Air accumulating in line

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cyberwollf

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Just setting my keggerator up. I got some 3/16 bev-seal in a group buy. Running about 16' feet. I have a decently slow pour with some foam, but if I come back 15 minutes later there is alot of air in the line and it sputters for a few seconds until it settles down. If air was getting into the line, would beer be leaking?

After looking at it, it appears bubbles are comming up from the keg and gathering where I have the tubing coiled up... ??

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devilishprune

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Sounds like there might be a pinhole in the tubing somewhere. Can you examine the spot where the bubbles are and verify that there's not a hole in it?
 
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cyberwollf

cyberwollf

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Seems like they are rising up out of the quick disconnect... ???
 
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cyberwollf

cyberwollf

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Just did some more searching. I think its due to the beer being carbed higher than Im serving. The keg was stored at 15psi or so. I vented it and set it at 12 when I put it in the kegerator. I think I might just be re-equalizing and co2 is comming out of solution at its new lower psi

I only drink one a day or so, will it equalize down to 12 or do I need to vent it once a day for a few days?
 

devilishprune

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So here is a post showing the "anatomy" of a QD: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/new-keg-setup-questions-200425/#post2339220

Maybe you need to take it apart/make sure the thing is tight? You have to have a leak somewhere...have you sprayed a bubbly substance on it and checked yet?

EDIT: I just read your post. That seems like it would just make it foam up in your glass, not have air bubbling into the line.
 

airmek

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If there is no beer leaking then its probably just the CO2 coming out of solution.
 
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cyberwollf

cyberwollf

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No beer leaking. I'll just let it sit a few days and see what we have. :)
 

Nuggethead

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Most likely C02 coming out of solution. If you had a way for air to get in, you would also have beer coming out. I have found that most often this happens when you let the keg temperature rise to quickly causing C02 to come out of solution. My keezer is in a garage and got down to 33F during a cold snap, but when the temp rose back to 40F, I had nothing but air in the lines until it equalized again. De-gass several times over a week and reset your psi to where you want it and you should be good to go.
 

lotbfan

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this happens to our kegs at work all the time, i think the bartender once told me to crank up the co2 till it stopped, and i think he mentioned something about the serving temperature and the pressure when you tapped a new keg... man, too many tonight, but yeah, someone above said the same thing... drop some pressure out of solution by venting the keg, and then your standard serving pressure should keep gas from escaping the beer (it tries to equalize of course).
 
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