A lot of sediment/trub in bottles

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Justbrew23

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What’s up brewers? I made my third extract batch a few weeks ago which was a zombie dust clone. I let it ferment for 3 weeks and dry hopped it during the second week. It has been conditioning in bottles for two weeks. However, there is a lot of sediment in the bottles. It smells really good and seems to have good carbonation. I even filtered it through a wire strainer went transferring it to my bottling bucket.
Any suggestions on how long I should wait? Will it clear up in a few weeks or months? I’m hope I didn’t ruin it. My other two brews changed drastically in taste after a few weeks but didn’t have much sediment. Any advice is appreciated.
 

C.N. Brewer

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By no means did you ruin it, sediment is normal in the bottom of the bottle. Could be that yeast didn’t attenuate as well in this batch. Totally normal. Give it an extra week or 2 because the yeast might continue to drop out and increase your bottled beer clarity. No worries friend!
 

ESBrewer

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Because you brew with extract, the trub is most likely yeast. There could be some haze particles as well. There is always some yeast sediment in beers that are bottle carbonated, but the amount of sediment varies based on the amount of yeast that ends up in the bottles. You probably changed to a less flocculent yeast strain for this batch so more yeast is ending up in the bottles? Or there are other factors that affect the flocculation (physical properties of the beer, ions in water or maybe the fermentation took longer than expected and the yeast didn't have that much time to drop).

In the future you could cold crash the fermenter before bottling this beer to speed up the flocculation process. Could even use a little bit of gelatin if it is meant to be very clear (I'm not that familiar with zombies). If the bottle carbonation has now finished, you can move the bottles to the fridge (as cold as possible) to speed up clarification (and sediment formation..).
 
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PADave

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You will probably want to drink it pretty quick, as using a wire strainer going into the bottling bucket probably introduced a lot of oxygen into the beer.
 

ESBrewer

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Yes and the extra oxygen in the bottles may have caused the yeast to proliferate a bit, leading to some extra sediment. For minimum amount of sediment (and maximum taste), I would keep the head space in minimum, use bottling wand and avoid introducing air by any means (such as splashing or using a strainer in between).
 
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Justbrew23

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Thanks for all the info and tips. I’ll continue to wait and hopefully it’ll be ready in a few more weeks. I used the strainer on another batch and it didn’t seem to effect anything. The carbonation seems really good, hopefully it’ll turn out alright.
 
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