Adapter for 3-prong dryer outlet??

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obeahsf

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Is there any reason not to use this to convert my NEMA 10-30 dryer outlet to L6-30 required for my brew rig?

http://evseupgrade.com/?main_page=product_info&products_id=17

I was told by the supplier that he could not sell it to me, without having a car registered with them (you don't actually need a VIN). My hunch is that their insurance policy doesn't allow them to sell for purposes other than EV charging. It has to just be standard plug, receptacle, and cord, right? I'd much prefer to buy something off-the-shelf to hacking one together with amazon parts like:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00S983MVE/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

and

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0095GKC8U/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

I'm not even sure those two are compatible.

Thanks for any thoughts on the subject!
 
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z-bob

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Is there any reason not to use this to convert my NEMA 10-30 dryer outlet to L6-30 required for my brew rig?

http://evseupgrade.com/?main_page=product_info&products_id=17

I was told by the supplier that he could not sell it to me, without having a car registered with them (you don't actually need a VIN). My hunch is that their insurance policy doesn't allow them to sell for purposes other than EV charging. It has to just be standard plug, receptacle, and cord, right? I'd much prefer to buy something off-the-shelf to hacking one together with amazon parts like:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00S983MVE/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

and

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0095GKC8U/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

I'm not even sure those two are compatible.

Thanks for any thoughts on the subject!

NEMA 10 and NEMA 6 are compatible.
 
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LuckyBeagleBrewing

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One thing to think about if you are using 220 on your brew rig is GFCI. If you are using 220 for heating elements then you might be better served getting the individual cords and running them through a GFCI spa panel. I know it is a little more expensive but it will also keep you from getting zapped. It is never fun to have that happen.
 

doug293cz

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One thing to think about if you are using 220 on your brew rig is GFCI. If you are using 220 for heating elements then you might be better served getting the individual cords and running them through a GFCI spa panel. I know it is a little more expensive but it will also keep you from getting zapped. It is never fun to have that happen.

^^^ What @LuckyBeagleBrewing said. ^^^ You really need to have GFCI protection on the feed to your control panel. A three wire dryer outlet is extremely unlikely to have pre-existing GFCI protection. So, you probably need a spa panel for GFCI. Just use your 10-30 plug cord for input to the spa panel, and use an L6-30 receptacle on the output of the spa panel.

Does your brew rig not require any 120V? Cause if you do need 120V in your control panel, then you can't use an L6-30.

Brew on :mug:
 
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obeahsf

obeahsf

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^^^ What @LuckyBeagleBrewing said. ^^^ You really need to have GFCI protection on the feed to your control panel. A three wire dryer outlet is extremely unlikely to have pre-existing GFCI protection. So, you probably need a spa panel for GFCI. Just use your 10-30 plug cord for input to the spa panel, and use an L6-30 receptacle on the output of the spa panel.

Does your brew rig not require any 120V? Cause if you do need 120V in your control panel, then you can't use an L6-30.

Brew on :mug:

I do appreciate the nod on GFCI (as I definitely don't want to zap anything or anyone), but I have addressed that issue. I'm currently just looking to adapt L6-30 to 10-30 dryer cord.

I ordered an inline GFCI with the following specs:
30 Amp, 240 Volt, Manual Reset, 2' Molded L6-30 Plug and Connector PGFI-23011 - $142
from:
http://gfcistore.com/30-amp-inline-gfcis.html

It seems like I may have gotten by with less money having gone with a spa panel. Since I have to take down my brewery after every use, inline seemed more portable than a hardwired panel. Maybe that's a mistake, but it sure seems like it will work. I do want to address the question of the product mentioned initially, as the gent would not sell to me for this application. The molded plug is clean and easy. Would probably go with the other two pieces I mentioned otherwise. Just seems a bit janky though. Those wires on the dryer plugs are bulky.

Yes, I have two needs for 120v from my pumps. It does not seem like anyone else have a problem with this on their 240v panel.

Essentially I just want to make that GFCI comaptible with my dryer outlet.
 
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obeahsf

obeahsf

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One thing to think about if you are using 220 on your brew rig is GFCI. If you are using 220 for heating elements then you might be better served getting the individual cords and running them through a GFCI spa panel. I know it is a little more expensive but it will also keep you from getting zapped. It is never fun to have that happen.

I have one from http://gfcistore.com/30-amp-inline-gfcis.html - $240

Inline/manual reset. It actually seems the spa panel may have been a bit cheaper. Since I need to move this thing around quite a bit though, inline seemed the way to go. Now, though, I still need to adapt L6-30 plug to 10-30 receptacle.
 

z-bob

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I would probably have bought a replacement dryer cord with a molded plug, and put a L6-30R socket on the end.

Or replaced the power cord on whatever with an extra-long dryer cord.
 

plazola86

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That's exactly how I have my set up. Inline GFCI L6-30 hooked up to an evse adapter plugged into my dryer outlet. Everything works just like it supposed too, haven't had a problem. Just for safety though I turn off my breaker every time I plug and unplug anything.
 
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obeahsf

obeahsf

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That's exactly how I have my set up. Inline GFCI L6-30 hooked up to an evse adapter plugged into my dryer outlet. Everything works just like it supposed too, haven't had a problem. Just for safety though I turn off my breaker every time I plug and unplug anything.

Thank you very much! I appreciate the response.
 

JONNYROTTEN

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A $10 dryer cord
$50 spa panel
A couple of receptacles
and a 10G extension cord from HF has served me well for years

You mentioned breaking it down after every use, same as me
I unplug the dryer, plug in the exact same dryer cord only leading to your spa panel,run the extension cord to your brew area and brew away...My 25 ft extension cord runs up the basement stairs to my kitchen where I brew.
Roll up the cord and plug the dryer back in and the brew day never happened...easy easy
 

doug293cz

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I do appreciate the nod on GFCI (as I definitely don't want to zap anything or anyone), but I have addressed that issue. I'm currently just looking to adapt L6-30 to 10-30 dryer cord.

I ordered an inline GFCI with the following specs:
30 Amp, 240 Volt, Manual Reset, 2' Molded L6-30 Plug and Connector PGFI-23011 - $142
from:
http://gfcistore.com/30-amp-inline-gfcis.html

It seems like I may have gotten by with less money having gone with a spa panel. Since I have to take down my brewery after every use, inline seemed more portable than a hardwired panel. Maybe that's a mistake, but it sure seems like it will work. I do want to address the question of the product mentioned initially, as the gent would not sell to me for this application. The molded plug is clean and easy. Would probably go with the other two pieces I mentioned otherwise. Just seems a bit janky though. Those wires on the dryer plugs are bulky.

Yes, I have two needs for 120v from my pumps. It does not seem like anyone else have a problem with this on their 240v panel.

Essentially I just want to make that GFCI comaptible with my dryer outlet.

To get 120V in your control panel, you need to have a four wire feed (2 hots, neutral, and ground.) An L6-30 only allows for three wires. Your in-line GFCI probably won't work (it will trip every time you draw any 120V current) since it is wired to only check current flowing thru the two hot wires. Any 120V current would flow to the ground (or neutral, depending on how you use the third wire), causing unbalanced current thru the two hots, which will trip the GFCI. A four wire GFCI sums the currents in both hots AND neutral, so can handle 120V currents (which flow from one hot to neutral.) There is a way to wire up a spa panel w/GFCI to avoid this issue. See the diagram below.

Spa Panel w 3-wire feed.jpg

Brew on :mug:
 

z-bob

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Shooting from the hip here, but if the pump load is small enough, you can use a 240:120V transformer (like a European travel power adapter) to supply the 120V load without unbalancing the 240V.
 

doug293cz

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Shooting from the hip here, but if the pump load is small enough, you can use a 240:120V transformer (like a European travel power adapter) to supply the 120V load without unbalancing the 240V.
That will work.

Brew on :mug:
 

augiedoggy

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or avoid 120v pumps all together and go with either the 240v versions or a DC pump like the TD5 or the p38i pumps.. I just completed a new arduino based control panel and only ran 3 wire 240 to it since there really isnt anything I have that needs 120v off it if you already have the pump though I could see the reason to try to make it work.
 
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obeahsf

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or avoid 120v pumps all together and go with either the 240v versions or a DC pump like the TD5 or the p38i pumps.. I just completed a new arduino based control panel and only ran 3 wire 240 to it since there really isnt anything I have that needs 120v off it if you already have the pump though I could see the reason to try to make it work.

Dumb question here regarding TD5:
I'm assuming the answer is drop the adapter and hardwire it, but what would you say it the best way to connect the TD5. The receptacles I have are standard 120v, so it seems I'd end up in the same boat using the AC/DC adapter.

Thanks all.
 
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obeahsf

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To get 120V in your control panel, you need to have a four wire feed (2 hots, neutral, and ground.) An L6-30 only allows for three wires. Your in-line GFCI probably won't work (it will trip every time you draw any 120V current) since it is wired to only check current flowing thru the two hot wires. Any 120V current would flow to the ground (or neutral, depending on how you use the third wire), causing unbalanced current thru the two hots, which will trip the GFCI. A four wire GFCI sums the currents in both hots AND neutral, so can handle 120V currents (which flow from one hot to neutral.) There is a way to wire up a spa panel w/GFCI to avoid this issue. See the diagram below.

View attachment 389764

Brew on :mug:

Shoot. Well, better that I found out before I started cutting holes in the enclosure. I guess I would consider dropping my Chugger pumps and grabbing the Topsflo DC versions. I already own the inline GFCI though as well as panel mounts and plugs for L6-30. I'm not totally sure I can return all that stuff.

I certainly appreciate all the expertise on here. Really figuring things out as I go with electrical. It's all Greek to me, and my proficiency is very limited.
 

doug293cz

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Shoot. Well, better that I found out before I started cutting holes in the enclosure. I guess I would consider dropping my Chugger pumps and grabbing the Topsflo DC versions. I already own the inline GFCI though as well as panel mounts and plugs for L6-30. I'm not totally sure I can return all that stuff.

I certainly appreciate all the expertise on here. Really figuring things out as I go with electrical. It's all Greek to me, and my proficiency is very limited.

Look into using a 240V to 120V transformer (as mentioned by @z-bob above.) That way you can use the pumps you already have. A Chugger pump is rated to use 1.4A, plus they have a start-up surge current which is higher. I'd look for a [email protected] ([email protected]) transformer.

Brew on :mug:
 

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Dumb question here regarding TD5:
I'm assuming the answer is drop the adapter and hardwire it, but what would you say it the best way to connect the TD5. The receptacles I have are standard 120v, so it seems I'd end up in the same boat using the AC/DC adapter.

Thanks all.

Its better us use a 24V dc powersupply installed in the panel IMHO those wall wort powersupplies are kind of on the weak side usually and have a fairly high failure rate unless its a good one.
the switching DC powersupplies usually run on 240v no problem... I use 24v food grade P38I pumps wired this way with pwm speed control to turn down flow when wanted.
 
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obeahsf

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Well. I thought I just had a small question, but seems I have made some gross miscalculations. :) At least I didn't get it all wired up beforehand. Thanks all. I am really learning about electric as I go. Seems like I have a few options here, but they will require selling or swapping some of my gear to get new items.

Option 1: Sell my brand new Chugger pumps and opt for the 24v DC pumps. Again, I am super confused as to how to wire them. Obviously, if I keep the 3 prong plugs, I cannot use the AC adapter. For my enclosure, do they need to be hardwired to DIN rail component? Is there a panel mount plug system I could use to make them detachable? Using DC power is attractive, but I'm not sure how to wire it up.

Option 2: Return my inline GFCI. Install a GFI Spa Panel to convert from 3-wire dryer outlet to 4 wire 240v L14-30 and wire the pumps like Kal. So, 3 prong L6-30 for my elements, but 4 prong L14-30 for the main power. Spa panel setup seems reasonably cheaper. Thanks for the schematic.

Option 3: Combo of 1 and 2, because the pumps look pretty sweet.

Option 4: Install a 240v to 120v transformer into the box. Being and electric boob, I'll have to reach out for some pointers. Not really leaning toward this one.

Does this sound about right?

If I go with the DC pumps, I'd love to add disconnects at the panel. Would also be into speed control (PWM) if it cheap and panel mountable too. Otherwise, I'd just use the ball valve for control as per typical.

I always appreciate the willingness to help around here.
 

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Option 5: Run just the kettle element (and HLT if you have one) on the 240V circuit, and run the pumps etc. on a separate 120V circuit. 120V GFCI is cheap, so that doesn't add much cost.

With this option, you can run DC wiring from one side to the other if you want a single control panel, but I'd keep the 240 and 120 V boxes separate. I just have a simple power control box for my kettle, and a completely separate control box for the pumps and the RIMS tube. Also, I can run my RIMS tube full power at 2kW and my kettle at 5.5kW if I want to heat strike water quickly.

I also use my RIMS control box as a standalone unit for controlling a water bath for cheesemaking, and it'd also work for sous-vide or other temperature control duties.
 
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obeahsf

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Its better us use a 24V dc powersupply installed in the panel IMHO those wall wort powersupplies are kind of on the weak side usually and have a fairly high failure rate unless its a good one.
the switching DC powersupplies usually run on 240v no problem... I use 24v food grade P38I pumps wired this way with pwm speed control to turn down flow when wanted.

Hey Augie, I am super interested in this, but I really have no idea how to wire them up. Do you have them hard-wired into a DIN rail power supply like this:
https://store.brewpi.com/td5-24v-brewing-pump

I would really like to have a disconnect plug/receptacle option at the panel, so they don't have to be attached the when not in use. The speed control on at Brewpi looks pretty sweet too. Do you prefer that to just using a ball valve for control?

Any thoughts on panel mounts or wiring beta would be super appreciated. Your always full of info. Thanks!
 

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Hey Augie, I am super interested in this, but I really have no idea how to wire them up. Do you have them hard-wired into a DIN rail power supply like this:
https://store.brewpi.com/td5-24v-brewing-pump

I would really like to have a disconnect plug/receptacle option at the panel, so they don't have to be attached the when not in use. The speed control on at Brewpi looks pretty sweet too. Do you prefer that to just using a ball valve for control?

Any thoughts on panel mounts or wiring beta would be super appreciated. Your always full of info. Thanks!
wiring them up is very easy... there are many possible physical configuratuions but I just wired 240v to the power supply after confirming it it ran on 80-280v(L= N both get L1 and L2 power and G gets ground) and as far as the pwm controllers theres a + and - in and out to the motor and the potentiometer knob pre wired that plugs in. I bought standoffs and drilled 4 holes to mount each little pwm speed control board... the power out to the mortor wires are actually wired to an XLR/ pin aviation connecter to plug the pump into the panel.

I used these speed controllers, http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Qualit...1cf9026&pid=100005&rk=1&rkt=6&sd=320910156730

these connectors, http://www.ebay.com/itm/5pcs-Aviati...328891?hash=item33a983f27b:g:XEQAAOSw37tV-P~k

and a power supply like this because the pumps do draw 1.8 amps each dispite a lot of sellers advertising them as less., http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-A...hash=item51e8737ef2:m:mePIhj5ScEfHPmEF-aTGQQw (theres a switch inside to flip for 240v power source wiring.)

a din rail power supply would work great too, I wasnt concerned about the cosmetics or being organized at the time.

oh and these pumps... http://www.ebay.com/itm/301933987454?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT they are designed for food grade applications and good for boiling temps.

as you can see I leave them permanently plumbed in since I dont move any hoses of connectors around when brewing.

IMG_20170121_140632324[1].jpg
 
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obeahsf

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To get 120V in your control panel, you need to have a four wire feed (2 hots, neutral, and ground.) An L6-30 only allows for three wires. Your in-line GFCI probably won't work (it will trip every time you draw any 120V current) since it is wired to only check current flowing thru the two hot wires. Any 120V current would flow to the ground (or neutral, depending on how you use the third wire), causing unbalanced current thru the two hots, which will trip the GFCI. A four wire GFCI sums the currents in both hots AND neutral, so can handle 120V currents (which flow from one hot to neutral.) There is a way to wire up a spa panel w/GFCI to avoid this issue. See the diagram below.

View attachment 389764

Brew on :mug:

Thanks for the info and for the schematic. Looks super easy. It's no problem using the 50amp GFCI with 30 amp service?

Like this:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BQT1AS/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

Thanks!
 
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augiedoggy

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Thanks for the info and for the schematic. Looks super easy. It's no problem using the 50amp GFCI with 30 amp service?

Like this:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BQT1AS/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

Thanks!

The 50a spa panels gfci function works no matter how small the load... even when used for a hot tub it only uses like 20-30 amps when the heater is on or just a pump is on and the gfci function still have to work.
So yeah it will work fine but you need to be sure the main breaker feeding the circuit from the main box is the correct 30a size.

Please note that Dougs suggestion does work but it also violates electrical code since the neutral and ground are only allowed to join each other at the main panel coming into the building...(Usually im the one suggesting it and others bite my head off for it here so)
 
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obeahsf

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The 50a spa panels gfci function works no matter how small the load... even when used for a hot tub it only uses like 20-30 amps when the heater is on or just a pump is on and the gfci function still have to work.
So yeah it will work fine but you need to be sure the main breaker feeding the circuit from the main box is the correct 30a size.

Please note that Dougs suggestion does work but it also violates electrical code since the neutral and ground are only allowed to join each other at the main panel coming into the building...(Usually im the one suggesting it and others bite my head off for it here so)

Thanks Augie. I know the drill.

I don't suppose there's anyway to use the speed control on these while simultaneously using the outboard AC/DC converter? I assume I'd have to wire them inline between the adapter and pump? I'm sure it costs extra because they are included. So, I might as well stick with the 120 at the panel in that case.

https://www.brewhardware.com/product_p/topsfloss.htm.
 

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Thanks Augie. I know the drill.

I don't suppose there's anyway to use the speed control on these while simultaneously using the outboard AC/DC converter? I assume I'd have to wire them inline between the adapter and pump? I'm sure it costs extra because they are included. So, I might as well stick with the 120 at the panel in that case.

https://www.brewhardware.com/product_p/topsfloss.htm.
the speed controllers need to go between the motor and power supply .. its as easy as + and - in and + and - out though..
Yeah those topsflo pumps are 5 gallons per minute flow and they have a sealed head which I guess could have some advantage... The $18 ones are just over 3 gpm... and the speed controller and power supply would set you back another $10-15 together but as you say the topsflo are ready to go.. and they do have a stainless head if you plan on moving them around a lot that has advantages.. I saw the benefit in the cheaper pps ones because I just wired 3 of them up permanently in my system and each one has its own purpose... I normally recirculate down at 1.8 gallons per minute which actually helps prevent channeling and plugging up my grain bed and works perfest so I normally get 86% efficiency but on my last brew session with a new control panel and the SS brewing "sparge arm" I got just over 92% somehow according to beersmith..(checked with 2 different refractometers) my rims temp probe was reading a bit High and by the time I got it calibrated I believe a lot of conversion took place at a lower temp so..
 
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obeahsf

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just a small hole.. I think I driller a 3/16 or 1/4" hole for mounting the pot knob and four smaller holes to mount the board.
 
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the speed controllers need to go between the motor and power supply .. its as easy as + and - in and + and - out though..

Hi Augie,

I bought a couple of these PWM speed controllers for 2 Topsflo TD5 pumps. I am wiring them up, though, and realize I need to translate the Chinese to distinguish "in" from "out." Would you happen to know which is which?

Also, which is the correct order?

1. Power Supply-DC Converter-PWM-On/OFF-Pump
2. Power Supply-DC Converter-On/OFF-PWM-Pump

Much appreciated as always!

-1.jpg


-2.jpg
 

augiedoggy

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Hi Augie,

I bought a couple of these PWM speed controllers for 2 Topsflo TD5 pumps. I am wiring them up, though, and realize I need to translate the Chinese to distinguish "in" from "out." Would you happen to know which is which?

Also, which is the correct order?

1. Power Supply-DC Converter-PWM-On/OFF-Pump
2. Power Supply-DC Converter-On/OFF-PWM-Pump

Much appreciated as always!

I am not home to check but doesn't only one set of inputs have the + and -? If so I believe that is the power in. It looks like yours are both labeled the same..
I would suggest looking g at them on eBay where some sellers will have a wiring diagram pic on the sale page.

Also Im sure you already know this but many of the TD5 and ts5 pumps have the mppt controllers in them which will counteract the effect of these somewhat.
 
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