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Adding yeast at bottling after 81% apparent attenuation?

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cladinshadows

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When bottling, how do you know the yeast have enough left in them to carb up even if you add sugar? Aren't yeast supposedly good for about 80% attenuation?

Do any of you take the attenuation into consideration when you decide whether or not you need to add yeast before bottling? or does it just work and isn't worth thinking about?
 

Belmont

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I won't pretend to be an expert on this at all but it has always just worked for me when I was bottling. I have heard that certain styles are more prone to needing yeast at bottling but I think these are typically high gravity beers, barley wines, meads, and wines.
 

The Blow Leprechaun

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The sugar you add for priming is so easy for yeast to consume that it's like a vacation. As good as you feel drinking a beer, that's how yeast feel priming it.

The only way where they won't be able to consume it is in crazy extreme circumstances, like a really high gravity beer, or a really long secondary period.
 

Revvy

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Do any of you take the attenuation into consideration when you decide whether or not you need to add yeast before bottling?
Nope never worry about it...unless someone has brewed a huge beer and aged it for several months in secondary, like nearly a year. There is sufficient yeasties to eat the scant amount of fresh sugar added to it....
 
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cladinshadows

cladinshadows

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Nope never worry about it...unless someone has brewed a huge beer and aged it for several months in secondary, like nearly a year. There is sufficient yeasties to eat the scant amount of fresh sugar added to it....
Haha ok. Thanks for the replies everyone.
 
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