Adding Coffee for Coffee & Cream Stout

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prospero

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So the recipe calls for 1/2 cup of coffee and adding it 1-day before racking to secondary.

...

a) That's only 4oz. Does that mean it's coffee grinds (which you would then filter out when racking to secondary)?

b) How do you sanitize ground coffee?

c) Would you just use 16-24oz of steam brewed coffee and chill before putting in primary?

d) Use a coffee press?

e) Use cold-pressed coffee?
 

avidhomebrewer

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I made a porter once that had coffee as an adjunct. I mashed it along with the other grains (whole coffee beans, milled) and it turned out great.

Not sure if you've made your batch already, but, of the options listed, I would basically do a 'mini-mash' and add the grains to about 1 cup of water, heat, and maintain, to about 180 or so, cool, then add to secondary.
 
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prospero

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Yes, it's already in primary, because our recipe said to add 1-day prior to racking to secondary.

So would you assume they mean to take 4oz. of coarse ground coffee beans and boil with a cup of water to sanitize, then drop in primary for a day, then filter during the rack to secondary?
 

ZWood15

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I found a local coffee shop that sells cold coffee toddy in 1/2 gallon jugs and I added that directly into the keg of a stout that was only so-so. I added about a 1/4 gal to 4.5 gal of stout and it made the beer significantly better.
 
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prospero

prospero

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So if it asks for 1/2 cup of grounds, that's equivalent to 8 tbsp of grounds which usually equals 8 cups of coffee right? 8 cups = 64 fl. oz. which is 1/2 gallon of coffee brewed.

So you're saying I should add 1/2 gallon of brewed coffee? Is it a strong coffee flavor or hint?
 

Yankeehillbrewer

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I like to just add the whole coffee beans to the Secondary. I do a 1/4 lb in 5 gallons for 5 days and the coffee flavor is right at the front of the beer. you can adjust it down to make it more subtle. I use espresso beans, so you could probably also use a lighter roast.
 
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prospero

prospero

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I'm just saying, it's not being sanitized, that's a fact. If you're beer still came out great, cheers. I'm just not going to risk it. There's safer methods that get just as good if not better results. Also whole beans could extract oils into the beer reducing head retention. I don't see a whole lot of upside to the whole bean method. I do appreciate the advice though.
 

Yankeehillbrewer

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I'm just saying, it's not being sanitized, that's a fact. If you're beer still came out great, cheers. I'm just not going to risk it. There's safer methods that get just as good if not better results. Also whole beans could extract oils into the beer reducing head retention. I don't see a whole lot of upside to the whole bean method. I do appreciate the advice though.
Yeah it does affect head retention for sure. Seems to me though that you will get those oils into the beer no matter what method you use, but I could be wrong. Wouldn't be the first time.
 
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prospero

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Yea, I have no idea either, some people say use a coffee filter, but I'd think that could reduce the flavor as well... well like every homebrew it will be an experiment right?
 

Yankeehillbrewer

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Yea, I have no idea either, some people say use a coffee filter, but I'd think that could reduce the flavor as well... well like every homebrew it will be an experiment right?
Absolutely, I should venture out and try a different method as well. Better yet I should split a batch and try a couple ways at the same time.
 

Musketear

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Even if the brew was 8% alcohol, it takes at minimum 60% ABV to properly sanitize things, so I don't buy that theory. That's not supported by science.

Dry-hopping you don't have to worry as much because hops are naturally anti-bacterial.

Nevermind, I found the proper answer to this question here:
http://www.madalchemist.com/archives/adding-cold-brewed-coffee-to-your-beer/
I have always used the cold brewing method they suggest in the article, although I have a few additional steps that I include for security. He mentions boiling it, but I find this does change the flavor a bit, and if your picky like me it is unacceptable ;)

I cold brew in my french press, separate it from the grounds, and then pressure cook the liquid in a canning/mason jar. Leave the lid loose or you could cause an explosion. This sterilizes it without actually boiling it, leave the flavor almost unchanged.

If you were worried about head retention, I would think that you could run it through a coffee filter before boiling it. The filter would then retain a large amount of the oils and suspended solids. In my opinion, I don't think it would change the taste too much, but I can't say this from experience.
 

Jakemo

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I have always used the cold brewing method they suggest in the article, although I have a few additional steps that I include for security. He mentions boiling it, but I find this does change the flavor a bit, and if your picky like me it is unacceptable ;)

I cold brew in my french press, separate it from the grounds, and then pressure cook the liquid in a canning/mason jar. Leave the lid loose or you could cause an explosion. This sterilizes it without actually boiling it, leave the flavor almost unchanged.

If you were worried about head retention, I would think that you could run it through a coffee filter before boiling it. The filter would then retain a large amount of the oils and suspended solids. In my opinion, I don't think it would change the taste too much, but I can't say this from experience.

So... theoretically, if you wanted to go the cold-extraction + sterilization method, you could just heat it in a pot at like 180 for 30 minutes? Would that be similar to your pressure-cooker method of sanitization? Or is it the fact that the pressure keeps it from boiling even though it's at 212ish degrees?

Is it the actual boiling that changes the flavor, or just the temperature? I'm guessing it's the actual act of boiling that changes the flavor, since you use the pressure cooker.

I'm going to add coffee to half of my batch of RIS, at bottling. I'm leaning towards the cold-extracted + boiled method, I tried a side-by-side of cold brewed and cold brewed + boiled this weekend. However, I didn't boil it for 10 minutes, thus my question. I'm only going to add about 2 cups total, but make it double-strong for more flavor without noticeably diluting the beer.

Also, for the true coffee buffs out there, will a reusable filter remove as much particulate from the cold-brewed coffee as a paper filter?
 

jtbrewshop

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I made a porter once that had coffee as an adjunct. I mashed it along with the other grains (whole coffee beans, milled) and it turned out great.

Not sure if you've made your batch already, but, of the options listed, I would basically do a 'mini-mash' and add the grains to about 1 cup of water, heat, and maintain, to about 180 or so, cool, then add to secondary.
Hi there thinking of making a stout and adding whole coffee beans to the mill with all the other grains. You've done this before with success? How much did you add to a 5 gallon batch? Thx..
 

jtbrewshop

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I added 2 cups of freshly ground coffee to the last minute of an all grain Irish stout recipe. The end result was perfect. A nice refreshing stout with a hint of coffee!
 
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