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sbkg

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Hey there kind folk I have a quick question.

So once I find the carbonation level I like in my beers; do I then get the bottles in the fridge or basement to stop carbonation?

Thanks guys!
 
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sbkg

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How do I keep the carb. level low in the darker beers?

My first batch was a standard Nut brown, and I liked it more at about 12-14 days of being bottled. It's still good (well almost gone) but maybe a little too much carb.
 
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sbkg

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I like the double dog IPA icon mutilated!

wheres that clone?
 

jdoiv

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Just use a little less dextrose at bottling time. Some of the software programs will allow you to calculate how much dextrose to use to achieve a desired carbonation level. Best to weigh your dextrose rather than using a measuring cup.
 

Yooper

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What I've always done is adjust the amount of priming sugar based on the type of beer. For example, my brown ale is overcarbed (ask Mutiltated!) but I used the amount of priming sugar I always do (4 ounces per 5 gallons). If I make a brown ale again, I'll reduce the priming sugar. If you have brewing software (I have Beersmith), this is easy to do. Or you can use a carbonation chart.

The next time I make that brown ale, I'll use 2.75 ounces priming sugar, per Beersmith.
 

Mutilated1

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that brown ale sure does taste good though...

Here is my dumbed down version of why overcarbonation happens according to what I understand and have learned from reading the topics here... I'm hardly an expert or anything but... overcarbonation may happen as a result of any of the following:

1. You don't wait till fermentation is done before you bottle, so there is still unfermented sugars in your beer which makes for more sugar for the yeasties to eat, thus more carbonation

2. You put too much priming sugar

3. I seem to remember reading some comments about not enough headspace in the bottles, or maybe it was too much headspace ??? Anyway, I'm not sure if thats true or not but I think some people have that idea just based on what I've read.
 

Joker

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I agree with statement one and two. Not to sure about three though, I would have to experiment with that one first.
 
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sbkg

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Thanks!

That nut brown came in a kit with I believe 5oz of priming sugar.

My LHBS says 3/4 cup then I've read 5oz.
 
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