Adding carapils for lacing

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Brew2Be

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Hi. I recently brewed a recipe I came up with (this is my recipe but I moved the 60 minute addition to 45: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/will-my-smash-apa-become-too-bitter-454609/).
It was basically just a SMaSH with Maris Otter and Centennial (@45, 10, 5 , 3, 0) and it turned out quite well.

As you can see from the photo it has a fine head (it subsides in a few minutes.. I think thats pretty good?) but no lacing at all.

I was googling around and saw someone recommend carapils or caramunich to obtain lacing. What are your thoughts about it? And what percentage of the grist should be carapils/caramunich?

Here it is:

 

Hammy71

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Carapils can be used to add some body and improve head sustainabilty. I've found lacing usually has a lot to do with the cleanliness of the glass. My glasses only see Oxyclean and most of my beers have really nice lacing. Be a place to start.
 
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Brew2Be

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I like to mash my SMaSH brews at 156 - 158 it gives them more body, I get a good lacing

your brew looks good :)

all the best

S_M
Thanks for the mashing temperature tip. I usually mash at around 154, maybe I should try out the 156-158 range for improving lacing / body.
 
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Brew2Be

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Carapils can be used to add some body and improve head sustainabilty. I've found lacing usually has a lot to do with the cleanliness of the glass. My glasses only see Oxyclean and most of my beers have really nice lacing. Be a place to start.
Thanks for the input. Maybe it is as simple as that (in my case).
 

Beernik

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Does the torrified wheat give any clarity issues with your brew?
Not at all.

Torrified wheat is puffed wheat. It's heat treated too to break down all the cellular walls and allow enzymes to attack the starches and proteins more easily. Also, it's basically it's what Honey Smacks cereal is made of.

If you have a good hot break and a good cold break, 4 - 8 oz of wheat in 5 gallons isn't going to cause enough chill haze forming material to be noticeable. And if you are worried about it, throw in a protein rest into your mash schedule.

I suppose what I like about torrified wheat vs Carapils is that torrified wheat is as fermentable as a all your other grains. Carapils isn't. That means Carapils can leave you higher on your FG than you might want.
 

Calichusetts

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I get fantastic lacing with carapils. I have yet to find the perfect rhyme or reason for getting great results but my last four batches have had some amazing lacing. Different recipes, different mash temps, etc.

EDIT- Actually, my last batch had no carapils, but great lacing. No idea how it happens.
 

hou_me

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I've also had great luck with carapils. Especially in an ipa I just made. I was using fresh hops and added plenty of carapils to get a nice aromatic head. I don't know if it helped with the lacing or not as I usually get pretty good lacing on most of my batches. I haven't heard of using tried torrified wheat yet. Maybe on the next batch.

-ben
 

Yooper

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I almost never use carapils. I have one recipe, a BoPils that is 95% pilsner malt and 5% carapils- otherwise I don't use it.

But AnOldUR on this forum sold me on a bit of wheat malt (or torrified wheat, or even flaked wheat) in many IPAs and APAs and I get killer head retention and lacing with no haze.

If I forget, though, and I often do- just the hops themselves do a lot for head and lacing in the beer.

Before thinking that the head retention in this beer is lacking, I'd do a salt water scrub on the glass and see if it's the beer or the glass at fault.

For the salt water scrub, just moisten your glass and sprinkle inside with salt. Use your fingers, and make the salt into a scouring powder and run it all through the glass and around the rim. Rinse well, dry the glass, and then pour the beer. Make sure you glass is always room temperature- never chilled or hot from being washed. That helps, too!
 
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Brew2Be

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Thanks for the inputs and clarification on this subject. Interesting points for me to consider for my next batch / pour. Thanks again.
 
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