipies call for Pale Malt and that's pretty cheap as well. I can get 50 lbs of Breiss 2 row for $38. (enough to make roughly five batches of beer.)

All grain is cheaper. It's definitely not $100 per 5 gal batch. More like $13.50 per batch. That's a bargain.
 

Justin Chomel

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Why not a simple pale ale? Say 10 pounds of 2-row and a pound of Crystal 40. Mash at 152 degrees. 1.5 ounces of Cascade at 60 minutes, .5 at 15, and another half ounce at 1 minute. 1056 yeast. Adjust to your liking, I'm just thinking on my feet here. Although it's a simple beer, it will none the less be a quality, drinkable brew.

Have you visited Beer Tools? I used their recipe generator when I first started out in all grain to create some base recipes.

-JC
 

Catullus

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Born Brewing Co. said:
I just had to buy a 1lb. bag of roasted barley. I only used 2oz. from that bag. I sealed the bag and put it in the freezer, hence, I won't have to buy roasted barley for sometime, cutting down on cost of the next batch.
I would recommend against storing your un-used grain in the freezer. Moister is detrimental to grain quality (freshness). Malted grain contains a certain amount of water, usually 3-8%. If you have a frostless freezer then the grains will be going through a number of freeze-thaw cycles. This is extremely detrimental to any grain especially grains with high DP (base malts) as it will cause structural changes in the protein and enzymes and thus may not be able to convert and will give a stale/oxidized taste when mashed.

The best way to store un-used grain is in sealed containers in a cool place with low relative humidity (like Tupperware in a cellar) The container will keep the bugs out and the grain will remain 'fresh' for up to a year.


I remember there was an issue of BYO that went into storage conditions for raw materials--- I can't remember the issue right now. If I find it I'll send a link to the article.


Jason
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Keg: Double Nut Brown
On Tap: Foolish Basterd (Arrogant Basterd clone); Blueberry Wheat
 

tnlandsailor

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Catullus said:
...Moister is detrimental to grain quality (freshness). Malted grain contains a certain amount of water, usually 3-8%. If you have a frostless freezer then the grains will be going through a number of freeze-thaw cycles. This is extremely detrimental to any grain...
This is absolutely dead on. Don't freeze your grains. In fact, dark roasted grains like roasted barley, black patent, and chocolate have been pretty much burnt and will last well beyond the life of base malts like 2-row or Munich. You can keep these dark roasted malts for probably 2 maybe 3 years if stored properly. Just put them in a zip lock and keep them at cellar temps in low humidity.

Prosit,
 
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tnlandsailor said:
This is absolutely dead on. Don't freeze your grains.
ok, then what about a fridg or is it still best to keep them at "room temp". Cellar temps don't happen out here; ever. BTW - the local HBS doesn't keep em in a cooled area so I think I know the answer already...

Oh, by the way TheDoyle. I'll be doing my 1st AG next weekend and am selecting an APA for the same reasons you mentioned. Simple recipe:
9# 2 row
.5# Crystal 60l
Northern Brewer .75 @ 60
Cascade .75 @ 30
Cascade .75 @ 15

Was from John Palmer How To Brew site under his favorite recipes. I up'ed the 2 row a bit for a bigger SG. Think most new AGers start with similar.
 

uglygoat

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i don't store grains, that's what the homebrewshop is for. she sells grain, crushed for about a buck a pound, depending on the grain. i just hand a grain and hop bill to her and she measures and crushes the grain for me.

a typical batch costs about 13-15 bucks.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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wdoyle1980 said:
just about all the AG recipes I've seen call for about 5+ different grains. I'm not COMPLETELY NOVICE, but still very much a beginner. Most of the batches I've done have been malt extract kits. I'd like to try an all-grain batch. Anyone got any recipes for an AG beginner that has, like 2 different grains : like 10#s of 2/6-row and X#s of Scottish Smoked Peat or Chocolate roasted something ? I'd LOVE to try something that doesn't come out of a F$%^'in CAN, but i can't break the bank having to buy 10# bags of 5-10 different grains + hops.... to brew 5gals for $100.... help


~TheDoyle
you don't have to buy your grains in bulk, unless you brew every week and that makes it more convenient (my homebrew shop is 1.5 hours away and i don't). my HBS looks at my recipe, they give me the amount/type of grains i need for it, mill 'em while i wait and drool over gadgets, put 'em in a wax paper bag, and send me on my way. i'll spend $20-25 on ingredients for a 5.5 gallon batch.

i know some will order a 50# bag of 2-row, and then just order/buy their specialty grains as needed. i don't because i have no where to store them properly, and only brew about once every month.

maybe just start by doing extract batches with some steeped grains for added body and character. doesn't require much more (equipment or money-wise), and you'll get a better brew. add liquide yeast, proper ferm temps, and you'll probably match any all-grain beer (probalby fella's, probably :D )
 
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t1master said:
i don't store grains, that's what the homebrewshop is for. she sells grain, crushed for about a buck a pound, depending on the grain. i just hand a grain and hop bill to her and she measures and crushes the grain for me.

a typical batch costs about 13-15 bucks.
That's where I think I'm heading as well T1. Initially I was thinking online order bulk and may someday (thus my question) but if my local hbs will fill the grain recipe even if I only buy .25 of this .5 of that along with the base and then mill it for me I don't have to store it or purchase a mill. $ per lb is in the .90 for your simple amer 2 row and around 1.50 avg for other varieties. Probably a little cheaper online but add a mill, shipping... I'm lucky though that on the way home from work a little detour and I'm right at the hbs.
 

Kephren

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I had thought about buying in bulk. For a fair investment, I could buy enough of everything I use to keep me going for about a year. I don't because I like going to the HBS. I have a routine. I walk in with my recipe.. say hello to everyone sitting at the counter drinking a beer.. put my recipe together, look around to see if I "need" anything else, grab my yeast and an ice-pack, then join the guys at the counter and enjoy a brew and talk about homebrewing for an hour or so. It gives me something to do on a saturday afternoon and it gets me out of my wife's hair for a while.
 

Catullus

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desertBrew said:
That's where I think I'm heading as well T1. Initially I was thinking online order bulk and may someday (thus my question) but if my local hbs will fill the grain recipe even if I only buy .25 of this .5 of that along with the base and then mill it for me I don't have to store it or purchase a mill. $ per lb is in the .90 for your simple amer 2 row and around 1.50 avg for other varieties. Probably a little cheaper online but add a mill, shipping... I'm lucky though that on the way home from work a little detour and I'm right at the hbs.
I only brew in 15-25 gallon batches so I average 35-40+ lbs of grain per batch. For me it is more cost effect to order in bulk. I'll order 350 lbs of base malt for a year ~ 10 -12 batches a year (north country malt) @ $0.46 -0.49/lbs even with shipping I'm saving ~$100.00 vs. the local hbs. I don't like the idea of having ground grain sitting around for even short periods of time. If I can't brew one weekend and have to wait a week or two, the grain will oxidize (stale) much more rapidly due to the increased surface area and lack of protective husk.

Now for storage- I keep them in the sacks in the cellar @ 65-70 F. This is probably a little high but I haven't noticed a problem. If I don't use a full bag I have a Rubbermaid container that I place the rest of the grain in (sack and all). Higher storage temps won't have too much of a negative effect on quality it will just increase the rate of oxidation. I would be more concerned with humidity and consequently mold growth.


Jason
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Keg: Double Nut Brown
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Rookie

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If your LHBS has a decent variety of grains at a decent price there is not much need to store grains. They will sell you the exact amount you need and probably mill it also.
If you have to mail order grains you can store them in an air tight container for quite a long time.
 
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