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adding yeast at bottling time

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Byrdbrewer

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can anyone speak to the best way to add yeast to a batch of beer that you feel may have lost all its active yeast - I have heard of adding yeast to the bottle, to the bottling bucket, all kinds of crazy things. I'm thinking it would be best to add a spec or two two each bottle, but can some of you more experienced brewers please chime in. Thanks - I have a bourbon barrel ale that will be aging for 6 months, and I lost the yeast that came with it so I used safale us-05 (my go to yeast) but I know it does have a tendency to ferment out quick, so I'm preparing for potential future problems. Thanks again in advance for all your advice.
 

Suthrncomfrt1884

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I wouldn't suggest adding it directly to bottles unless you have a very accurate way to measure the yeast. Each bottle will end up a little different.

The best method that I've found for adding yeast after aging for extended periods is to just dump a packet of us-05 into your bottling bucket when you add the sugar solution. Then rack your beer on top and it will evenly mix. You don't even really need a whole packet. 1/3 would probably do it.
 

Yooper

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I wouldn't suggest adding it directly to bottles unless you have a very accurate way to measure the yeast. Each bottle will end up a little different.

The best method that I've found for adding yeast after aging for extended periods is to just dump a packet of us-05 into your bottling bucket when you add the sugar solution. Then rack your beer on top and it will evenly mix. You don't even really need a whole packet. 1/3 would probably do it.
Yes, that's what I do also. I've used 1/3-1/2 a package of dry yeast when I've bottled a beer after long term aging/lagering.
 
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Byrdbrewer

Byrdbrewer

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great, thanks !! should I wait a while after adding the yeast before bottleing, to let the yeast mutiply? otherwise, how can I be certain there will be yeast in all the beer? - bare with me, I had the same lack of confidence in batch priming also lol, I guess I under estimate waters natural tendancy to want to become an even solution.
 

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great, thanks !! should I wait a while after adding the yeast before bottleing, to let the yeast mutiply? otherwise, how can I be certain there will be yeast in all the beer? - bare with me, I had the same lack of confidence in batch priming also lol, I guess I under estimate waters natural tendancy to want to become an even solution.
No, no need to let it sit. What you can do is boil your priming solution, cool it and add it to your bottling bucket. Add the yeast, and wait a few minutes, then stir it with a sanitized spoon. It'll get foamy a bit, and you can rack your beer into it. Trust me, yeast are microscopic. There are billions of them in there and 1/2 package is plenty!
 
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Byrdbrewer

Byrdbrewer

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No, no need to let it sit. What you can do is boil your priming solution, cool it and add it to your bottling bucket. Add the yeast, and wait a few minutes, then stir it with a sanitized spoon. It'll get foamy a bit, and you can rack your beer into it. Trust me, yeast are microscopic. There are billions of them in there and 1/2 package is plenty!
Great, thanks
 

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