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7 days, almost no carb

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SteveHeff

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I bottled 9 days ago. Very little carbonation in the bottle I tried last night. They've been in my basement at 55-60 degrees. I fermented in the basement with great results, but should I expect the priming to work slower than the fermentation? I've never had a beer take this long to prime.
 

wherestheyeast

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For average OG beers (1.040-1.050) It seems the advice is 3 weeks @ 70*F in the bottle before refrigerating for 2-3 days before pouring.

Now I had a basic APA carb up nicely after about 10 days, but I had a saison that took 2-3 months before there was consistent carbonation from bottle to bottle. Not to scare you, but I also had a batch never carb due to faulty capper and/or caps....

I'd prolly move the bottles out of the basement (someplace warmer) and try a bottle in another couple weeks.

Hope it works out.
 

Yooper

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I've never had any luck with my bottles carbing up in my basement. I had to keep them someplace warmer.

Maybe you could bring up a few of them at a time, and keep them in a warm place until they carb up if you don't have room for all of them in a warm spot.
 

dpatrickv

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Sometimes it can take a couple weeks.


Quit worrying.
 

Hopper5000

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what kind of beer are we talking about, %? Sometimes bigger beers (like over 8%) take longer to carbonate. Also beers that have been sitting around for a while in promary and/or secondary can have carbing issues too.

I think your first step (like the others have said) should be moving it to a warmer spot and wait for a couple weeks.
 

homebrewdad

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Too cold, nowhere near enough time. Move them somewhere warmer and wait a couple of weeks.
 
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SteveHeff

SteveHeff

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It's a blood orange APA. ABV is around 6.4%. It's been one of the higher values I've brewed in about 2 years. I'm going to transfer a case of 15 upstairs for 4 days and rotate until they've all had the chance to sit at 68. I'll check back in another week and a half.
 
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SteveHeff

SteveHeff

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I had a feeling, too, that I was getting a bit ansy. This is probably the worst part about brewing...waiting...waiting...waiting.
 

Revvy

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I bottled 9 days ago. ....
And THIS is why your beer isn't carbed yet....

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Temp and gravity are the two most important factors as to how long it will take.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience." ;)

Carbonation is actually foolproof, you add sugar, the yeast eats it and farts co2 which carbs the beer. It's not a complex system, and there's very little that can go wrong...It just takes time.....
 

Xpertskir

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I had a feeling, too, that I was getting a bit ansy. This is probably the worst part about brewing...waiting...waiting...waiting.
Home brewing is basically just waiting and cleaning. If you dont like the waiting, hopefully you like the cleaning :D
 
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SteveHeff

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I have some others sitting in the basement currently, that I brewed 4 months ago. I have an oatmeal chocolate stout, which took around 3 weeks to carb up, but has really mellowed over the last few months. So, I do understand the timing and waiting aspect. HOWEVER, this process has been MUCH slower in this batch vs other batches. This even includes my Belgian Dubbel I brewed almost 2 years ago. I guess I was just disappointed with the rate at which this was happening. I do understand the process of yeast eats sugar and carbs up beer. Maybe it was a lack of defining what I really wanted answered that got me here.
 

homebrewdad

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I have some others sitting in the basement currently, that I brewed 4 months ago. I have an oatmeal chocolate stout, which took around 3 weeks to carb up, but has really mellowed over the last few months. So, I do understand the timing and waiting aspect. HOWEVER, this process has been MUCH slower in this batch vs other batches. This even includes my Belgian Dubbel I brewed almost 2 years ago. I guess I was just disappointed with the rate at which this was happening. I do understand the process of yeast eats sugar and carbs up beer. Maybe it was a lack of defining what I really wanted answered that got me here.
Okay... but three weeks versus nine days should tell you a lot right there. And nine days at cold temps... oi.

There are dozens of these threads every week. Three weeks at seventy degrees is the baseline. If you go colder, expect it to be slower - maybe even much slower, or not at all (as Yooper stated).
 
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